New Music Festival begins this week

The 2011 East Carolina University New Music Festival will bring artists from around the country, including the Genkin Philharmonic from Buffalo, New York, Yukiko Sekino from Boston, and composer Ross Bauer from California, to the university’s campus.

The festival also features ECU faculty and students performing in conjunction with bands in the current Greenville popular music scene. More than 50 percent of School of Music students will participate in festival performances.

The New Music Festival performance schedule is as follows:

Tuesday: Ensemble 4.33 presents Morton Feldman’s “Crippled Symmetry,”

7:30 p.m., A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall. Free.

Wednesday: Jon Nelson, trumpet; Jon Lombardo, trombone; Tom Kolor, percussion, 7:30 p.m., A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall. Free.

Thursday: Genkin Philharmonic, 7:30 p.m., A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall. Free.

Friday: Yukiko Sekino & Keiko Sekino, piano duo, 7:30 p.m., A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall. Free.

Saturday: ECU NewMusic Camerata, 3 p.m., A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall; East Carolina University Orchestra, 7:30 pm, Wright Auditorium. Both free.

March 20: marc faris’ Alternative Community, 3 p.m., Toyota Amphitheater, Greenville Town Common, free; Chris Ulffers and friends, bassoon, 7:30 p.m., St. Paul’s Church, free; Midori, violin, 7:30 pm, Wright Auditorium, Ticketed event. Call 1-800-ECU-ARTS.

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Faculty art exhibit opening

An art exhibition featuring work by faculty members in the ECU School of Art and Design will open March 17 at J.Y. Joyner Library.

This exhibition, the first at Joyner Library open to all School of Art and Design faculty, showcases the talent and demonstrates the unique vision of this group. Works include paintings and drawings, textile and metal designs, sculpture, photography, pottery and other medium. Read more…

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Exhibit featuring art by ECU faculty opening Thursday

An art exhibition featuring work by faculty members in the ECU School of Art and Design will open March 17 at J.Y. Joyner Library.

This exhibition, the first at Joyner Library open to all School of Art and Design faculty, showcases the talent and demonstrates the unique vision of this group. Works include paintings and drawings, textile and metal designs, sculpture, photography, pottery and other medium.

“It is always a delight to work with the Art & Design faculty; being able to display their art adds so much to the library experience, providing all of our users a richer cultural environment,” said Larry Boyer, dean of Academic Library and Learning Resources.

Previous art exhibitions included individual faculty shows and works from the women studio faculty artists.

“The College of Fine Arts and Communication is excited and pleased at this newest showcasing of faculty art from the School of Art and Design at East Carolina University,” said Michael Dorsey, interim dean for the college. “Joyner Library and its leadership have been enthusiastic in supporting the celebration of the arts as one of the university’s strategic directions. The exhibition, currently on display, clearly demonstrates why East Carolina is recognized as the leader in visual arts education in the state of North Carolina.”

The opening reception will be 5-7 p.m. Thursday. The exhibit runs through May 7 and is located in the exhibit gallery on the second floor of the library. The reception and exhibit viewing are free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Dawn Wainwright at 328-4090.

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ECU professor to read from her work

ECU’s Liza Wieland will read selections from her new book of short stories, “Quickening,” at Joyner Library on Tuesday.

Published in January by Southern Methodist University Press, “Quickening” is Wieland’s third short story collection. One reviewer has noted that it is a “deft, fleet, and luminous collection of stories” and that Wieland “has a gift for culling extraordinary prose from the ordinary human moment.”

Wieland, an Atlanta native, joined ECU’s English Department faculty to teach fiction in 2008. She has also published three novels and a collection of poetry. Her undergraduate degree is from Harvard; she earned her master’s and doctorate degrees from Columbia University. Read more…

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English professor to read from her work

ECU’s Liza Wieland will read selections from her new book of short stories, “Quickening,” at Joyner Library on Tuesday.

Published in January by Southern Methodist University Press, “Quickening” is Wieland’s third short story collection. One reviewer has noted that it is a “deft, fleet, and luminous collection of stories” and that Wieland “has a gift for culling extraordinary prose from the ordinary human moment.”

From the opening story in Wieland’s third story collection, in which a literary translator reflects on her first marriage, to the last, a poetic evocation of a daughter’s love for her mother, lyrical yet realistic portraits of women unfold, wrote one reviewer. Caught in revealing and cathartic moments, her characters, both historical and invented, find themselves at emotional crossroads: a young girl encounters the elderly Ezra Pound in Venice; Marie Curie’s daughter Eve attends the funeral of her mother’s lover in Paris; a woman survives the 1944 Nazi massacre in Oradour, France; a nun in New York City catches a baby dropped out a window; a U.S. college applicant performs sign language at poetry readings.

“Liza Wieland writes of discord with such harmony and wisdom that even the bad things that befall her characters feel limned with wonder and grace. For all its wonderfully realized tensions and conflicts, ‘Quickening’ is an oddly hopeful and redemptive book,” said Michael Parker, author of “Don’t Make Me Stop Now.”

Wieland, an Atlanta native, joined ECU’s English Department faculty to teach fiction in 2008. She has also published three novels and a collection of poetry. Her undergraduate degree is from Harvard; she earned her master’s and doctorate degrees from Columbia University.

The recipient of grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Christopher Isherwood Foundation, and the North Carolina Arts Council, Wieland has also won two Pushcart Prizes.

Wieland’s reading on Tuesday will begin at 8 p.m. on the second floor of Joyner Library. It is free and open to the public.

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The Mystical Arts of Tibet coming to campus

Buddhist monks from the Drepung Loseling Monastery will visit East Carolina University March 14-18 for a series of Dalai Lama-endorsed events intended to raise awareness of Tibetan civilization and contribute to world peace through sacred art.

The Mystical Arts of Tibet tour will feature a mandala sand painting celebration March 15-17 in the Mendenhall Student Center. Each day, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., the monks will lay millions of grains of sand into place on a platform to create a mandala. The mandala, according to tradition, is a symbol of the universe in its ideal form. Read more…

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ECU to host National History Day competition

More than 250 middle and high school students are expected to participate March 30 in the regional National History Day competition at East Carolina University. Judging at the event, themed “Debate and Diplomacy: Successes, Failures, Consequences” will begin at 10 a.m. in Mendenhall Student Center. The public is invited to attend, said Chad Ross, teaching assistant professor of history.

“You’ll see the excitement and energy in these kids’ faces,” said Ross, who is in his third year of organizing the event.  Read more…

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ECU to host National History Day

More than 250 middle and high school students are expected to participate March 30 in the regional National History Day competition at East Carolina University.

Judging at the event, themed “Debate and Diplomacy: Successes, Failures, Consequences” will begin at 10 a.m. in Mendenhall Student Center. The public is invited to attend, said Chad Ross, teaching assistant professor of history.

“You’ll see the excitement and energy in these kids’ faces,” said Ross, who is in his third year of organizing the event.

The regional NHD will draw students from counties east of Interstate 95. Winners will proceed to the state competition in Raleigh, which precedes the national contest in College Park, Md.

More than half a million students nationwide participate annually in NHD by writing papers or preparing exhibits, performances, websites or documentaries.

NHD helps students across the country develop critical thinking, research and presentation skills. It also fosters self-esteem and helps develop a sense of responsibility for an involvement in the democratic process.

A study released in January found that students who participated in National History Day perform better on high-stakes tests, are better writers, more confident and capable researchers, and have a more mature perspective on current events and civic engagement than their peers.

The ECU Department of History sponsors the regional contest as part of its efforts to interact with the community and bring history to people, Ross said.

To learn more about National History Day and the March 30 event, contact Chad Ross, Ph.D., teaching assistant professor of history, at 252-328-6089 or rossch@ecu.edu. More information can also be found at http://www.nhd.org.

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