Leo W. Jenkins Cancer Center earns re- accreditation

The Leo W. Jenkins Cancer Center has earned reaccreditation.


The Leo W. Jenkins Cancer Center has been awarded a three-year term of accreditation in radiation oncology as the result of a recent review by the American College of Radiology  and the American Society for Radiation Oncology. Radiation oncology is the careful use of high-energy radiation to treat cancer. A radiation oncologist may use radiation to cure cancer or to relieve a cancer patient’s pain.

“This accreditation is an affirmation of the dedication of our team of providers and the exceptional quality of care we provide,” said Dr. Peter Kragel, director of the cancer center and interim chair of radiation oncology at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University. “The people of eastern North Carolina can take advantage of the outstanding multidisciplinary care provided right here in Greenville, and rest assured that they are getting care that is recognized as being of the highest quality.”

The ACR-ASTRO seal of accreditation represents the highest level of quality and patient safety. It is awarded only to facilities meeting specific practice guidelines and technical standards developed by ACR and ASTRO after a peer-review evaluation by board-certified radiation oncologists and medical physicists who are experts in the field. Patient care and treatment, patient safety, personnel qualifications, adequacy of facility equipment, quality control procedures and quality assurance programs are assessed.

The cancer center was first accredited in 2006. Six other radiation oncology sites in North Carolina are ACR-ASTRO accredited.

 

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Scholar, funding support ECU chemistry department

Pictured from left to right are Wanda Williams, human resources manager, Fuji Silysia Chemical Ltd.; David Steffensen, controller, Fuji Silysia Chemical Ltd.; Takafumi Urushibara, technical center, Fuji Silysia Chemical Ltd.; Dr. Michael B. Brown, associate dean, Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences; Jennifer Tripp, major gifts officer, Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences; and Dr. Rickey Hicks, chairman, Department of Chemistry.

 

Fuji Silysia Chemical of Greenville donated $10,000 to the East Carolina University Department of Chemistry Thursday to support special projects in the department. The company is also supporting a master’s level chemical scientist, Takafumi Urushibara, as visiting scholar for two years.

“This is our way of building our relationship with East Carolina University, and a way that we give back to the community,” said Wanda S. Williams, human resources manager for Fuji Silysia Chemical.

“Fuji Silysia Chemical supports the advancement of technology of our local chemistry department. We are hoping, in our own small way, that this will help give back to our community as our community has helped us,” Williams said.

ECU chemistry department chair Dr. Rickey Hicks said, “These projects support our mission of providing the highest quality educational and research experiences to our undergraduate and graduate students.”

Fuji Silysia Chemical Ltd. is an international company established in 1965, which produces synthetic silica products used in various industries ranging from plastics and coatings to cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. The corporate headquarters are located in Japan, with additional offices in Italy, Switzerland and North Carolina.

At the Greenville location, the company makes silica gel, which is often used as a desiccant in food packaging. Silica gel keeps materials dry, preventing damage to food, artwork and other packaged products.

Additional information about Fuji Silysia Chemical Ltd. may be found online at http://www.fujisilysia.com. For more information about the ECU Department of Chemistry, contact Hicks at 252-328-9700 or hicksr@ecu.edu.

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Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series opens Sept. 5

The first African American female in space, a third generation paleontologist and the first woman to pilot a space shuttle are among the speakers in the 2012-13 Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series at East Carolina University.

Jemison

Dr. Mae C. Jemison will open the lecture series with “Exploring the Frontiers of Science and Human Potential,” Sept. 5 in Wright Auditorium on campus. Jemison flew into space aboard the Space Shuttle “Endeavor” in 1992, becoming the first African American woman to make that journey.

At the Oct. 2 premier lecture, Dr. Louise Leakey will present “Secrets in the Sands: Revelations into How We Became Human.” A member of the celebrated Leakey family of explorers, Leakey is a paleontologist, conservationist, an anthropology research professor at Stony Brook University and explorer-in-residence at National Geographic.

Col. Eileen Collins, the first woman to pilot and command a space shuttle will present “Leadership Lessons from Apollo to Discovery” Nov. 13.

The Jarvis Lecture on Christianity and Culture on March 5, 2013 will feature Dr. Amy-Jill Levine, E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Professor of New Testament Studies at Vanderbilt University Divinity School. Levine will discuss “Strange Bedfellows: The Bible, American Politics, and Homosexuality.”

Rounding out the series on March 21, 2013, Dr. Daniel K. Richter, Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor of American History at the University of Pennsylvania, will examine “Native Peoples and the Battle of Nooherooka.”

All lectures are open to the public and begin at 7 p.m. in Wright Auditorium, unless otherwise noted. Complimentary tickets are available to ECU students, faculty and staff, and are $10 for the general public, with the exception of the March 2013 Jarvis Lecture, which is free to all attendees. For tickets, call the ECU Central Ticket Office at 252-328-4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS.

For additional information about the series, contact Dr. John Tucker, director of the lecture series, at 252-328-1028 or tuckerjo@ecu.edu, or visit the series’ website at http://www.ecu.edu/voyages.

 

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Pirate C.A.V.E. enhances learning for ECU algebra students

East Carolina University students taking college algebra this fall will encounter a redesigned Math 1065 course that will send them underground for additional instruction.

Math 1065 students will attend one weekly 50-minute class sesson in a new learning lab called the Pirate C.A.V.E. (College Algebra Virtual Environment), located in the basement of Joyner Library. An additional three hours minimum in lab time will be required for the entire semester.

The curriculum change is modeled after a Louisiana State University program that has proven successful in decreating D and F grades, while increasing passing rates and retention, said Cathy Wilkerson, ECU mathematics instructor and lab director.

“I am very excited to be a part of our redesign of Math 1065. We have a great team of college algebra instructors, and we have been planning for its implementation for over a year,” Wilkerson said. “We are hopeful that we can achieve the same success that other universities have experienced with their redesigns.”

Students will use the MyMathLab software program in the lab to complete homework assignments and take all quizzes and exams. Supplemental videos provided by LSU are available, and additional videos are under production by faculty in the ECU mathematics department.

ECU faculty members and student tutors will provide assistance in the C.A.V.E. For each section of Math 1065, professors are required to spend two hours in the lab. Twenty student tutors have been hired, following rigorous training and a required 100 percent score on a Math 1065 exercise.

Dr. Johan Hattingh

Dr. Johan Hattingh, chair of the Department of Mathematics, said the primary goal of the redesign of Math 1065 is to shift students from a passive, note-taking role to an active orientation that will enhance learning.

“In essence, students learn math by doing math, not by listening to someone talk about doing math,” Hattingh said. “I am very excited about the redesign’s promise of improved grades and fewer withdrawals, as has been the case at several universities that have redesigned their college algebra course.”

“We have lost several fixed-term instructors due to the economic crisis, and the new lab will help the department continue to meet its huge foundational teaching commitments,” Hattingh said.

A ribbon cutting ceremony scheduled for 2 p.m. Aug. 15 will celebrate the lab’s grand opening. Beginning Aug. 21, the C.A.V.E. will be open 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday.

For additional information about the Pirate C.A.V.E., contact Wilkerson at 252-328-1892 or email wilkersonc@ecu.edu.

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In Memoriam: Coach Norman Earl Smith

East Carolina University Pirate Hall of Famer Norman Earl Smith died Aug. 5 in Fayetteville.

Smith was inducted into the Pirate Hall of Fame in 1977, in honor of his stellar coaching career in ECU basketball (1959-63) and baseball (1963-72).

Coach Norman Earl Smith
(Photo from ECUPirates.com)

With Smith at the helm, the Pirates baseball team finished first place in four consecutive years in the Southern Conference, from 1966 to 1970. The team’s overall record under Smith’s leadership was 185-103-2. Smith led the Pirate basketball team to a 53-40 record.

Smith graduated from ECU in 1939. From his sophomore year through his senior year, he was a member of the Pirates baseball, basketball and football teams.

Smith was also inducted into the Campbell University Athletics Hall of Fame in 1986 and the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame in 2003.

After retiring as a coach he became a professional baseball scout for the San Diego Padres.

For information on the Wednesday funeral service, visit http://www.directorsadvantage.net/sites/jernigan/new_view.php?id=99395.

 

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