ECU medical students advocate for healthcare system change on Capitol Hill

WASHINGTON – Two fourth-year ECU medical students attended the Family Medicine Congressional Conference held April 7- 8 in Washington, D.C.  More than 200 physicians attended the meeting.

Sponsored by the American Academy of Family Physicians and the Council of Academic Family Medicine, the conference educates participants on family medicine’s legislative priority issues, trains attendees on how to educate lawmakers on Capitol Hill and allows participants to put these skills to use with federal legislators and their staff.  Advocacy is a high priority of AAFP and the CAFM organizations.

As part of the meeting, ECU medical students Katy Kirk and Josh Carpenter and others attending from North Carolina had opportunities to meet with 12 of the state’s 15 congressional delegation members, including Senator Richard Burr, to urge passage of legislation that will maintain access to care for elderly and disabled Americans.  Such legislation would also address the primary care physician shortage by supporting primary care medical education as well as medical school scholarship and loan repayment programs.

Both Kirk and Carpenter will be entering family medicine residency training later this year.  Kirk will be joining the Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center Family Medicine Residency program in Phoenix, AZ, and Carpenter will begin his residency with the Cabarrus Family Medicine Residency in Concord, NC.

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Departing Brody students offer annual ‘Day of Service’

Medical students participate in Brody Day of Service. (Contributed photos)

Medical students participate in Brody Day of Service. (Contributed photos)

Before learning where they’d be placed for medical residency, 80 students from ECU’s Brody School of Medicine spent a Day of Service giving back to the place they’ve called home for the last four years.

“Brody is built on a commitment of service to eastern North Carolina in gratitude for the opportunity to learn the art of medicine from its citizens,” said medical student Lindsey Fix, class president for 2014. “So much of our training emphasizes how our role as physicians will be to care for and improve the health of the community in which we live and work.

“Going to school in a rural part of the country gives us countless opportunities to help people in need. The act of service is simply integral to the Brody experience and the culture of our medical school.” 3

The fourth-year medical students participated in varied projects Friday, March 14. Some related directly to their involvement in medicine, such as service to the student-run Grimesland Clinic or performing maintenance at the Ronald McDonald House, which offers a place to stay for families of children receiving care at Vidant Medical Center.

Students prepared for the upcoming St. Baldrick’s Day event – the third one sponsored by the class of 2014 – which raises money and awareness for pediatric cancer research by shaving volunteers’ heads. The Greenville Community Shelter clinic was also renovated, cleaned and stocked during the service day.

Others projects were simply about meeting a need. Students hosted a pancake breakfast for the families and patients at the Hope Lodge who are receiving cancer therapy at Vidant and live too far away to commute. Others worked with students at the Little Willie Center and helped clean and update the facilities.

Habitat for Humanity and the Center for Domestic Violence also both received help from Brody students during the Day of Service.

The class of 2014 gift to the Brody School of Medicine was to update and renovate the student lending library for pre-clinical and clinical students. This involved collecting book donations, organizing resources and relocating the library to within the med school.

Each project was chosen by the students based on experiences and long-term commitments to service made previously with these organizations, Fix said. Many students have been working with these groups for their entire four years of medical school – some even as undergraduates at ECU.

“For most of us, it was a way to thank these groups for being a part of our lives over the past few years,” Fix said. “The class of 2014 is proud of Brody and proud of our community. Before we officially become doctors and scatter to residencies across the nation, we wanted this opportunity to try and repay some of the generosity that has allowed us to reach this amazing point in our lives.”

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Annual Hamstring Hustle 5K to be April 5

For the 20th year, runners and walkers may lace up their sneakers and pound the pavement in the Hamstring Hustle 5K Run/Walk.

The race starts at 9 a.m. at ECU Health Sciences Building on the East Carolina University health sciences campus. The race will wind through the grounds of the ECU Health Sciences Campus and Vidant Medical Center and is a USA Track and Field-certified course/sanctioned event.

The race is presented by the Medical Student Council at the Brody School of Medicine. A portion of the proceeds from the race will benefit the ECU Pediatric Healthy Weight Research and Treatment Center, a non-profit organization dedicated to helping children achieve a healthy lifestyle.

Registration is $20 by March 28, includes a T-shirt and is available online at http://www.hamstringhustle.com. Race day registration is $25; arrive by 8:15 a.m. April 5.

Participants should be at the race site by 8:15 a.m. the day of the race.

Awards will be presented to the overall male and female winners and to the top three males and females in the following age groups: 12 and under, 13-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59 and 60 and over.

E-mail race organizers at linerk12@students.ecu.edu or call 252-289-7590 for more information.

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Longtime employee celebrates 80th birthday

Jackson

Jackson

Longtime ECU employee Hagar Jackson celebrated her 80th birthday March 18.

She has worked at ECU for 27 years, beginning in 1986 at age 50. She retired when she turned 65, then returned to work. Since 1990, she has worked in patient access services in the division of cardiology, which is now part of the East Carolina Heart Institute at ECU.

“When you find your nest, stay in it,” she said. She added that she plans to keep working “until I get old enough to retire.”

Co-workers threw her a small party Tuesday at the heart institute.

Doug Boyd

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ECU Medical & Health Sciences Foundation names new board members

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The East Carolina University Medical & Health Sciences Foundation recently named five new board members. They are David Brody of Kinston; Dasha Little of Chesapeake, Va.; Dennis Young of Wallace; Kathy Walker and Lamont Wooten, both of Greenville.

A former chair of the ECU Board of Trustees, Brody is the managing partner with Brody Associates. He also serves the university as a member of the Brody Foundation Board of Directors.

A 1981 graduate of ECU, Little is president/owner of Apogee Solutions. She is a member of the Women’s Roundtable at ECU and was recognized in 2013 as one of 10 “Incredible ECU Women.”

Walker established the Walker Distinguished Professorship in Clinical Oncology as well as the Leo Jenkins Canter Center Coach Roggeman Cancer Research Fund. She is married to Dr. Paul Walker, director of Thoracic Oncology at Leo Jenkins Cancer Center and is an active community volunteer.

An orthopedic surgeon, Wooten is an emeritus member of Orthopedics East and Sports Medicine Center Inc. He serves on the advisory board for the Harriet and John Wooten Laboratory for Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Research at the Brody School of Medicine.

Young retired from ECU in 2012. In 2006, he became the associate athletic director focusing on major gifts and served as executive director of the Pirate Club from 1991-2006.

The East Carolina University Medical & Health Sciences Foundation serves the College of Allied Health Sciences, Brody School of Medicine, College of Nursing, Laupus Library, Leo Jenkins Cancer Center, East Carolina Heart Institute, School of Dental Medicine, East Carolina Diabetes & Obesity Institute and the North Carolina Agromedicine Institute with financial support, scholarships, education and research.

 

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