ECU’s Campus Recreation and Wellness to host annual Beach Festival

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East Carolina University will host the third annual Beach Festival from 4:30 – 7:30 p.m. Sept. 4 at the North Recreational Complex.

The popular attraction drew more than 1,200 students in its first two years. Activities include a 300-foot zip line, a DJ, kayaking, stand up paddle boards, disc golf, corn hole, horseshoes, beach volleyball, bocce ball, karaoke, demonstrations and inflatables. Participants may enjoy free food and take-home giveaways such as souvenir Beach Festival glasses, golf discs, beach towels, ear buds and T-shirts.

“The Beach Festival is an opportunity to promote activities and introduce the amazing facilities that are available for ECU students at the North Recreational Complex,” said Janis Steele, associate director of facilities with Campus Recreation and Wellness.

Beach Festival is part of ECU’s Plunge into Purple, a series of events and programs in the first six weeks of the semester aimed at welcoming students to the university through education, socialization and involvement. The event is presented by Campus Recreation and Wellness in collaboration with the Student Activities Board.

All ECU students, faculty and staff are welcomed. An ECU One Card is required for admittance. ECU Transit will provide bus service to and from the complex.

Media are welcome to attend and cover the Beach Festival.  Please check in at the front gate at the event for additional information.  For more information about the North Recreational Complex, visit www.ecu.edu/crw or call (252) 328-1571.

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Griffith named Harriot College of Arts & Sciences distinguished professor

East Carolina University anthropology professor Dr. David Griffith was named distinguished professor for the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences during the college’s annual faculty convocation Aug. 19.

Griffith

Griffith

Griffith was the 15th individual selected for the honor, traditionally awarded at the beginning of each academic year. The award is conferred upon a professor whose career exemplifies a commitment to and a love for knowledge and academic life, as demonstrated by outstanding teaching and advising, research, creative productivity and professional service.

“I have always loved my work at ECU, in large part because of the many fine faculty members …that I have had the good fortune to work with,” Griffith said.

“Early in my career, Keats Sparrow once said to me, ‘You are a good citizen of this university, David.’ At the time, I don’t believe I gave his remark the thought it deserved, but as I have grown older I have come to appreciate what good citizenship means in a university that has become a dynamic, driving force in Eastern North Carolina.”

Griffith is interim director of the ECU Institute for Coastal Science and Policy. He is recognized for his research on labor migration, the decline of traditional fisheries and the effect of that decline on the economic wellbeing of the state’s coastal communities. Griffith has authored or co-authored 35 peer-reviewed journal articles, 25 articles in edited volumes, 21 technical reports, and eight books. He has been a primary investigator or co-investigator on more than 50 research grants totaling $7.1 million.

He is a member of the Southern Coastal Heritage Committee, American Anthropological Association, American Ethnological Society, Society for the Anthropology of Work, Rural Sociological Society, Association for Consumer Research, American Academy of Poets, and the Modern Poetry Association. He is a fellow of the Society for Applied Anthropology and associate editor for the journal, American Anthropologist.

Griffith earned his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Florida and his master’s and bachelor’s degrees in anthropology from the University of Iowa. He joined the ECU faculty in 1984 and was named senior scientist in the ECU Institute for Coastal Science and Policy in 2001.

For additional information, contact Griffith at 252-328-1748 or griffithd@ecu.edu.

 

 

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Joyner Library responds to student demand with trial 24/5 schedule

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Joyner Library is responding to student demand with a trial 24/5 operating schedule for the 2013-14 academic year.

Beginning August 19 and continuing through the spring semester, Joyner Library will be open 24 hours a day, 5 days a week.

This pilot initiative is a result of student demand for expanded hours to work on assignments, use library resources, collaborate on group projects and complete an array of other academic tasks. With the extended hours, the library will open at 10 a.m. on Sunday and remain open until closing at 9 p.m. on Friday.

After 11 p.m., an ECU OneCard is required for entry.  At 2 a.m. the basement, second and third floors will be closed for housekeeping and reduced staffing, while the first floor will remain open overnight. The second and third floors will reopen at 7:30 a.m.  Security staff will be present during all operating hours.

Mark Sanders, assistant director for Public Services, said, “We are committed to being responsive to our patrons’ needs and 24 hour access is one of the requests we most frequently receive from students.  We will monitor the hourly building use data during the overnight period of the fall and spring semesters to see if it supports making 24/5 access permanent.  I’m hopeful it will.”

Joyner Library’s complete operating hours can be found at http://www.ecu.edu/cs-lib/libhours.cfm.  Operating hours are reduced during breaks, intercession periods and summer semesters.  For more information, contact Mark Sanders at sandersm@ecu.edu.

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Joyner Library faculty, staff report professional activities

Faculty in J.Y. Joyner Library has reported publications and professional activities as follows:

Publications

Article by David Hursh and Christine Avenarius (Anthropology), “What Do Patrons Really Do in Music Libraries? An Ethnographic Approach to Improving Library Services,” in Music Reference Services Quarterly.

Article by Katy Kavanagh, “Incorporating cartoons in an academic library: Spicing up LibGuides graphically at East Carolina University,” in College and Research Libraries News.

An article by Mark Sanders, “Creating a safe haven for university students:  How are we doing?” in the Journal of Access Services.

An article by Linda Teel, “Transforming Space in the Curriculum Materials Center,” in Education Libraries. Teel received The Order of the Long Leaf Pine from Gov. Pat McCrory on June 5.

An article by Virginia Bacon and Patrick L. Carr, “Assessing Value Through Cross-Institutional Comparisons: A Discussion of the 2012 University of North Carolina System-Wide E-Journal Survey,” in Serials Review.

An article by Lisa Barricella, Eleanor Cook, Robert James, Jan Mayo, Mark Sanders and Ralph Scott, “E-book readers come to eastern North Carolina,” in North Carolina Libraries.

Presentations and professional activities

Katy Kavanagh moderated a panel at the American Library Association conference for the distance learning section of ACRL called, “Is it Worth It? Assessing Online Instruction.”

Katy Kavanagh and Jeanne Hoover presented a poster session for ACRL’s science and technology section at the American Libraries Association conference titled,  “Universal Design for Learning, the Library and STEM: Common Cause, Uncommon Ground.”

Presentation by Kavanagh and Angela Whitehurst, “How May We Serve You? Libraries, Hospitality Management and the Creation of Leaders,” for the LAUNC-CH Research Forum (Librarian’s Association at UNC Chapel Hill).

Presentation by Kavanagh, Whitehurst and Mark Sanders, “Connect with a right JAB:  Joyner Library and Blackboard,”  for the Think-in:  A Teaching with Technology Showcase in Greenville.

Presentation by Mark Sanders and Angela Whitehurst, “Don’t be Lost in Space:  Assess, Renovate, and Repurpose your Library,” for the North Carolina Library Association in Thomasville, N.C.

A presentation by Alan Bailey, “An Overview of Stephen Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective People” to librarians at Appalachian Regional Public Library System’s Professional Development Day in Boone.

A presentation by Cindy Shirkey and Lisa Barricella, “Adding a use factor measure to a materials allocation plan for books in an academic library” at the Acquisitions Institute at Timberline Lodge.

Invited presentation by Bryna R. Coonin, “Come to Your Census: the development of the U.S. Census from its inception to the present,” for the North Carolina Library Association Government Resources Section.

Presentation by William Gee, “Making Space for Interlibrary Loan: Space Survey Results and Renovation Tips” at the ILLiad International Conference in March.

 

 

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