Sex, seduction in Donne’s poetry topic of final Voyages lecture

Williams College professor of English Dr. Illona Bell will present “Sex and Seduction in John Donne’s Poetry” at 7 p.m. March 24 in Bate 1032, East Carolina University.

Bell

Bell

The event is free and no tickets are required.

Bell is the Samuel Fessenden Clark Professor of English at Williams College, with expertise in Renaissance literature, Shakespeare, Elizabeth I, early modern women writers, lyric poetry and Virginia Woolf. She is the author of “Elizabeth I: The Voice of a Monarch,” “Elizabethan Women and the Poetry of Courtship” and numerous essays on Renaissance poetry and early modern women. She also edited “John Donne: Selected Poems.”

Bell received her Ph.D. in literature from Boston College in 1977 and her B.A. in literature from Radcliffe College in 1969. Her presentation concludes the 2014-15 Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series.

For additional information about the Voyages series and its speakers, visit www.ecu.edu/voyages. More information about Harriot College is available at www.ecu.edu/cas.

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Workshops to focus on veterans, military

CWS Brian Turner

 

East Carolina University’s Contemporary Writer Series will host a three-day series of workshops for veterans, military service members and military families March 25 – 27.

All events are free and open to the public. The series will focus on expressing experiences through fiction, non-fiction or visual art. Participants may also wish to contribute to a new publication, The ECU Veterans Anthology.

Veteran poet and essayist Brian Turner will open the series at 7:30 p.m. March 25 in the East Carolina Heart Institute auditorium. Turner will read from his work and discuss his experiences as infantry team leader for the 3 rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team in Iraq from 2003-2004. He is the author of “Here Bullet” (2005), “Phantom Noise” (2010) and “My Life as a Foreign Country” (2014).

A book signing and question and answer session will immediately follow.

A poetry reading at 7 p.m. March 26 in the Greenville Museum of art will feature award-winning poet Ilyse Kusnetz and former North Carolina poet laureate Joseph Bathanti. A book signing and question and answer session will follow readings from both poets’ work.

Kusnetz teaches at Valencia College and lives in Orlando, Fla., with her husband, poet and memoirist Brian Turner. She holds a Ph.D. in feminist and postcolonial British literature from the University of Edinburgh and an M.A. in creative writing from Syracuse University. Bathanti is a professor of creative writing at Appalachian State University and the 2012 state poet laureate. His writings focus on veterans and their families. His honors include the Sam Ragan Fine Arts Award, the Carolina Novel Award and the Linda Flowers Literary Award from the N.C. Humanities Council.

A full listing of events and registration is available at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/veteran-writers-workshop-tickets-15846084064.

For additional information about the workshops, contact Jason Faulkner, teaching instructor in the Department of English, at 252-328-5177 or faulknerj@ecu.edu. For additional information about the events featuring Turner, Kusnetz or Bathanti, contact John Hoppenthaler, associate professor of English, at 252-328-5562; hoppenthalerj@ecu.edu, or Thomas Douglass, associate professor of English, at 252-328-6723; douglasst@ecu.edu.

The workshops are cosponsored by Operation Re-Entry North Carolina, Office of Student Transitions, Pirate Veterans and the Office of the Provost.

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ECU professor to serve as Steffy Lecturer

ECU maritime studies professor Dr. David J. Stewart was asked by the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) to serve as the 2015-16 J. Richard Steffy Lecturer.

David Stewart

David Stewart

The lecture was established in 2008 to commemorate Mr. Steffy’s work in ship reconstruction and the interpretation of wooden ships.

Stewart will deliver a series of presentations to AIA societies on the Kyrenia Ship, Steffy’s most notable reconstruction achievement. The ship, which sank off Cyprus in about 285 B.C., is the best preserved ancient Greek hull available.

In 2011, Stewart led a team that conducted a complete 3D recording of the hull in Kyrenia Castle. He has been using computer modeling to gain a better understanding of the ship’s shape than was possible without the technology.

The ECU program in Maritime Studies is housed in the Department of History in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences.

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Sociology students use global technology to share favorite campus spots

ECU students in a global understanding class enjoyed sharing favorite spots on campus with their counterparts in a foreign country.

ECU students in a global understanding class enjoyed sharing favorite spots on campus with their counterparts in a foreign country.

gup2

ECU sociology instructor and professional photographer Maria McDonald took her students on a tour of key landmarks on campus this Spring, taking photographs to share with students in India, Russia, and China.

McDonald’s Global Understanding: Sociology course is linking with students in these countries, allowing ECU students to share their experiences living in the United States and learn how that experience compares with that of students around the globe.

The course is part of the Global Understanding curriculum, which links ECU students to students in more than 30 countries.

McDonald’s students enjoyed the chance to show their global partners the landmarks they associate with their ECU experience. The photo tour culminated in an opportunity to walk onto the ECU stadium field.

For more information on the Global Understanding curriculum: http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/globalinitiatives/course.cfm

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SUNY professor to discuss secrets of fishes

State University of New York professor Dr. Karin E. Limburg will discuss the secrets of fishes at 4 p.m. March 26 in Room C-209 of East Carolina University’s Science and Technology Building.

Limburg

Limburg

The event is free and open to the public. A light reception will follow.

Her presentation, “The ‘Other’ Biogeochemistry: Otoliths and their use to Reconstruct the Lives of Fishes” will feature an introduction to the otolith, a bone in a fish’s auditory system.

“Fisheries science was revolutionized decades ago by the discovery of fine scale chronometric properties of otoliths (literally, ear-stones),” Limburg said. The small structures, which form part of hearing and balance systems in fishes, provide a permanent record of the age and growth history of each fish, she added.

“Today, a second revolution is occurring in otolith science, as the chemical properties of otoliths are becoming better understood and quantified,” Limburg said.

Limburg is professor in the Department of Environmental and Forest Biology at the State University of New York’s College of Environmental Science and Forestry. She holds a Ph.D. degree from Cornell University, a master’s degree from the University of Florida and dual bachelor’s degrees in biology and ecology/conservation from Vassar College.

She has served as guest scholar at Stockholm University, developing simple ecological/economic models of fisheries. And she held a postdoctoral position at the Institute for Ecosystem Studies (now the Cary Institute), studying interactions of larval fishes and their zooplankton prey. She was a Laura Randall Schweppe visiting lecturer at the University of Texas Marine Lab in 2011.

Limburg has received a National Science Foundation CAREER award for promising scientists early in their career and the 2010 SUNY-ESF Exemplary Researcher of the Year award. She has served as a president of the U.S. Society for Ecological Economics and is president-elect of the Estuarine Section of the American Fisheries Society. She is co-chair of the Continental Margins Working Group, an international scientific collaboration.

The lecture is sponsored by Dr. Roger Rulifson, Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor.

For additional information, contact Rulifson at 252-328-9400 or rulifsonr@ecu.edu.

Individuals requesting accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) should call 252-737-1016 (voice/TTY) at least 48 hours prior to the events.

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Lecture scheduled for March 24

voyages

Dr. Ilona Bell, Samuel Fessenden Clarke Professor of English at Williams College, will present “Sex and Seduction in John Donne’s Poetry,” at 7 p.m. March 24 in 1032 Bate. The Thomas Harriot Lecture is free to all attendees. No tickets are required.

The lecture is cosponsored by Harriot College’s Department of English, as part of the 2014-15 Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series.

For additional information on the Voyages lectures, visit http://www.ecu.edu/voyages. More information about THCAS is located at https://www.ecu.edu/cas.

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ECU professors serve on water quality council

ECU professors Michael O’Driscoll, Marcelo Ardón and David Kimmel, left to right, are members of a council supporting the state’s Nutrient Criteria Development Plan. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

ECU professors Michael O’Driscoll, Marcelo Ardón and David Kimmel, left to right, are members of a council supporting the state’s Nutrient Criteria Development Plan. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Three East Carolina University faculty members are part of the 12-member Science Advisory Council of the state’s Nutrient Criteria Development Plan.

Marcelo Ardón, a biologist; Michael O’Driscoll, a geologist; and David Kimmel, a biologist, are among the seven university scientists on the council. Experts in environmental engineering, nutrient abatement and related fields make up the rest of the council.

Last year, the N.C. Division of Water Resources and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency agreed upon the plan that will develop nutrient criteria for reservoirs and lakes, rivers and streams, and estuaries based primarily on scientifically defensible links between nutrient concentrations and protection of designated uses. The plan establishes a Scientific Advisory Council that will assist the DWR and stakeholders with nutrient criteria development.

The Scientific Advisory Council is composed of experts in the fields of water quality, water quality engineering, nutrient biogeochemistry, nutrient response variables, nutrient management and point and non-point source nutrient abatement.

At ECU, Kimmel studies the impact of human activities on estuarine organisms with particular focus on the effects of chemical nutrient enrichment of ecosystems and climate change on plankton communities.

O’Driscoll’s research focuses on human impacts on water resources with an emphasis on the interactions of groundwater on the physical hydrology, chemistry and ecology of lake, river and wetland systems.

Ardón’s research focuses on how local land use and global climate change are altering the capacity of wetlands and streams to process nutrients. He is also interested in how management practices can restore the lost functions of aquatic ecosystems.

More information about the project and the council members is online at http://portal.ncdenr.org/web/wq/nutrientcriteria.

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ECU professor publishes review of Nobel Prize winner, mentor

 Shouquan Huo

Shouquan Huo

An article written by chemistry professor Shouquan Huo with graduate students Rob Mroz and Jeff Carroll, “Negishi coupling in the synthesis of advanced electronic, optical, electrochemical, and magnetic materials,” is available at http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2015/qo/c4qo00322e#!divAbstract.

The Royal Society of Chemistry invited Huo to submit the review article of work done by his mentor, Nobel Prize winner Ei-ichi Negishi of Purdue University. The work was published in the peer-reviewed journal, Organic Chemistry Frontiers.

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Hoppenthaler publishes third volume of poetry

Hoppenthaler

Hoppenthaler

John Hoppenthaler, an associate professor in the English Department, has just published his third volume of poems, “Domestic Garden,” with Carnegie Mellon University Press, a foremost publisher of poetry in the United States.

Hoppenthaler’s previous publications include “Lives of Water” and “Anticipate the Coming Reservoir.” He co-edited “Jean Valentine: This-World Company,” a collection of essays on the poetry of Jean Valentine. Hoppenthaler also edits “A Poetry Congeries” for the journal Connotation Press: An Online Artifact.

Visit http://www.upne.com/0887485954.html for more details

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