Lecture to celebrate ECU diversity

Harvard professor Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr. will speak on “African-American Lives: Genetics, Genealogy and Black History” at 7 p.m. Nov. 10 in Wright Auditorium.

Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr.

The lecture celebrates 50 years of diversity at ECU. It is the third in the 2011-2012 Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series presented by the ECU Harriot College of Arts and Sciences.

Gates is the Alphonse Fletcher University professor and director of the W.E.B. DuBois Institute for African and African-American Research at Harvard University. He earned his M.A. and Ph.D. in English literature from Clare College and the University of Cambridge and his B.A. summa cum laude in history from Yale University.

Gates’ awards and honors include selection to Time magazine’s 25 Most Influential Americans list, a MacArthur Foundation genius grant, a National Humanities Medal, election to the American Academy of Arts and Letters and 44 honorary degrees.

In 2006, he was inducted into the Sons of the American Revolution, after he traced his lineage back to John Redman, a free Negro who fought in the Revolutionary War.

He serves on the boards of the New York Public Library, the Whitney Museum, Lincoln Center, the Aspen Institute, the Brookings Institution, the Studio Museum of Harlem, the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and Stanford University’s Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences.

Co-sponsors of the event include the 2011-2012 Voyages of Discovery Lectures Series; Office of Equity, Diversity, and Community Relations; Office of Student Affairs; Student Activities Board-Initiatives; Division of Research and Graduate Studies; and J.Y. Joyner Library.

Faculty, staff, and students may request one free ticket with a valid ECU ID by calling the ECU Central Ticket Office at 252-328-4788. 

For additional information, visit www.ecu.edu/voyages.

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4 thoughts on “Lecture to celebrate ECU diversity

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