Heart teams vital for patient care success

Dr. Michael J. Mack

Dr. Michael J. Mack

By Doug Boyd
ECU News Services

One of the nation’s leading heart surgeons says cardiologists and surgeons should work together as teams to provide the best options and care for patients with cardiovascular disease – an approach that’s already in use at East Carolina University.

Dr. Michael J. Mack, medical director of cardiovascular surgery at Baylor Scott & White Health and chairman of The Heart Hospital at the Baylor Plano Research Center, both in Dallas, spoke Wednesday at the East Carolina Heart Institute at ECU.

Mack emphasized the need for hospitals to align economically with practitioners and the need for transparency in payment systems, since payment models will be based on the best clinical outcomes. He also noted the need for new ways of teaching younger medical professionals to ensure mastery of surgical techniques.

Mack was speaking at the 12th annual Will Camp Sealy Lecture in Cardiothoracic Surgery. Approximately 250 health care professionals and students attended.

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ECU music student wins two orchestra competitions

Mary Catherine Cox

Mary Catherine Cox

Mary Catherine Cox, ECU junior violin performance major studying with Ara Gregorian, won both the Raleigh Symphony Orchestra and the Durham Symphony Orchestra concerto competitions Jan. 11.

She recently won the 2013-14 ECU Concerto Competition Ron and Patty Allison Prize, and the opportunity to perform as soloist with the ECU Symphony Orchestra.
Cox has been awarded All-State Honors Orchestra and has attended the Music Teacher’s National Association state auditions and international music festivals in France, England, and Italy.

Last summer Cox was awarded a fellowship to study at the Madeline Island Chamber Music Festival in Wisconsin. She will perform with the Raleigh Symphony Feb. 23 and the Durham Symphony April 6.

She studies piano with ECU’s Keiko Sekino. Her older sister, Caroline Cox, who graduated in 2012, also is an accomplished violinist. Younger sister Sarah Cox is majoring in music. They are the daughters of optometrists Carson and Valerie Cox of Southern Pines.

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ECU senior to help manage Super Bowl social media

ECU business major Sarah Moran will travel to Manhattan for Super Bowl week to help manage Super Bowl social media. (Contributed photos)

ECU business major Sarah Moran will travel to Manhattan for Super Bowl week to help manage Super Bowl social media. (Contributed photos)

By Joy Holster
ECU News Services

East Carolina University senior Sarah Moran will be among the millions of travelers making their way to Manhattan for Super Bowl week, but she’s not planning to attend the game.

Moran has landed a role as a social media communication center listener for the NFL and the Super Bowl Host Committee. She will work alongside approximately 20 to 30 other volunteers managing Super Bowl-related social media. Her job includes monitoring the buzz on social media outlets and responding to questions, comments or concerns people may have about their Super Bowl experience.

Sarah Moran visited Manhattan in November for the Advertising Women of New York Conference. At a sports marketing workshop there, she first heard about the opportunity to volunteer with Super Bowl social media. She will return to Times Square to work as a social media communication center listener for the NFL and the Super Bowl Host Committee.

Sarah Moran visited Manhattan in November for the Advertising Women of New York Conference. At a sports marketing workshop there, she first heard about the opportunity to volunteer with the NFL for Super Bowl social media. She will return to Times Square to work as a social media communication center listener for the NFL and the Super Bowl Host Committee.

She will work four 6-hour shifts Jan. 28 through Jan. 31 at Super Bowl Boulevard in Times Square.

Moran, a business major with concentrations in marketing and management, said she was excited about the opportunity for this unique mass media experience. “The Super Bowl is light years larger than any Twitter/social media experience I’ve had before,” she said.

She also expects the experience to help advance her career. Following graduation from ECU this May, Moran plans to attend graduate school in marketing, with a goal of combining advertising and social media skills in a future career.

She credits her interest in social media to ECU College of Business professor Tracy Tuten. “I’ve loved her work with social media and advertising,” Moran said. “She has really opened my eyes to the possibilities I have. She’s the reason I want to go into advertising.”

Tuten also helped arrange Moran’s accommodations for the Manhattan visit. She will stay with a recent ECU graduate in the Upper West Side.

Moran is chair of ECU’s Student Media Board and a member of the executive board for the Students’ Treasure Chest. She is a member of the ECU Women’s Roundtable, the Lambda Iota Chapter of the Phi Mu Fraternity, the Omicron Delta Kappa and the National Residence Hall Honorary.

 

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Online programs at ECU ranked “Best Buy” in nation

By Crystal Baity
ECU News Services

Eight programs at East Carolina University have been ranked a “Best Buy” for students seeking a high quality, affordable online degree in a new listing by GetEducated.com.

Three ECU online bachelor’s degree programs were included: hospitality management ranked first, health services management ranked second and business administration ranked third. Five ECU online master’s degree programs were listed: technology systems, software engineering and library science ranked first, education ranked second and the MBA ranked third.

GetEducated.com is a consumer agency that publishes online college and university ratings based on quality, cost and credibility through independent review and comparison to peer institutions in a national survey, according to their website.

New MBA rankings will be released at the end of the month, said Melissa Eubank, director of information services at the agency.

“College degree costs have reached critical levels. East Carolina University is a national model for how education technology coupled with innovative fiscal policies will help solve the national crisis of college affordability while providing credible higher education credentials,” said Vicky Phillips, founder of GetEducated.com.

Following are links to the ECU programs recognized:

Best Online MBA AACSB (Rank #3)
http://www.geteducated.com/online-college-ratings-and-rankings/best-buy-lists/best-buy-online-masters-mba-aacsb

Best Online Masters Computer Science & Information Technology (Rank #1)
http://www.geteducated.com/online-college-ratings-and-rankings/best-buy-lists/online-masters-computer-science-it-degree

Best Online Masters Engineering (Rank #1)
http://www.geteducated.com/online-college-ratings-and-rankings/best-buy-lists/best-buy-masters-engineering

Best Online Masters Education (Rank #2)
http://www.geteducated.com/online-college-ratings-and-rankings/best-buy-lists/best-buy-online-masters-of-education

Best Online Masters Library Science (Rank #1)
http://www.geteducated.com/online-college-ratings-and-rankings/best-buy-lists/affordable-online-library-science-masters-degrees

Best Online Bachelors Business (Rank #3)
http://www.geteducated.com/online-college-ratings-and-rankings/best-buy-lists/best-buy-online-bachelor-business-management

Best Online Bachelors Management (Rank #1)
http://www.geteducated.com/online-college-ratings-and-rankings/best-buy-lists/best-buy-online-bachelor-management

Best Online Bachelors Healthcare (Rank #1)
http://www.geteducated.com/online-college-ratings-and-rankings/best-buy-lists/best-buy-online-bachelors-healthcare

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In Memoriam – James Davenport

A familiar face around campus, James Davenport is shown at right during a reception for fellow ECU employee Nellie Taylor. (Contributed photo)

A familiar face around campus, James Davenport is shown at right during a reception for fellow ECU employee Nellie Taylor. (Contributed photo)

James Davenport from the East Carolina University Department of Materials Management died Jan. 21 after a lengthy illness.

He had worked with ECU for 25 years. Many faculty and staff came to know Davenport as the person who delivered office supplies for Central Stores and Receiving.

He also worked with Event One at athletic events and concerts at ECU venues for a number of years. He was also an avid Pirate fan.

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Civil rights activist to speak at ECU

Civil Rights activist Julian Bond will return to East Carolina University this month to deliver the Lawrence F. Brewster Lecture in History as part of the 2013-14 Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series. As pictured above, Bond also appeared at ECU in September 1970. (Photo courtesy of ECU Archives)

Civil Rights activist Julian Bond will return to East Carolina University this month to deliver the Lawrence F. Brewster Lecture in History as part of the 2013-14 Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series. As pictured above, seated at left, Bond also appeared at ECU in September 1970. (Photo courtesy of ECU Archives)

Julian Bond, civil rights activist and professor emeritus of the Corcoran Department of History at the University of Virginia, will deliver the Lawrence F. Brewster Lecture in History at East Carolina University.

Julian Bond

Julian Bond

Bond will discuss “Civil Rights, Then and Now,” at 7 p.m. Jan. 28 in ECU’s Wright Auditorium. The presentation is part of the 2013-14 Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series. A question and answer session will immediately follow the presentation.

Bond is distinguished professor in residence in the Department of Government at the American University in Washington, D.C., He is also known as an activist in the civil rights, economic justice and peace movements. In 1960, he helped organize the Atlanta University Center Committee on Appeal for Human Rights, which directed several years of non-violent protests, and by 1962, won integration of Atlanta’s movie theaters, lunch counters and parks.

He served for two decades in the Georgia House and Georgia Senate, drafting more than 60 bills that became law. In 1968, Bond became the first African American to be nominated for the vice presidency of the United States.

He has received the American Civil Liberties Union Bill of Rights Awards from Massachusetts and Georgia, and was named one of America’s Top 200 Leaders by Time magazine. He holds 25 honorary degrees.

Dr. John A. Tucker, director of the Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series, said that Bond’s lecture honors Greenville physicians Dr. Andrew Best, Dr. Fred Irons, Dr. Malene Irons, Dr. Ray Minges and Dr. Earl Trevathan for their contributions to the social health of ECU and the Greenville community. “These physicians led the movement to desegregate Pitt County Memorial Hospital, now Vidant, in the early 1960s,” Tucker said.

To make a contribution to the series, or for additional information, contact Tucker at 252-328-1028, or via email at tuckerjo@ecu.edu. Additional information is also available at http://www.ecu.edu/voyages.

bond1

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Nutrition students develop their professional leadership styles

Students detail their  analyses of Pitt County areas to Sandra Spann (left), president of Food Systems Consultants. Spann was one of the experts who spoke with the class during their project designed to enhance leadership skills. (Contributed photo)

Students detail their analyses of Pitt County areas to Sandra Spann (left), president of Food Systems Consultants. Spann was one of the experts who spoke with the class during their project designed to enhance leadership skills. (Contributed photos)

By Nicole Wood
College of Human Ecology

East Carolina University nutrition science professor Brenda Bertrand engaged 35 students last semester in a project designed to enhance their leadership skills.

Bertrand

Bertrand

The students teamed up to conduct “windshield tours” of Pitt County, using photography to document their research. The students examined health issues including whether areas were equipped for walkers or bikers and whether grocery stores or convenience stores were in close proximity to neighborhoods and schools.

Students then considered the implications of their findings and what those results would mean for the studied locations, which included Farmville, Chicod, Grimesland, Ayden and Stokes. They developed diagrams to chart the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) in those areas.

When the teams shared their diagrams with the entire class, a trend emerged. “They began to notice similarities between the different communities,” said Elizabeth Kroeger, graduate assistant for the course. “They each saw limited access to fresh fruits and vegetables with community and geographical constraints for shopping (distance or lack of grocery stores) and transportation (lack of sidewalks).” The teams then collaborated to combine their findings into an SWOT diagram for all of Pitt County.

Representatives from the studied communities visited the class to help students develop new ideas and intervention plans that are feasible for real-world application. Nutrition experts worked with the students throughout the process and visited campus to share their perspectives on the students’ plans.

Graduate student Elizabeth Kroeger, left, is gathering data from the nutrition students' project as part of her own research project. Kroeger is pictured with one of the students at the Pitt County Boy’s and Girl’s Clubs, where she also works.

Graduate student Elizabeth Kroeger, left, is gathering data from the nutrition students’ project as part of her own research project. Kroeger is pictured with one of the students at the Pitt County Boy’s and Girl’s Clubs, where she also works.

The students created a blog detailing their project and their own understanding of leadership in rural health. Along the way, students read articles regarding transformative leadership – a type of leadership that has ideal traits for working within the nutrition field. They answered questions about the articles on their blogs. Students also took questionnaires that identified their leadership traits at the beginning and end of the project.

While the students gathered data on the communities, Kroeger gathered details on the students’ learning process and leadership transformation. She will use the data for a graduate research project to determine whether the students’ leadership styles changed throughout the project.

“The qualitative research we collected of the students’ perspectives on the leadership projects (and) leadership in general will be used to prepare a manuscript for a journal submission in 2014,” said Kroeger. “Hopefully, our research will give professors in the field of nutrition insight into how to effectively develop leadership skills among their students.”

The project was sponsored in part by a BB&T Leadership Grant. Those grants aim to advance ECU’s culture of service and its place as a leadership development community by encouraging and assisting units across campus to embed leadership development components into their courses and programs.

 

 

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ECU sonographer receives national award

Diana McCormick Strickland, a sonographer at East Carolina University, has received the

Strickland

Strickland

2014 Distinguished Sonographer Award from the American Institute of Ultrasound Medicine.

She is a registered diagnostic cardiac sonographer and a registered diagnostic medical sonographer. She works in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Brody School of Medicine, where she is a clinical assistant professor and co-director of ultrasound in the division of maternal-fetal medicine.

Strickland specializes in high-risk obstetric ultrasound and fetal echocardiography.

Strickland has an associate degree from Caldwell Community College, a bachelor’s degree from ECU and a certificate in advanced radiologic technology from Duke University.

Sonographers operate ultrasonic imaging devices to produce diagnostic images, scans, videos or 3-D volumes of data.

The award will be presented at the 2104 AIUM annual convention March 29-April 2 in Las Vegas.

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Grad Expo set for early February

Dowdy Student Store will host a Grad Expo for May 2014 graduates from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Feb. 4 and 5 and from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Feb. 6 at the student store in the Wright Building on campus.

Graduating seniors can pick up caps and gowns; register for graduation; and order class rings, custom invitations, announcements and thank-you notes. Jostens, the official provider of class rings for ECU, will have samples of class rings, and representatives can help with finger sizing and original designs.

The Pirate Club, Alumni Association, Career Center, Campus Recreation and College of  Education Office of Alternative Licensure will be on hand with offers and information. Jostens has donated three $100 gas cards that will be given away in a drawing. All May 2014 graduates are invited to enter; no purchase is necessary.

Graduating seniors unable to attend the Expo can visit Dowdy Student Stores after Feb. 6 to pick up their caps and gowns.

For more information about the Expo, call 252-328-6731 or visit www.studentstores.ecu.edu.

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