ECU sculpture professor exhibits work in Australia

By Jamitress Bowden
ECU News Services

Residents ‘Down Under’ got a glimpse of artwork from eastern North Carolina, thanks to the efforts of an East Carolina University sculptor.

Red Center (Contributed photo)

ECU professor Carl Billingsley’s work, Red Center, on display in Australia. (Contributed photo)

Carl Billingsley, professor of sculpture in East Carolina University’s School of Art and Design, had his work featured in Australia twice this school year.

Originally, Billingsley’s proposal for an art installation titled “Red Center” was originally chosen for “Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi” last fall. His participation in the show last fall lead to an invitation to another outdoor show, in a different city.

He was offered an opportunity through the Andrea Stetton Memorial Invitation to have his piece included at Cottesloe Beach in Australia in March. The installation took Billingsley one day to install at Cottesloe Beach, with help from 12 volunteers.

“I like to have my pieces in public rather than in a museum. I think more people have an opportunity to see the work,” said Billingsley. “It’s kind of a big event where people are very aware of it and look forward to it and they go out for it.”

“Red Center” is an installation of red and yellow construction flags. He chose Australia as inspiration for the installation, and a well-known Australian landmark as inspiration for the name. “At the very center of the continent, is this vast stone, which the aborigines call Uluru and colonists call Ayers Rock or Red Stone,” said Billingsley.

A close-up look at the Red Center artwork.

A close-up look at the Red Center artwork.

Billingsley decided to enter an installation instead of the traditional form of sculpture. “This is a relatively new endeavor for me, as a professor of sculpture. I’ve always focused a lot of my attention on very traditional materials.”

Both shows have had more than 500,000 people in attendance.

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Folger Shakespeare Library exhibit features ECU connections

Irish mantle 1, resized

A replica of an Irish mantle, or cloak, created by East Carolina University School of Art and Design students in Robin Haller’s textile and design course is part of the exhibit at the Folger Shakespeare Library. Photo courtesy of the Folger Shakespeare Library.

By Alexa DeCarr, ECU News Services

An exhibit on display at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C., is showcasing the achievements of Dr. Thomas Herron, an associate professor of English at East Carolina University, students in ECU’s School of Art and Design and the University Multimedia Center.

The exhibit, which opened in January and runs through May 19, is named “Nobility and Newcomers in Renaissance Ireland” and focuses on the Irish upper class during the 16th to mid-17th century and its cultural exchanges with England. It investigates the political struggles of the period while acknowledging the ways in which English and Irish cultures influenced each other through achievements in literature, architecture and the arts.

“It goes beyond the black and white view of the interactions between the English and the Irish,” Herron said of the exhibit.

Students in ECU assistant professor Robin Haller’s textile and design course recreated a replica of an Irish mantle, which Herron said is a type of outer covering or cloak worn by the Irish. The University Multimedia Center also contributed to the exhibit by creating a 3-D computerized recreation of a tower house castle from the Middle Ages that allows viewers to get a virtual tour.

Herron said that a 16th century portrait of Queen Elizabeth I “discovered” in Manteo while hanging in plain sight during a conference organized by the ECU English Department is on display at the exhibit as well.

“ECU has been so generous and has played a major role in the exhibit,” Herron said. “Different departments within the university have gone out of their way to help with the exhibit.”

While the exhibit focuses on Europe during the Renaissance, Herron said modern Americans can still appreciate it.

“Shakespeare is a powerful influence on the U.S. and our culture,” he said. “And many Americans have Irish roots.”

The exhibit, “Nobility and Newcomers in Renaissance Ireland,” features portraits, manuscripts, artifacts, family records, and rare books drawn from collections in Ireland and the United States. The exhibition includes nearly 100 items from the Folger collection, as well as materials from the National Gallery of Ireland, the University of Wisconsin, the National Portrait Gallery, the National Library of Ireland, and private collections.

Brendan Kane, a historian of modern Ireland and an associate professor at the University of Connecticut, was the co-curator of the exhibit.

For more information on the exhibit, visit www.folger.edu/Ireland or contact Tom Herron at herront@ecu.edu.

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Academy-Award winning filmmaker coming to ECU Feb. 28

Filmmaker, activist and grassroots organizer Barbara Trent will present the Global Awareness lecture at the East Carolina University School of Art and Design at 7 p.m. Feb. 28 in Speight Auditorium in the Jenkins Fine Arts Center.BarbaraTrent

Trent’s presentation entitled “Waging Peace in a Global World” will address current events, activism, media hypocrisy and the responsibility and power people have to create change. She will discuss the interconnections between the unraveling ecosystem, the failing economy and war in our society.

Drawing on nearly a half century of experience as a grassroots organizer, Academy-Award winner Trent will use footage from some of her recent films to accompany her comments.

A seasoned activist and filmmaker, Trent won an Oscar in 1993 for the documentary, “The Panama Deception,” and has both directed and produced other films including “Waging Peace,” “Destination Nicaragua,” and “Coverup: Behind the Iran-Contra Affair.” She has publicly exposed criminal activities at the highest level of government and has been the target of at least three FBI counter-intelligence operations.

Appointed as an expert senior training specialist for the VISTA Program under President Jimmy Carter, Trent has been decorated with the Gasper Octavio Hernandez Award by the Journalists’ Union in Panama and is a recipient of the American Humanist Association’s Arts Award for her “courageous advocacy of progressive ideas.”

The Empowerment Project is a media resource center serving progressive videographers and filmmakers. It produces and distributes its own documentary films and videos and provides support for independent producers, artists, activists and organizations to further social, political and artistic purposes.

Several years ago, EP founded Old Oak Homestead, a five-acre homestead that provides training in homesteading skills and renewable energy options as a means to create sustainable communities (self-sustainability and organic growing methods). For more information, visit www.empowermentproject.org.

 

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Posted in Art

Youth Arts Festival seeks artists for April 6 event

The ninth annual Youth Arts Festival seeks artists who would like to share their creative talents with children during an event held on campus at East Carolina University.

The annual Youth Arts Festival, scheduled this year for April 6, promotes multicultural visual and performing arts to children through hands-on projects, demonstrations and performances primarily geared to elementary and middle school children.

No sales commission or booth fees are charged. The event’s focus is on teaching children and their families about the diverse and creative talents available in the region. Participants may work with children developing hands-on art projects or simply demonstrate their creative talent.

The event runs from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. It is free and open to individuals at all age levels.

Contact Dindy Reich, Youth Arts Festival coordinator, at (252) 328-5749 or reichd@ecu.edu for additional information or to sign up for the event.

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Posted in Art

New exhibit opens at Laupus Library

Laupus Library opens its latest art exhibit today with “Artscience in Spacetime: STEAM.” TonyBreuerReceptionFlyer

The exhibit will be on display through March 12.

Dr. Anthony C. Breuer, affiliate professor of neurology in the Brody School of Medicine and a neurologist at East Carolina Neurology, will showcase his collection of acrylic and oil paintings, depicting recognizable see-through images in multiple layers and at times warped to more closely resemble their “actual” appearance in spacetime. His work is conceptual, semi-abstract, and embedded with the nature of reality, energy, and matter, space and time.

The opening reception for the exhibit will be held Jan. 29 from 4:30 p.m. until 6 p.m. in the fourth floor gallery of Laupus Library.

The spring semester exhibit is the third in the Art as Avocation series, which Laupus Library began last year as a way to highlight the artistic talents and self-expression of faculty, staff and students from the Division of Health Sciences who often pursue demanding health care and higher education careers.

Visitors are welcome during normal operating hours posted at http://www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary or call 252-744-2219. Visit http://www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary/events/artasavocation/ to learn more about the artist or series.

 

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