Author Jayne Anne Phillips to read from new work Thursday

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Author Jayne Anne Phillips will read from her new novel “Quiet Dell” at the Greenville Museum of Art at 7:30 p.m. Thursday. The reading is part of the East Carolina University Contemporary Writers Series and is free and open to the public.

Stephen King has said, “In a brilliant fusion of fact and fiction, Jayne Anne Phillips has written the novel of the year. It’s the story of a serial killer’s crimes and capture, yes, but it’s also a compulsively readable story of how one brave woman faces up to acts of terrible violence in order to create something good and strong in the aftermath. ‘Quiet Dell’ will be compared to ‘In Cold Blood,’ but Phillips offers something Capote could not: a heroine who lights up the dark places and gives us hope in our humanity.”

Phillips’ novels address the social and historical tensions that challenge American families, including such subjects as war and domestic violence. Her debut novel “Machine Dreams” (1984) chronicles a family from the Depression to the Vietnam War, and their story is revealed through the thoughts and memories of each family member. Her fourth novel, “Lark and Termite,” was a finalist for the National Book Award in 2009.

Phillips is the director of the master of fine arts program at Rutgers University-Newark. She previously taught at Harvard University, Williams College and Boston University.

The Contemporary Writers Services is housed in the ECU Department of English, Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences.

For more information, contact Thomas Douglass, Contemporary Writers Series committee member and associate professor of English, at 252-328-6723 or douglasst@ecu.edu.

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ECU Police to conduct active shooter training July 8-12

The East Carolina University Police Department will conduct active shooter training July 8-12 at Tyler Hall on College Hill.

This training, a normal part of ECU’s emergency planning procedures, is designed to prepare law enforcement personnel to respond to an active shooter on campus. Tyler Hall will be the only building involved in the training scenarios.

According to the ECU Police, the exercise may involve actors and simulated use of weapons.

Students, faculty, staff and visitors are encouraged to avoid the Tyler Hall area between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m., July 8-12, if possible.

Contact Lt. Chris Sutton with ECU Police with questions about the training at 737-7433.

 

 

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ECU community mourns loss of instructor

By Kathryn Kennedy and Jeannine Manning Hutson
ECU News Services

Co-workers and students of East Carolina University teaching instructor Debbie O’Neal are grieving this week following her death March 31.

She and her husband – both rated pilots – were killed when their fixed-wing Lancair LC-42 aircraft crashed in a Winston-Salem residential neighborhood after experiencing engine trouble, a National Traffic Safety Board official told media on Monday.

Funeral services are scheduled for 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 3 at Rock Springs Center, 4025 N.C. Highway 43 N, Greenville.

An additional memorial service was held Tuesday, April 2 at the Washington Eye Center, where her husband, Dennis, worked.

O’Neal came to ECU in 2004, and this semester she was teaching three sections of English composition in the classroom and two distance-education sections of English grammar.

Department of English Chair Jeffrey Johnson spent Tuesday meeting with students in O’Neal’s classes, accompanied by staff from the ECU counseling center. He said the students were “taking it hard,” and many asked if they could reach out to her family.

“Her students know how invested she was in them,” Johnson said. “She was really outgoing, full of energy and ideas, generous with her time. All these qualities of hers…make (the loss) even harder.”

O’Neal was very involved in the ECU Language Academy, which provides intensive English-language instruction to international students and professionals. She also worked with the College of Education by developing ways to integrate English as a second language (ESL) teacher education into existing curriculum.

Marjorie Ringler, associate professor in the College of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership, said she and O’Neal worked closely for years. “We were inseparable at work and as friends as well,” Ringler said Tuesday.

O’Neal was a linguist and Ringler works on partnerships with principals and school districts; together they were a great team, Ringler said. The pair recently attended an international conference in Dallas, presenting their success in teaching English as a second language in a rural eastern North Carolina school.

O’Neal engaged her classroom students as well, Ringler said, and held them to high standards.

“In the Department of English, she saw her students as her kids,” Ringler continued. “She was a mother to them because (she taught) the freshman composition class.”

She added that O’Neal kept in touch with many students and would get Facebook and email messages about how she had changed their lives. “She made sure everybody knew that she cared,” Ringler said.

“She lived life to the fullest. She was a pilot, made her own jewelry, and was always in touch with her three kids. She skied as well. What did she not do? And she tackled everything head on.”

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Folger Shakespeare Library exhibit features ECU connections

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A replica of an Irish mantle, or cloak, created by East Carolina University School of Art and Design students in Robin Haller’s textile and design course is part of the exhibit at the Folger Shakespeare Library. Photo courtesy of the Folger Shakespeare Library.

By Alexa DeCarr, ECU News Services

An exhibit on display at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C., is showcasing the achievements of Dr. Thomas Herron, an associate professor of English at East Carolina University, students in ECU’s School of Art and Design and the University Multimedia Center.

The exhibit, which opened in January and runs through May 19, is named “Nobility and Newcomers in Renaissance Ireland” and focuses on the Irish upper class during the 16th to mid-17th century and its cultural exchanges with England. It investigates the political struggles of the period while acknowledging the ways in which English and Irish cultures influenced each other through achievements in literature, architecture and the arts.

“It goes beyond the black and white view of the interactions between the English and the Irish,” Herron said of the exhibit.

Students in ECU assistant professor Robin Haller’s textile and design course recreated a replica of an Irish mantle, which Herron said is a type of outer covering or cloak worn by the Irish. The University Multimedia Center also contributed to the exhibit by creating a 3-D computerized recreation of a tower house castle from the Middle Ages that allows viewers to get a virtual tour.

Herron said that a 16th century portrait of Queen Elizabeth I “discovered” in Manteo while hanging in plain sight during a conference organized by the ECU English Department is on display at the exhibit as well.

“ECU has been so generous and has played a major role in the exhibit,” Herron said. “Different departments within the university have gone out of their way to help with the exhibit.”

While the exhibit focuses on Europe during the Renaissance, Herron said modern Americans can still appreciate it.

“Shakespeare is a powerful influence on the U.S. and our culture,” he said. “And many Americans have Irish roots.”

The exhibit, “Nobility and Newcomers in Renaissance Ireland,” features portraits, manuscripts, artifacts, family records, and rare books drawn from collections in Ireland and the United States. The exhibition includes nearly 100 items from the Folger collection, as well as materials from the National Gallery of Ireland, the University of Wisconsin, the National Portrait Gallery, the National Library of Ireland, and private collections.

Brendan Kane, a historian of modern Ireland and an associate professor at the University of Connecticut, was the co-curator of the exhibit.

For more information on the exhibit, visit www.folger.edu/Ireland or contact Tom Herron at herront@ecu.edu.

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Reward announced for Dowdy-Ficklen vandalism information

ECU Police announced today that Pitt-Greenville Crimestoppers is offering up to $5,000 in reward funds for information leading to an arrest of two suspects who broke into and damaged Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium on Oct. 21.

Lt. Chris Sutton announced the Crimestoppers reward at a media briefing releasing photos taken from stadium surveillance video during the vandalism that occurred between 3 a.m. and 6:20 a.m. Oct. 21.

Approximately $35,000 in damage was done by three suspects.

Persons with information about the identity of the two individuals shown with former ECU student William J. Banks on the video should call Crimestoppers at 758-7777. Individuals are not asked for their names when reporting  information; they are identified through a code system. If the information leads to an arrest, the person could receive up to $5,000 in reward money.

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Reward announced for Dowdy-Ficklen vandalism information

ECU Police announced today that Pitt-Greenville Crimestoppers is offering up to $5,000 in reward funds for information leading to an arrest of two suspects who broke into and damaged Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium on Oct. 21.

Lt. Chris Sutton announced the Crimestoppers reward at a media briefing releasing photos taken from stadium surveillance video during the vandalism that occurred between 3 a.m. and 6:20 a.m. Oct. 21.

Approximately $35,000 in damage was done by three suspects.

Persons with information about the identity of the two individuals shown with former ECU student William J. Banks on the video should call Crimestoppers at 758-7777. Individuals are not asked for their names when reporting  information; they are identified through a code system. If the information leads to an arrest, the person could receive up to $5,000 in reward money.

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“Crossing Borders” event set for Oct. 25

East Carolina University’s Division of Health Sciences will host an interdisciplinary program, “Crossing Borders,” from 2 p.m. until 5 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 25 in the Brody School of Medicine Auditorium.

The event will bring students and faculty from each of the health sciences disciplines – allied health sciences, dental medicine, Laupus Library, medicine and nursing – together with a focus on collaboration in education. Approximately 300 students have been invited.

They will watch the film, “Crossing Borders,” a feature documentary directed by Arnd Wächter examining different cultures, hidden preconceptions and discovering oneself.

After the film, students will divide into small discussion groups to work with facilitators from each unit.

The event is sponsored by the offices of ECU Diversity and Dr. Phyllis Horns, vice chancellor for health sciences. Dr. Donna Lake from the College of Nursing has led the event planning group.

For more on the film, go to http://crossingbordersfilm.org/

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Spring art graduate lands solo exhibition in NYC

Omar Abbas will have a solo exhibit at the Berkeley Art Gallery in New York this month.

A recent ECU graduate has been chosen for a solo exhibition at the Berkeley Art Gallery in New York.

Omar Abbas’s new exhibition “Separation” will open this week at the Berkeley Art Gallery, located at 3 East 43rd St., New York. Abbas graduated from ECU in May 2012 with a bachelor of fine arts degree in studio art with an illustration concentration.

He will be presenting six paintings dealing with the idea of isolation and separation. The show will open Aug. 6 and continue to Aug. 31. An opening reception is set for Aug. 9.

For more information about the Abbas and to see his paintings, visit his website: http://www.omarpaints.com

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Toriello named chair of Dept. of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies

Paul Toriello

Dr. Paul Toriello has been named the new chair of the Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies at East Carolina University effective Aug. 1.

In the addictions and rehabilitation field since 1991, Toriello has worked as a paraprofessional, case manager and clinician. He also spent several years as the training director and then clinical director of a 108-bed residential facility serving adolescents with behavior disorders and substance abuse issues.

Toriello joined ECU in 2005 after four years at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center. He has directed the PhD program in rehabilitation counseling and administration since 2009, and has served as the College of Allied Health Sciences’ interim assistant dean for research grants since 2011. In the role of principal investigator, Toriello conceived and started an addictions treatment clinic in 2007, and developed it into a state-licensed substance abuse intensive outpatient program.

He has participated in more than $5 million in projects funded by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, National Institute on Drug Abuse, the U.S. Department of Defense and other agencies. He is president-elect of the American Rehabilitation Counseling Association.

Toriello earned his Doctor of Rehabilitation, specializing in substance related disorders, from the Rehabilitation Institute, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. He received a bachelor’s in psychology and master’s in rehabilitation counseling from Wright State University. He is a board-licensed clinical addictions specialist and a board-certified rehabilitation counselor and clinical supervisor.

Toriello replaces Dr. Lloyd Goodwin, who served as interim department chair for several years on two separate occasions.

Goodwin facilitated the new department name change to reflect its expanded emphasis; combined two graduate degree programs to improve their visibility and reflect current and future practice; and initiated the application for a new national accreditation to broaden student recruitment and employment markets for graduates, according to Dr. Stephen Thomas, dean of the College of Allied Health Sciences.

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