ECU research awarded at conference

ECU graduate student Jessica Handloff, mentored by Dr. Christine Avenarious in the Department of Anthropology, received an award for the best research poster in a conference this month at Texas Tech University. (Contributed photos)

ECU graduate student Jessica Handloff, mentored by Dr. Christine Avenarius in the Department of Anthropology, received an award for the best research poster in a conference this month at Texas Tech University. (Contributed photos)

Research completed by faculty and students in ECU’s Department of Anthropology was named the best research poster presented at the Engagement Scholarship Symposium held Oct. 8-9 at Texas Tech University. ECU anthropology graduate student Jessica Handloff, a member of ECU’s Student Engagement and Outreach Scholars Academy, designed the poster .

The research displayed on the poster was collected under the guidance of ECU anthropology professor Dr. Christine Avenarius, who developed the project proprosal and assisted Handloff in collecting data. Handloff then designed the poster based on the community engagement aspect of the project. She represented ECU, the Department of Anthropology and SEOSA at the conference.

The poster was titled “Community Participation in Risk Management: Exploring Suitable Adaptations to Storm Water Flooding in Nags Head, N.C.” Research focused on community response and communication styles among stakeholders seeking solutions to the flooding problems.

The SEOSA program for ECU graduate students is part of the ECU Engagement and Outreach Scholars Academy, which pairs students with faculty to encourage the scholarship of engagement through workshops and research mentoring programs. For additional information about the academy, visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-admin/chancellor/Engagement-and-Outreach-Scholars-Academy.cfm.

Handloff accepts the best research poster award at the Engagement Scholarship Consortium at Texas Tech University.

Handloff accepts the best research poster award at the Engagement Scholarship Consortium at Texas Tech University.

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Ku Klux Klan expert to speak on organization’s impact in Eastern N.C.

An expert on the history of the Ku Klux Klan will share his insights about the organization’s activities and impact Oct. 16 at East Carolina University.

David Cunningham

David Cunningham

Dr. David Cunningham, associate professor and chair of the Department of Sociology at Brandeis University in Massachusetts, will present “The Contemporary Significance of the Klan and its Role in Communities in Eastern N.C., from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at a brown bag lunch event in Room 1006 in the Bate Building. He will also present “Klansville USA” from 4:30 – 6 p.m. in Sheppard Memorial Library Meeting Room A.

Cunningham is the author of “Klansville USA: The Rise and Fall of the Civil Rights-Era Ku Klux Klan,” the first substantial history of the civil rights-era KKK’s rise and fall. The book focuses on why the United Klans of America flourished in North Carolina and how its rise shines a light on the complex appeal of the Klan as a whole.

Drawing on a range of new archival sources and interviews with Klan members, including state and national leaders, the book uncovers the complex logic of KKK activity. Cunningham demonstrates that the Klan organized most successfully where whites perceived civil rights reforms to be a significant threat to their status, where mainstream outlets for segregationist resistance were lacking and where the policing of the Klan’s activities was lax.

By connecting the Klan to the more mainstream segregationist and anti-communist groups across the South, Cunningham provides insight into Southern conservatism, its resistance to civil rights, and the region’s subsequent shift to supporting the Republican Party.

Cunningham’s work is unique not only in its focus on the Klan in North Carolina during the Civil Rights-era but also because his focus is largely on the Klan as an organization, its day-to-day activities, and its role and impact within communities. He conducted research at ECU, drawing from archival records available through the ECU library and conducting interviews.

His work has received significant national attention from outlets including NPR and The Washington Post. Follow the links below to review a selection of articles about his work.

Cunningham’s appearance is part of the annual Social Issues lecture series sponsored by the ECU Department of Sociology and its Center for Diversity and Inequality Research. Previous speakers have included Dr. Shirley Laska, University of New Orleans, and Dr. David Williams, Harvard University.

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APA honors ECU geography student

East Carolina University geography student Bryn E. Terry was named the American Planning Association – North Carolina Chapter’s Outstanding Student at the 2013 Marvin Collins Planning Awards Ceremony in Winston-Salem Sept. 19.

Terry is a planning major with an outstanding GPA. She participates in sustainable tourism projects along Eastern North Carolina rivers and has conducted research to identify areas underserved by medical facilities and personnel.

The North Carolina Marvin Collins Planning Awards annual recognize agencies and individuals who have completed outstanding projects, excelled as planning students or made notable contributions to the planning profession. The awards signify the highest standards of achievement for planning in North Carolina, and highlight work that is worthy of attention.

The awards program is named in honor of the late Marvin Collins, a former planning director for Orange County. Collins developed the idea for the program in 1975.

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ECU students meet pharmaceutical reps, discuss jobs

ECU students enjoyed an opportunity to meet with pharmaceutical company representatives during an open house on campus. (Photos by Margaret Turner, ECU College of Technology and Computer Science)

ECU students enjoyed the opportunity to meet with pharmaceutical company representatives during an open house on campus. (Photos by Margaret Turner, ECU College of Technology and Computer Science)

A pharmaceutical open house on campus provided assistance to ECU students in networking and securing jobs upon graduation.

The Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences Department of Chemistry and the College of Technology and Computer Science cohosted the pharmaceutical open house Sept. 25 in the Science and Technology Building.

Dr. John C. Sutherland, interim dean of Harriot College, and Dr. David White, dean of the College of Technology and Computer Science, presented introductory remarks at the event, which was attended by more than 87 ECU students and alumni. Both encouraged students to take advantage of the opportunity before them, with the first event of this type being offered.

“There are many great employment opportunities in the pharmaceutical field for our graduates,” White said.  He further encouraged students to “seek out opportunities for internships and co-ops to best prepare for these great jobs.”

Representatives in attendance from pharmaceutical companies across eastern North Carolina included DSM (Greenville); Hospira (Rocky Mount); Metrics (Greenville); PCI: Pharmaceutical Calibrations and Instrumentation, LLC (multiple locations); Purdue Pharma, L.P. (Wilson); Sequence, Inc. (multiple locations); The West Company (Kinston); and Novo Nordisk (Clayton).

Students were able to meet with the various representatives, ask questions, present their resumes and participate in impromptu interviews.

“We want to help students find jobs that will further their careers and also keep them in North Carolina,” said David Harrawood, event organizer. “ECU has a tremendous impact on the economic development of eastern NC. Offering an event such as this displays our commitment to furthering that development across our region.”

Dr. Rickey Hicks, chair of the Department of Chemistry, said, “Overall, the company representatives said they were very happy with the training, experience and professionalism of ECU’s students. They had their resumes, asked good questions and were engaged in the process.”

“The event was a great success. Our students gained valuable experience through the interview process and learned about potential career opportunities in eastern North Carolina.”

An open house on campus helped students meet with potential employers in the pharmaceutical industry.

An open house on campus helped students meet with potential employers in the pharmaceutical industry.

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Griffith named Harriot College of Arts & Sciences distinguished professor

East Carolina University anthropology professor Dr. David Griffith was named distinguished professor for the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences during the college’s annual faculty convocation Aug. 19.

Griffith

Griffith

Griffith was the 15th individual selected for the honor, traditionally awarded at the beginning of each academic year. The award is conferred upon a professor whose career exemplifies a commitment to and a love for knowledge and academic life, as demonstrated by outstanding teaching and advising, research, creative productivity and professional service.

“I have always loved my work at ECU, in large part because of the many fine faculty members …that I have had the good fortune to work with,” Griffith said.

“Early in my career, Keats Sparrow once said to me, ‘You are a good citizen of this university, David.’ At the time, I don’t believe I gave his remark the thought it deserved, but as I have grown older I have come to appreciate what good citizenship means in a university that has become a dynamic, driving force in Eastern North Carolina.”

Griffith is interim director of the ECU Institute for Coastal Science and Policy. He is recognized for his research on labor migration, the decline of traditional fisheries and the effect of that decline on the economic wellbeing of the state’s coastal communities. Griffith has authored or co-authored 35 peer-reviewed journal articles, 25 articles in edited volumes, 21 technical reports, and eight books. He has been a primary investigator or co-investigator on more than 50 research grants totaling $7.1 million.

He is a member of the Southern Coastal Heritage Committee, American Anthropological Association, American Ethnological Society, Society for the Anthropology of Work, Rural Sociological Society, Association for Consumer Research, American Academy of Poets, and the Modern Poetry Association. He is a fellow of the Society for Applied Anthropology and associate editor for the journal, American Anthropologist.

Griffith earned his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Florida and his master’s and bachelor’s degrees in anthropology from the University of Iowa. He joined the ECU faculty in 1984 and was named senior scientist in the ECU Institute for Coastal Science and Policy in 2001.

For additional information, contact Griffith at 252-328-1748 or griffithd@ecu.edu.

 

 

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