ECU blood drives collect total of 98 units

Paula McCoy with the American Red Cross, standing, works with China Nuckolls as she donates blood Tuesday at the Student Recreation Center as part of a blood drive sponsored by ECU. The blood drive at the Student Rec Center had a goal of 50 units, saw 48 donors, including two first-time donors, and collected 42 units. At the old Laupus Library location on the Health Sciences Campus, 63 donors came to the blood drive and donated 56 units. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)


ECU, community college faculty collaborate on science teacher recruitment

East Carolina University faculty met with faculty from 14 community colleges June 7 to discuss ways to encourage more individuals to pursue a career in science education.

Science education faculty shared ideas and information to help community college faculty advise students interested in a science education career. Assistance with transfers to ECU were also part of the conversation.

Dr. Linda Patriarca, dean of the College of Education, encouraged the collaboration. She said, “As an employee of a community college, you are strategically placed to find individuals who show promise but may not have thought about science or science teaching.”

The event served as a kick off for a new teacher initiative through which faculty from the College of Education’s Department of Mathematics, Science and Instructional Technology Education work with community college faculty with the ultimate goal of filling public school classrooms with highly qualified science teachers.

The following community colleges were represented: Bladen Community College, Cape Fear Community College, Carteret Community College, Craven Community College, Central Carolina Community College, College of the Albemarle, Edgecombe Community College, James Sprunt Community College, Lenoir Community College, Pitt Community College, Sampson Community College, Vance Granville Community College, Wake Technical Community College, and Wilson Community College.

Additional information about science education opportunities may be found at:


Contact:  Laura Bilbro-Berry, East Carolina University

Phone: 252-328-1123, Email:



Technology connects Pirates in Greenville, Guatemala

 The College of Nursing hosted a global classroom by Skype today as faculty members in Greenville talked with ECU students and faculty in Guatemala.

Dr. Kim Larson, assistant professor of nursing, has led a study abroad class the past few summers where students have seen needs up close by working in health clinics, schools and nutrition centers in the Mayan community.    

Larson and nine undergraduate nursing students, and two psychology, two biology and four public health graduate students have been in Guatemala since May 22. They return this weekend.

Allison Broome, a senior nursing student, told participants that one of the biggest challenges has been the communication barrier. “I came here with limited Spanish,” she said.

Each morning the students have been learning Spanish. In the afternoon, they have worked in clinical areas and provided demonstration and information about the importance of hand-washing, nutrition and brushing teeth.

One afternoon they conducted an outreach clinic attended by 54 people. Not everyone could be seen, but the sickest were seen first. And everyone received vitamins, she said.  

Albee Ongsuco, a doctoral student in psychology, said she and another psychology student completed a tutoring practicum for middle schoolers in Green County last year and applied the same curriculum with students in Guatemala to assess similarities and differences.

“We found that the behaviors of middle schoolers and high schoolers were the same,” Ongsuco said. For instance, the students would sometimes talk out-of-turn or phone friends during a session, and several daydreamed or didn’t pay attention.

Yatta David, a master’s of public health student, said she and three other public health students assessed the local community’s readiness for natural disasters including communication, evacuation routes, and food and water safety. Last year’s nursing students actually were there during a mudslide.

In response to the college’s summer abroad program, this spring’s graduating nursing class raised $5,000 to pay for the construction of a well to provide clean drinking water for a village in Guatemala.



ECU master’s program ranked #1 in affordability

East Carolina University’s online master of science in technology systems degree program was ranked #1 best buy in comparable programs nationwide by

According to the site, the profiles reviewed 70 regionally accredited graduate schools that offer degrees in computer science or IT fields, ranking them by costs of tuition and distance learning fees. The average online master’s degree in computer science was $24,918. ECU’s cost was $5,070 for in-state residents and $20,790 for out-of-state residents.

Read more…


ECU chemistry professor writes on Queen Anne’s Revenge collaboration

An article by ECU chemistry professor Anthony Kennedy highlights the collaborative effort between ECU scientists and conservators at the Queen Anne’s Revenge Conservation Lab in identifying and conserving artifacts from the shipwreck believed to be the remains of Blackbeard’s Queen Anne’s Revenge.


The article, “Identification of suspected horn from the Queen Anne’s Revenge (1718), North Carolina, USA,” was published in May in the International Journal of Nautical Archaeology.

Co-authors included Thomas Fink (Biology), Wendy Welsh and Sarah Watkins-Kenney of the QAR Conservation Lab, and ECU undergraduate student Brianna Biscardi.

Read the article at


ECU professor honored by international society

East Carolina University English professor Kirk St. Amant was named an associate fellow by the Society for Technical Communication at the organization’s annual conference in Sacramento, Calif., May 17.

St. Amant

Associate fellow is one of the highest ranks that the society confers upon a member. Candidates are nominated by members and must have at least 15 years of experience in technical communication. They must be STC members for at least 10 years, with demonstrated contributions to the profession and the STC.

St. Amant is an associate professor of technical and professional communication and international studies at ECU. His background includes cultural anthropology, international government and technical communication.

He has taught technical and professional communication and inter-cultural communication for a number of U.S. universities, along with courses in e-commerce, distance education and business communication in the Ukraine with the USAID-sponsored Consortium for the Enhancement of Ukrainian Management Education. He has engaged in collaborative online and on-site teaching with the Aarhus School of Business in Denmark as well.

The STC honor recognized St. Amant’s contributions to “the advancement of research and teaching in intercultural technical communication” and to “academic editing and publishing in technical communication.”

The STC is an international association of technical communicators, the largest in the world with members on six continents. For more information, visit



ECU Club Baseball captures first ever national championship

Members of the ECU Club Baseball team celebrate their national championship win. (Contributed photo)


East Carolina University’s Club Baseball team won its first ever national championship by defeating Florida State 10-3 on June 2 in the National Club Baseball Association (NCBA) World Series title game.  It was the Pirates’ first trip to the World Series and it will go down as a memorable one.

“It’s a moment that I will never forget,” said Joe Caracci, ECU club baseball head coach.  “I just sat there on the bench and took it all in.  It was surreal.”

Trailing 3-1 heading to the bottom of the fifth, ECU exploded by scoring eight runs against Seminole starter Kevin McCourt to take a 9-3 lead and the Pirates never looked back. In all, 12 ECU Pirates batted in the fifth inning including two game changing hits by MJ Mackey and Brian Burgess which drove in two runs each and blew the game wide open.

For his efforts throughout the tournament and in the championship contest, Mackey was named the NCBA World Series MVP.  For the series, the Beaufort County product hit an incredible .429 with two triples, 10 RBI, and nine runs scored.

Perhaps lost in the shuffle of such a wild fifth inning was the performance of pitcher Zach Woodley, who picked up two wins in the tournament including seven strong innings where he limited FSU to just three runs in the championship.

“What an unbelievable tournament for Woodley,” said Caracci. “We honestly did not know what we would get out of him in the series because he didn’t pitch in the regional due to arm and back problems. But he really came through for us in a huge way.”

ECU opened the World Series with 4-2 win over their championship opponent FSU. It was then followed by a 14-2 shellacking of the tournament’s number one seed UC-Santa Barbara. The Pirates then stumbled against UCSB in an 11-8 loss before defeating the Gauchos 12-7 in the national semifinal.

The Pirates finished their dream season 29-8 overall.

“When I took over four years ago I had a vision,” said Caracci. “All of the guys that have come and gone through this program were a part of that vision. They laid the foundation for something special. The guys on this team made sure that their efforts were not in vain.”

For more information about the ECU Club Baseball program, visit or call (252) 328-6387.


Contact:  Gray Hodges, ECU Club Sports (
Telephone:   (252) 328-1576