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ECU faculty, students to present at conference

Pictured left to right are graduate students Marianne Ayers, Benjamin Wigand, Miranda Guardiola, Anne Saville and Andrea Fulle. (Photo provided by Maria McDonald, teaching instructor of sociology)

Pictured left to right are graduate students Marianne Ayers, Benjamin Wigand, Miranda Guardiola, Anne Saville and Andrea Fulle. (Photo provided by Maria McDonald, teaching instructor of sociology)

East Carolina University will be well represented at the 78th Annual Meeting of the Southern Sociological Society in New Orleans March 25-28.

Presenting at the event are four Department of Sociology faculty members, 10 graduate students, five undergraduates and two alumni.

Several ECU presenters will participate in paper, roundtable and poster sessions to discuss research focusing on gender inequality, including sexual assault. Others are presenting research on a broad range of topics including social impacts of the digital divide, mysogynoir, the impact of student volunteer work, North Carolina’s environmental movement and attitudes toward the Confederate flag.

This year’s meeting theme is “Stalled Revolutions? Gender Inequality in the 21st Century.”

For additional information, contact Marieke Van Willigen, interim chair of sociology, at 252-328-6092 or vanwilligenm@ecu.edu.

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Alumni Association announces 27 scholarship recipients

The East Carolina Alumni Association has announced the 2015-2016 Alumni Scholarship recipients. Twenty-seven recipients will be awarded a total of $46,500.

Since 2005, the alumni association has awarded 224 scholarships totaling more than $302,000. Alumni Scholarships are given to full-time undergraduates at ECU who demonstrate leadership, volunteer service, and academic excellence. Each spring, the alumni association awards approximately 25 scholarships in amounts of $1,000 or $2,500 for the following academic year.

Alumni Scholarships are funded by proceeds from the association’s ECU Alumni Scholarship Classic golf tournament each fall and the Pirate Alumni Road Race and Fun Run each spring, as well as generous donations from alumni and friends.

The scholars will be honored at a luncheon April 25. Recipients include the following (italics indicate a second-time Alumni Scholarship recipient):

East Carolina Alumni Association Scholarship ($2,500)

  • Keith Winston Dunbar of Greenville, NC; exercise physiology major
  • Darcy Harrington-Brown Dupree of Raleigh, NC; nursing major
  • Zachary Hammer Evans of Asheville, NC; psychology major
  • Marisa Michele Giglio of Marlborough, MA; criminal justice major
  • Annaliese Sutton Gillette of Greenville, NC; hospitality management major
  • Lucas Thade Hopkins of Greenville, NC; biology major
  • Madison Shea Parsons of Charlotte, NC; marketing major
  • Kirsti Holthe Robertson of Charlotte, NC; nutrition and dietetics major
  • Emma Nicole Shirley of Cary, NC; exercise physiology and Hispanic studies double-major
  • Kathryn “Katie” Elizabeth Stanley of Greenville, NC; political science major
  • Maya Lawann Williams of Greensboro, NC; social work and English double-major

East Carolina Alumni Association Scholarship in memory of Yvonne Pearce ’82 ($2,500)

  • Najee Jalice Brown of Charlotte, NC; communication and entrepreneurship double-major

East Carolina Teachers College (ECTC) Scholarship ($1,000)

  • Emery Elizabeth Bulla of Asheboro, NC; speech and hearing sciences major
  • Jessica Nicole Buss of Fayetteville, NC; applied sociology major
  • Amber Madison Heere-MacLeod of Douglassville, PA; elementary education major
  • Mackenzie Elise McNamara of Charlotte, NC; family community services major
  • Stephanie Maria Morales of Rocky Mount, NC; exercise physiology major
  • Jordan Bethany Thomas of Boone, NC; art major
  • Matthew G. Vogel of Morganville, NJ; management major

Donald Y. Leggett ’58, ’62 Alumni Scholarship ($1,000)

  • Amanda L. Blakley of White Plains, MD; birth-kindergarten teacher education major
  • Danielle T. Holdner of Holly Springs, NC; child life major

Mary Jo Outland Baugh ’55 Alumni Scholarship ($2,500)

  • Erika M. Dietrick of Greenville, NC; biology major

Megan Grace Lavinder Memorial Scholarship ($1,000)

  • Aenia Saad Amin of Greensboro, NC; multidisciplinary studies and Hispanic studies double-major

New York Metro Alumni Chapter Scholarship ($1,000)

  • Michelle K. Gianvito of North Brunswick, NJ; business and marketing education major

Pitt County Chapter Scholarship ($1,000)

  • Lauren Elizabeth Frye of Woodbridge, VA; finance major

Tidewater Virginia Alumni Chapter Scholarship ($1,000)

  • Brianna Blaise Ingram of Virginia Beach, VA; elementary education major

Washington/Metro Alumni Scholarship ($1,000)

  • Keira Rachelle Harris of Bowie, MD; finance major
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ECU Alum: Treating Ebola ‘an experience that few can imagine’

Adams, right, inspects the protective gear worn by another U.S. Public Health Service officer before the officer enters the Ebola treatment unit outside Monrovia, Liberia. (Photo courtesy U.S. Public Health Service Service)

Adams, right, inspects the protective gear worn by another U.S. Public Health Service officer before the officer enters the Ebola treatment unit outside Monrovia, Liberia. (Photo courtesy U.S. Public Health Service Service)

 

Daniel Adams, a 1999 ECU graduate, could have chosen to remain in his white-collar job overseeing management effectiveness programs at Environmental Protection Agency labs in Research Triangle Park and four other locations. Instead, he resigned that post to travel half a world away to help fight the Ebola crisis in Liberia.

Now a lieutenant commander in the U.S. Public Health Service, Adams has served since February as the preventative medicine officer at the Monrovia Medical Unit located about 30 miles outside the Liberian capitol.

The 25-bed hospital provided by the U.S. Defense Department opened last November. It is the only U.S. government-funded medical facility in Liberia.

“We have mainly focused on treating healthcare workers who have contracted Ebola so they can get back on the front lines of treating their fellow countrymen,” Adams said. “We have celebrated life and mourned the loss of life over the past couple of months.”

The Public Health Service “has allowed me to be part of a strong mission with positive effects worldwide,” he said. “Helping treat the Ebola patients in Liberia has been an experience that few can imagine.”

The Monrovia Medical Unit, which was built to care for medical workers who become infected with the Ebola virus, sits about 30 miles outside Liberia's capital. The 25-bed facility recently treated what officials hope will be its last Ebola-positive patient. (Photo courtesy U.S. Army)

The Monrovia Medical Unit, which was built to care for medical workers who become infected with the Ebola virus, sits about 30 miles outside Liberia’s capital. The 25-bed facility recently treated what officials hope will be its last Ebola-positive patient. (Photo courtesy U.S. Army)

He said a highlight of his service came recently when MMU staff treated what they hope will be the last Ebola-positive patient in the country.

A native of Greenville, Adams served in the Army after graduation and worked overseas as a civilian military employee. He also did postgraduate work at Anna Maria College in Massachusetts.

“I remember a leader in (the Public Health Service Officer Basic Course) telling me that we are here to ‘serve the underserved.’ I took that to heart.”

He said those words made an impression on him because that’s what he learned at ECU. “I feel it is important for everyone associated with ECU to hear how we reach around the world to help serve the unserved populations.”

Volunteering to serve at the Ebola clinic isn’t the first time Adams has sought out new experiences. “At my wedding reception in the Philippines, I requested that we have food indigenous to the area. I got what I wished for – bat!”

– Steve Tuttle

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Sex, seduction in Donne’s poetry topic of final Voyages lecture

Williams College professor of English Dr. Illona Bell will present “Sex and Seduction in John Donne’s Poetry” at 7 p.m. March 24 in Bate 1032, East Carolina University.

Bell

Bell

The event is free and no tickets are required.

Bell is the Samuel Fessenden Clark Professor of English at Williams College, with expertise in Renaissance literature, Shakespeare, Elizabeth I, early modern women writers, lyric poetry and Virginia Woolf. She is the author of “Elizabeth I: The Voice of a Monarch,” “Elizabethan Women and the Poetry of Courtship” and numerous essays on Renaissance poetry and early modern women. She also edited “John Donne: Selected Poems.”

Bell received her Ph.D. in literature from Boston College in 1977 and her B.A. in literature from Radcliffe College in 1969. Her presentation concludes the 2014-15 Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series.

For additional information about the Voyages series and its speakers, visit www.ecu.edu/voyages. More information about Harriot College is available at www.ecu.edu/cas.

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ECU Alumni Association names award winners

The East Carolina Alumni Association has announced the recipients of the 2015 Robert H. Wright Alumni Leadership Award. These five students will be presented with the award during commencement ceremonies on Friday, May 8.

The most prestigious award for undergraduates at East Carolina University, the Wright award recognizes academic achievement, service to both the university and community, and demonstrated leadership. Recipients are recognized as those who will make a positive impact on their respective professions and communities.

In addition to receiving the Wright medallion at commencement, recipients are given a lifetime membership in the East Carolina Alumni Association.

Recipients are:

  • Ajay Ajmera of Greenville, NC; biology and chemistry double-major
  • Matthew Ryan Baucom of Marshville, NC; chemistry and biochemistry double-major
  • Jessica Katlyn Jewell of Clayton, NC; communication major
  • Shayna Nitin Mooney of Winterville, NC; neuroscience and international studies double-major
  • Kristi Noelle Wilkerson of Mastic, NY; nutrition major.

 

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Workshops to focus on veterans, military

CWS Brian Turner

 

East Carolina University’s Contemporary Writer Series will host a three-day series of workshops for veterans, military service members and military families March 25 – 27.

All events are free and open to the public. The series will focus on expressing experiences through fiction, non-fiction or visual art. Participants may also wish to contribute to a new publication, The ECU Veterans Anthology.

Veteran poet and essayist Brian Turner will open the series at 7:30 p.m. March 25 in the East Carolina Heart Institute auditorium. Turner will read from his work and discuss his experiences as infantry team leader for the 3 rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team in Iraq from 2003-2004. He is the author of “Here Bullet” (2005), “Phantom Noise” (2010) and “My Life as a Foreign Country” (2014).

A book signing and question and answer session will immediately follow.

A poetry reading at 7 p.m. March 26 in the Greenville Museum of art will feature award-winning poet Ilyse Kusnetz and former North Carolina poet laureate Joseph Bathanti. A book signing and question and answer session will follow readings from both poets’ work.

Kusnetz teaches at Valencia College and lives in Orlando, Fla., with her husband, poet and memoirist Brian Turner. She holds a Ph.D. in feminist and postcolonial British literature from the University of Edinburgh and an M.A. in creative writing from Syracuse University. Bathanti is a professor of creative writing at Appalachian State University and the 2012 state poet laureate. His writings focus on veterans and their families. His honors include the Sam Ragan Fine Arts Award, the Carolina Novel Award and the Linda Flowers Literary Award from the N.C. Humanities Council.

A full listing of events and registration is available at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/veteran-writers-workshop-tickets-15846084064.

For additional information about the workshops, contact Jason Faulkner, teaching instructor in the Department of English, at 252-328-5177 or faulknerj@ecu.edu. For additional information about the events featuring Turner, Kusnetz or Bathanti, contact John Hoppenthaler, associate professor of English, at 252-328-5562; hoppenthalerj@ecu.edu, or Thomas Douglass, associate professor of English, at 252-328-6723; douglasst@ecu.edu.

The workshops are cosponsored by Operation Re-Entry North Carolina, Office of Student Transitions, Pirate Veterans and the Office of the Provost.

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Rogers Awarded Technology Transfer Scholarship

East Carolina University Technology Transfer Fellow Dr. Carlyle Rogers, a 2013 graduate of the Brody School of Medicine, was honored for creativity and innovation in his career.

Carlyle Rogers

Carlyle Rogers

Rogers, of Williamston, was awarded the 2015 Howard Bremer Scholarship by the Association of University Technology Managers. The award supports students and professionals new to the field by covering the cost of travel and registration at the organization’s annual meeting.

Rogers attended the organization’s 2015 conference in New Orleans, where he focused his attention on crowdfunding, licensing and valuation of university technologies and copyright issues related to mobile applications and software.

As a technology transfer fellow at ECU, Rogers supports promising new inventions and promotes the university’s culture of innovation and entrepreneurism. “In every university there exists new and revolutionary inventions,” he said, but proper execution is critical to get the inventions from the idea to a commercial product.

“That is where technology transfer becomes important; it serves as the vehicle for executing the development of university inventions to commercial products,” Rogers said.

The role ECU plays in supporting technology transfer is critical because so many eastern North Carolina counties face a declining population, with potential leaders moving away from the area instead of reinvesting in the region, he said.

“To change this pattern, ECU and eastern North Carolina must look to innovation and research as a means to create new industries, new jobs and a way to strengthen the economic fabric” of the region.

Rogers holds a Ph.D. in pharmacology and toxicology from the Brody School of Medicine and a B.S. in biology from ECU.

For additional information on ECU’s Office of Technology Transfer, contact Marti Van Scott, director of the Office of Technology Transfer, at 252-328-9545 or vanscottm@ecu.edu.

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