ECU grad publishes storybook for young adults

Cover

East Carolina University alumna Richelle Smallwood has published a book for young adults to encourage self-esteem and self-acceptance, particularly in the face of bullying and peer pressure.

Smallwood began work on the book, “Lost and Found: Journey to Self-Discovery,” as an assignment for an integrative seminar course with ECU professor Dr. Paige Averett in the School of Social Work.

Smallwood

Smallwood

She said she hopes the book will motivate her readers and the ECU students who hear about her accomplishment.

“I hope that youthful readers will become inspired and encouraged to be confident in who they are and only harbor positive thoughts about themselves,” she said.

At the same time, she said, “I would love to inspire current students by letting them know that their experience at ECU can go beyond the walls of a classroom.”

Published by Xulon Press, the book is available online through xulonpress.com/bookstore, amazon.com, and barnesandnoble.com.

Smallwood is a native of Bear Grass.

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Alumni Association accepting scholarship applications

Dominique Shane Rowe

Dominique Shane Rowe

ECU junior Dominique Shane Rowe, a rehabilitation studies major, is one of approximately 20 recipients of the 2013 Alumni Scholarships. The scholarships are awarded annually through the East Carolina Alumni Association.

Applications for the 2014-15 awards are being accepted through Jan. 31.

Approximately 20 scholarships of $1,000 and $2,500 are available to qualifying full-time undergraduates with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. Students must also demonstrate leadership and volunteer experience. Applications should be accompanied by one letter of recommendation.

Recipients must attend the acholarship luncheon on April 26 to receive their scholarship. The application form is available at PirateAlumni.com/Scholarships. For more information, contact Assistant Director for Alumni Programs Michael Kowalczyk  at 252-328-5557.

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Rimpf gets keys to new home

Dr. Glen Gilbert, interim vice chancellor for university advancement, presents ECU graduate and wounded warrior Nathan Rimpf with a Pirates helmet. (Photo by Emily Packard)

Dr. Glen Gilbert, interim vice chancellor for university advancement, presents ECU graduate and wounded warrior Nathan Rimpf with a Pirates helmet. (Photo by Emily Packard)

 

Wounded warrior Nathan Rimpf has moved into his new home in the Renaissance Park neighborhood in south Raleigh.

The traditional-style home, with a double porch and blue shutters, is the sixth home constructed by a partnership between the Home Builders Association of Raleigh-Wake County and the Triangle Veterans Association.

Four paratroopers who parachuted in as fireworks exploded delivered the keys to Rimpf’s new home.

Speaking to a large crowd of family and ECU friends at the key ceremony on Nov. 7, Rimpf said he does not regret his sacrifice. “This isn’t exactly what I dreamed – it’s way beyond that,” he said. “Look at this out here. Who wouldn’t give a pair of ugly feet to defend these people? It’s been a very awesome 487 days, to be honest.”

After graduating from ECU’s ROTC program, Rimpf became an Army Ranger. He stepped on an improvised explosive device while on patrol in Anbar Province and lost his lower legs.

Cadets from ECU’s ROTC program, including seniors who were freshmen when Rimpf was a senior, attended the ceremony. Glenn Gilbert, acting vice chancellor of university advancement, also spoke.

Rimpf walks easily on prosthetic legs but he said standing for long periods tires him. The stairs of his new home have a wheelchair lift.

Steve Tuttle

 

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Fulbright grant enables research, teaching in Costa Rica

ECU alumnus Stuart Kent, left, visits with children while in Costa Rica on a Fulbright grant. (Contributed photo)

ECU alumnus Stuart Kent, left, visits with children while in Costa Rica on a Fulbright grant. (Contributed photo)

Greenville furniture maker and ECU alumnus Stuart Kent ’08 returned last month from a year-long teaching and research project in Costa Rica underwritten by a Fulbright Core Grant.

He worked as a visiting assistant professor of sculpture at the National University of Costa Rica in Heredia. He taught workshops on wood joinery and finishing, and helped develop a curriculum for furniture design.

The project raised awareness of two species of sustainable, tropical hardwoods. Kent organized exhibitions to demonstrate possible uses for these two trees.

Since returning to the United States he has worked to connect timber growers in Costa Rica with American lumber dealers, opening a viable path to market for a cost effective and sustainable new raw material. Kent also organized the nation’s first major international public art event, after which the works by artists from seven nations were donated to the city of Heredia.

Kent was assisted in his work by his wife, Susan Kent ’04.

 

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Ted Hollingsworth ’79 named first Legacy Parent of the Year

Pictured at the Pirate Alumni Legacy Brunch are, left to right, current ECU student Kayla Hollingsworth, ECU alumnus and award-winner Ted Hollingsworth '79, ECU alumna Debbie Hollingsworth '81 and  ECU alumnus Robert Hollingsworth '10. Kayla and Robert are Ted and Debbie's children. (Contributed photo)

Pictured at the Pirate Alumni Legacy Brunch are, left to right, current ECU student Kayla Hollingsworth, ECU alumnus and award-winner Ted Hollingsworth ’79, ECU alumna Debbie Hollingsworth ’81 and ECU alumnus Robert Hollingsworth ’10. Kayla and Robert are Ted and Debbie’s children. (Contributed photo)

East Carolina University alumnus Ted Hollingsworth  ’79 was named the East Carolina Alumni Association’s first Legacy Parent of the Year.

The award was presented at the inaugural Pirate Alumni Legacy Brunch at Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium’s club level Sept. 15 during ECU’s Family Weekend.

The Legacy Parent of the Year award honors an alumnus or alumna with a child currently attending ECU who has served as a role model to their student and all students through campus involvement and service to the University and community. Students submitted essays to nominate their parents, and Ted was nominated by his daughter Kayla Hollingsworth. The recipient was a surprise until announced at the event.

“Ted Hollingsworth exemplifies the ‘We Believe’ spirit and displays that through his love, support and commitment to ECU.  He is a worthy recipient of this award as he has passed this legacy and spirit on to his children,” said Alumni Association President and CEO Paul J. Clifford, who presented the award.

Hollingsworth attended the event unaware that he had been nominated, so the award came as a complete surprise. “I was filled with emotion and could not speak,” Hollingsworth said. “I just thought we were going to a social event.

“The fact that I was nominated by my daughter brought tears to my eyes. It is an extreme honor to be chosen as the first Legacy Parent of the Year,” he said.

“I know there are a lot of parents who bleed purple and gold just like I do. Passion for ECU runs deep in our family as in many other families, and that is what makes ECU such a special place.”

Hollingsworth, whose degree is in art, is the president and creative director of Line Design Graphics in Greensboro. He has designed T-shirts for student groups on campus. He helped design how the football field would be painted when ECU became part of Conference USA. He is an active member of the Pirate Club and was fundamental in starting the Ron Pugh Memorial Golf Tournament.

“My dad has always dedicated his life to ECU; he is one of the biggest Pirate fans I know,” Kayla said. “He has always done anything and everything he can for the school or anyone who simply attended ECU. I am extremely proud to be part of an ECU legacy.

“The legacy brunch was a very nice event,” Kayla continued. “It was awesome to have so many legacies in one room. It shows the true dedication Pirates have to ECU.”

The Pirate Alumni Legacy Brunch honored families of current ECU students with two or more generations of Pirates (including parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles, siblings, and/or cousins). The brunch was a sold-out event with more than 140 participants. It will be held again next year during Family Weekend when another Legacy Parent of the Year will be named.

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