Family Medicine Center

By Doug Boyd

Patient Robert Fulghum, left, and Dr. Robert Newman talk in the ECU Family Medicine Center. The center recently received national recognition as a patient-centered medical home. (Photo by Doug Boyd)

The Family Medicine Center at ECU has gained recognition as a “patient-centered medical home” from a national organization.

The National Committee for Quality Assurance has identified the center as a medical practice where each patient has an ongoing relationship with a doctor who leads a team that takes responsibility for patient care and, when needed, arranges referrals for care with other doctors.

ECU achieved level III recognition, the highest possible.

“NCQA certification is a formal recognition that we have created a patient-centered medical home that allows for easy access for our patients, continuity with the same medical provider, (and) comprehensive care including hospital care and obstetrical care,” said Dr. Robert Newman, vice chair for clinical services for the ECU Department of Family Medicine. “We have also started to measure our clinical performance and patient-satisfaction scores against nationally established benchmarks.”

Patient Robert Fulghum, a retired microbiology faculty member at ECU and a patient of Newman’s, said he has recommended the Family Medicine Center to several people who wanted to establish care at a medical practice.

“They don’t just examine you and say, ‘Here, take these pills,’ and send you off,” said Fulghum, 81. “They allow you to participate in the decisions that are made.”

When referrals to specialists are needed, Family Medicine Center staff members assist with that and follow up. “However, I haven’t really felt the need to go to a specialist,” Fulghum said.

Faculty and staff members began working on the certification in February 2009 and submitted an application in April.

Numerous physician groups contributed to the nine standards for measuring patient-centered medical homes, such as access, communication, care management and referral tracking.

“The patient-centered medical home promises to improve health and health care,” said NCQA President Margaret E. O’Kane. “The active, ongoing relationship between a patient and a physician in medical homes fosters an all-too-rare goal in care: staying healthy and preventing illness in the first place.”

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Tuthill fits the bill

Lynn Tuthill (Brody School of Medicine) is an active volunteer with District 65 of the State Employees Association of North Carolina. Above, she displays the District of the Year award presented to the district. (Contributed photo)

By Judy Currin

Wanted: Individual possessing practically unlimited reserves of energy, a willingness to sacrifice untold hours of time in service to the community and a creative flair for documenting history in scrapbook format.

Position filled: by Lynn Tuthill, a remittance specialist in the Clinical Financial Services Department for the Brody School of Medicine, who applies her energy, time and creativity toward her volunteer work for District 65 in the State Employees Association of North Carolina.

Tuthill serves SEANC as a board member and volunteer action chair/historian. Her scrapbook – a yearly compilation of the organization’s activities – is more aptly described as a tome. Bulging to approximately four inches thick, the book is chockfull of news clippings, meeting minutes, flyers, board member profiles and awards, along with page after page of photographs, taken by Tuthill during district activities.

“We are a pretty busy group of volunteers,” said Tuthill, a second year inductee into ECU’s Servire Society.

A quick glance at the scrapbook makes it clear. This group has worked hard to earn the many honors they have received, including the District of the Year for 2008-2009 and for 2009-2010.

Leafing through the initial pages of the scrapbook, one might see photographic documentation of the group’s participation in Pitt County’s Relay for Life, an overnight event that celebrates the lives of those who have battled cancer and remembers loved ones lost.

“We raised approximately $7,000 for the American Cancer Society,” said Tuthill. She said the district has had a team in the Pitt County Relay for more than 15 years, raising approximately $50,000 altogether.

Farther along in the scrapbook, photos appear from the annual golf tournament, which raises funds for SEANC’s scholarship program. “Every year, our organization provides $50,000 in scholarship grants for members and their dependents statewide,” Tuthill said. “Locally, we provide a total of $1,500.”

Scrapbook pages also document the election of new officers, membership drives, lobbying activities, luncheons, meetings, training, and donations to families. Special emphasis is given to volunteer work for the Children’s Miracle Network Celebration broadcast, which provides equipment and services for sick and injured children and their families, and Habitat for Humanity, which constructs affordable homes in an effort to eliminate poverty.

In December, page after page illustrates the group’s numerous efforts to help families in need. As part of their holiday activities, Tuthill said, the group decorates miniature Christmas trees each year for a local nursing home and participates in the Club Rudolph program through the Greenville Community Shelter, which helps families needing assistance.

“Each year we adopt two children,” Tuthill said. “The district donates $150.00 per child towards the purchase of Christmas gifts from their wish list.”

Of all the pages in the book, Tuthill finds the Relay for Life images the most compelling. That event is “closest to my heart,” she said. “Cancer has taken several people who were close to me. I pray and hope one day in my lifetime, they will find a cure.”

As evidenced by her arduous work on the scrapbook, Tuthill always applies her best efforts to the work for SEANC District 65. Debbie Austin, SEANC treasurer and scholarship chair, said, “Lynn goes above and beyond what is needed for all the projects she does.”

“Her vision is to take any cause and make it a success for the greater good.”

SEANC is a 55,000-member association committed to protecting and enhancing the rights and benefits of current, retired and future state employees. Local members meet on the third Tuesday of every month at Lakeside Annex 1. Tuthill encourages all ECU employees to attend meetings and join a district that thrives on giving back to the community.

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The SEANC scrapbook illustrates many hours of volunteer efforts completed through the organization. As SEANC historian, Tuthill puts the book together. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

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Cola Contract

Zak McLamb, left, and Jeff Ferber haul a Coke machine up the stairs at the Whichard Building Annex Dec. 20 on East Carolina University's campus. McLamb said he and Ferber, both Coca-Cola Bottling Company employees, were placing an average of 10 machines a day on campus. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

GREENVILLE   (Dec. 22, 2010) —  East Carolina University officials have awarded exclusive pouring rights to Coca-Cola Bottling Company Consolidated, after reviewing request for proposal responses submitted to the university.

The contract gives Coke the exclusive right to sell its products on campus for a period of 10 years beginning January 1, 2011. This replaces the previous contract with Minges Bottling Group, a Pepsi-Cola company, which had been in place since 1998. The East Carolina University Board of Trustees was advised of the award at their November meeting.

ECU Associate Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance–Business Services Scott Buck said the bidding process was more complex due to state requirements to separately request proposals for soft drinks, juice, and bottled water. Coca-Cola’s combined bids totaled $10.5 million for the 10-year period.

“We have enjoyed a positive working relationship with Pepsi and the Minges Bottling Group and have a tremendous respect for the Minges family and their ties to East Carolina and the region,” said Buck. “This new contract represents the beginning of a new relationship, and we are extremely pleased with the generous commitment that Coke has made to ECU.”

ECU followed the trend of most other universities in the 1990s of awarding an exclusive contract to a beverage provider in order to generate revenue for the school. Canned, bottled, and fountain drinks sold or distributed on campus, in university dining halls, cafes and convenience shops, as well as at all athletic concessions, special events, and vending machines are covered under the contract.

The university will allocate the revenue from the new contract to academic merit scholarships, athletic scholarships, and leadership and educational projects. The Athletics Department will receive funding for capital projects. A percentage will go to an endowment fund for academic scholarships, an endowment fund for grants-in-aid to student-athletes. And a portion will go to continue funding a staff/faculty textbook loan program and faculty/student leadership programs.

A request for proposals was distributed in September and bids were opened October 18. Auxiliary Services Director Willie Lee coordinated the bid process and is the contract administrator.

“We expect a smooth transition as campus facilities and equipment are changed from one provider to the other,” said Lee.  “Students, staff, and faculty will see the changes when they return for the spring semester after the holidays.”

One thing that will not immediately change is the price. Under the new contract, vending prices will remain the same for most products for at least three years. After that time, pricing will be evaluated, and any decisions to adjust prices will be made jointly.

Coca-Cola Bottling Company Consolidated carries a number of different popular brands in almost every category. Coke’s lineup includes traditional soft drinks such as Coke, Diet Coke, Coke Zero, Cherry Coke, Sprite, Sprite Zero, Mello Yello, Dr. Pepper, Diet Dr. Pepper, Fanta Orange and Grape, Seagram’s Ginger Ale, Nestea, Hi-C, and Sundrop. Additionally, Coke will be offering juice products, such as Minute Maid, Fuze, V8 Splash and V8 Fusion blends, as well as bottled water products that include Dasani, Vitaminwater, and Smartwater. Coke will also carry Powerade, Full Throttle and NOS in the isotonic and energy drink categories. While not all types of beverages will be offered at every venue, the product assortment will be adjusted based on product sales and customer preference in specific areas.

Representatives of the local Coca-Cola bottler said they are excited to be back on ECU’s campus. Coca-Cola Bottling Company Consolidated has their corporate offices in Charlotte and is very familiar with having exclusive rights on college campuses, including similar relationships with universities including N.C. State, West Virginia, Clemson, and the University of South Carolina.

For more information about the transition, visit http://www.ecu.edu/vending/coke.cfm

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Faculty Authors

Marjorie Ringler with the Department of Educational Leadership, left, is congratulated by Provost Marilyn Sheerer during the first Academic Affairs Faculty Book Awards recognition, hosted by Joyner Library.

Joyner Library hosts inaugural program honoring faculty authors

The inaugural program at J.Y. Joyner Library at East Carolina University honoring faculty members who published books during the previous year recognized 38 faculty members Thursday.

The Academic Affairs Faculty Book Awards event honored faculty in the colleges and schools that are part of the Division of Academic Affairs. The awards recognized peer-reviewed books authored, co-authored or edited by ECU faculty and published between July 1, 2009, and July 30, 2010.

“Publishing a scholarly book is a significant professional achievement for university faculty. We want to recognize our scholars and reward them for their research efforts. The library is an important partner in the creation of scholarly output so it’s a natural fit for us to host such an event,” said Dr. Larry Boyer, dean of Academic Library and Learning Resources.

Provost Marilyn Sheerer was at the event to congratulate the honorees. “Acknowledging our faculty who authored books is one of the most important activities in which we could engage,” she said. “Book publication represents one of our highest forms of scholarship and faculty should be duly recognized.”

Faculty members honored are as follows:

Eric Bailey, Dept. of Anthropology; Alice Arnold, School of Art and Design; Jessica Christie, School of Art and Design; Elizabeth Hodge, Dept. of Business and Information Technologies Education; Huanqing Lu, Dept. of Construction Management; Elizabeth Fogarty, Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction – Elementary Education; Mark L’Esperance, Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction – English History and Middle Grades; Peggy Yates, Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction – Elementary Education; Andrzej Grodner, Dept. of Economics; Anna Froula, Dept. of English: Film Studies; Donald Palumbo, Dept. of English; Margaret Bauer, Dept. of English; Wendy Sharer, Dept. of English; Kirk St. Amant, Dept. of English; Ken Parille, Dept. of English.

And Catherine Smith, Dept. of English; Tarek Abdel-Salam, Dept. of Engineering; Ed Howard, Dept. of Engineering; Katie Ford, Dept. of Foreign Language and Literature – Spanish; Peter Standish, Dept. of Foreign Language and Literature – Spanish; Glen Gilbert, College of Health and Human Performance; Christopher Oakley, Dept. of History; Larry Tise, Dept. of History; Hal Holloman, Dept. of Educational Leadership; Crystal Chambers, Dept. of Higher, Adult, and Counselor Education; Marjorie Ringler, Dept. of Educational Leadership; David Siegel, Dept. of Higher, Adult, and Counselor Education; David Hursh, Academic Library Services; Kaye Dotson, Dept. of Library Science; Jami Jones, Dept. of Library Science; John Kros, Dept. of Marketing & Supply Chain Management.

And Michael Bosse, Dept. of Mathematics, Science and Instructional Technology Education; Richard McCarty, Dept. of Philosophy; Altheia Cook, Dept. of Political Science; Peter Francia, Dept. of Political Science; Bonnie Mani, Dept. of Political Science; Debra Jordan, Dept. of Recreation and Leisure Studies; and David Knox, Dept. of Sociology.

Joyner Library collects, organizes, preserves and provides access to books for education, research and enrichment. A shelf in the circulation reading room has been designated to highlight books by ECU faculty, and all works are available for check out.

The program was made possible with support from the Office of the Provost.

Inspiration for this awards ceremony was drawn from the annual program of Laupus Library that recognizes scholarship by faculty in the ECU Division of Health Sciences.

For more information, contact Dawn Wainwright at 252-328-4090.

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New Croatan

Faculty, staff and students returning for the Spring 2011 semester found a newly renovated Croatan, with new and exciting options for meals on campus including a full-service Chick-Fil-A and a Chili's Too. Pictured above, John Worsley cleans the Chili’s Too sign on the second floor of the redone Croatan. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

New Croatan opens as students return to ECU

By Jeannine Manning Hutson

Former East Carolina University students who remember the Croatan from its early years will be surprised to learn where they used to pop in for a soft drink and sandwich has been replaced with a building housing two full-service restaurants.

Built in 1970, the Croatan had grown to house a Chick-fil-A Express and serve approximately 3,000 customers per day. The building was demolished in June 2009 to make way for the two-story building that stands on the site today, which opened for faculty, staff and students Jan. 10.

The new Croatan houses two foodservice offerings: Chili’s Too and an expanded full-service Chick-fil-A. Private and public dining areas will be available on the first floor; the second floor will house Chili’s Too, where customers can order at a counter and dine in a restaurant seating area.

Upstairs, the private dining area has been named “The University Club” and will provide table-service for faculty and staff members from 11 a.m to 2 p.m. and can be reserved by groups, including student clubs, for dinner meetings. On its walls are framed ECU sports jerseys and sports photos. Downstairs, two meetings area will allow large groups, up to 120 people, to meet in “The Green Room,” or a small group in a side meeting room.

In all, the two restaurant spaces can seat approximately 400 customers, approximately five-times more than the former Croatan.

The update aimed at the preferences of students’ tastes, said Stephanie Sumner, marketing manager with ECU Campus Dining/Aramark.

“We’ve started advertising two months ago about the new facility’s opening date and we’re hearing a lot of buzz from students and everything we’re hearing from them is positive,” Sumners said Thursday, as crews finished last minute details such as power-washing the outside walkways.

The structure will also be the first LEED-certified building on campus. LEED ratings measure the environmental sustainability of a building. Special lighting, water cisterns in the courtyard and ecologically friendly landscaping are planned. An interesting component of the building, and part of the LEED accreditation, is that the bricks used on the outside of the building were reclaimed from a demolished N.C. tobacco warehouse.

The contractor for the project was Rodgers Builders from Charlotte.

Campus groups interested in reserving dining space for meetings in the new Croatan should call ECU Catering at 328-4756.

croatan2

Francis Winn prepares a coffeemaker for the opening of the Croatan.

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