HHP blood challenge exceeds expectations

A challenge between East Carolina University students in two College of Health and Human Performance courses led to the collection of 333 units of blood Feb. 18 and 19 at Mendenhall Student Center.

The HLTH 1000 and EXSS1000 Blood Challenge, which encouraged students in those classes to complete through blood donations, exceeded its goal of 300 units. This year’s winning department was the Department of Kinesiology, which reached 11.7 percent with 198 donors from a possible 1,686 students enrolled in EXSS1000. The Department of Health Education and Promotion came in a close second with 11.5 percent, drawing 273 donors from a possible 2,375 HLTH 1000 students.

The event was coordinated by Debra Tavasso and Brian Cavanaugh in Health Education and Promotion, along with Grace Anne Vick in the Department of Kinesiology. Graduate teaching assistants who teach the two courses served as volunteers for the challenge.

Each unit of blood collected has the potential to save three lives.

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ECU professor publishes in Journal of Sport Management

stacy headshot2

Dr. Stacy Warner

An article by East Carolina University professor Dr. Stacy Warner in the Department of Kinesiology was published in the September 2013 issue of Journal of Sport Management.

Titled “Examining sense of community in sport: Developing the multidimensional ‘SCS’ scale,” the article discussed the need for an instrument that measures social benefits of sports.  The research was completed with co-authors Dr. Shannon Kerwin of Brock University and Dr. Matthew Walker of Texas A &M University.

The results of this work yielded a valid and reliable 21-item instrument to measure the sense of community experienced in sport setting. According to the researchers, sport organizations often claim that being able to quantify this social benefit is fundamental to justifying the benefits of appropriately managed sport programs or pinpointing weaknesses in its management. Specifically, the instrument assesses Administrative Consideration, Common Interest, Equity in Administrative Decisions, Leadership Opportunity, Social Spaces, and Competition.

Warner’s research interests are in the roles that sport and sport culture play in the lives of individuals through families, communities, work environments and social networks.  This research specifically focuses on organizational structures that optimize community building and development in a way that improves the life quality for athletes.

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Rimpf gets keys to new home

Dr. Glen Gilbert, interim vice chancellor for university advancement, presents ECU graduate and wounded warrior Nathan Rimpf with a Pirates helmet. (Photo by Emily Packard)

Dr. Glen Gilbert, interim vice chancellor for university advancement, presents ECU graduate and wounded warrior Nathan Rimpf with a Pirates helmet. (Photo by Emily Packard)

 

Wounded warrior Nathan Rimpf has moved into his new home in the Renaissance Park neighborhood in south Raleigh.

The traditional-style home, with a double porch and blue shutters, is the sixth home constructed by a partnership between the Home Builders Association of Raleigh-Wake County and the Triangle Veterans Association.

Four paratroopers who parachuted in as fireworks exploded delivered the keys to Rimpf’s new home.

Speaking to a large crowd of family and ECU friends at the key ceremony on Nov. 7, Rimpf said he does not regret his sacrifice. “This isn’t exactly what I dreamed – it’s way beyond that,” he said. “Look at this out here. Who wouldn’t give a pair of ugly feet to defend these people? It’s been a very awesome 487 days, to be honest.”

After graduating from ECU’s ROTC program, Rimpf became an Army Ranger. He stepped on an improvised explosive device while on patrol in Anbar Province and lost his lower legs.

Cadets from ECU’s ROTC program, including seniors who were freshmen when Rimpf was a senior, attended the ceremony. Glenn Gilbert, acting vice chancellor of university advancement, also spoke.

Rimpf walks easily on prosthetic legs but he said standing for long periods tires him. The stairs of his new home have a wheelchair lift.

Steve Tuttle

 

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ECU professor honored by Texas A&M University

ECU professor Dr. Melanie Sartore-Baldwin accepts an outstanding alumni award at Texas A&M University. (Contributed photo)

ECU professor Dr. Melanie Sartore-Baldwin accepts an outstanding alumni award at Texas A&M University. (Contributed photo)

East Carolina University professor Dr. Melanie Sartore-Baldwin was named the 2013 Outstanding Alumni (Early Career) by Texas A&M University Oct. 25 at the Annenberg Presidential Conference Center.

This award is the highest honor that can be bestowed upon alumni who earned his or her degree within the past five years and recognizes significant contributions to their fields in the areas of teaching, research, or service.

“Dr. Sartore-Baldwin joined ECU immediately after her work at Texas A&M,” said Dr. Stacey Altman, chair of the ECU Department of Kinesiology, housed in the College of Health and Human Performance.  “Since then she has represented her alma mater and the fine program she was part of at that institution.”

A 2007 graduate of the College of Education and Human Development at Texas A&M, Sartore-Baldwin was among five alumni recognized.  One award is presented to an early career graduate.

“From her day-to-day meaningful interactions with students in the classroom and office to her research that has resulted in her selection as a NASSM fellow, her achievements are many,” continued Altman.

“Perhaps most impressive is an unwavering commitment to integrity and authenticity while pursuing social justice through her professional and personal life.  She is indeed deserving of this award.”

Sartore-Baldwin began teaching at ECU in 2007.  She earned a bachelor’s degree in physical education/exercise science from Western Illinois University in 2000.  She received a dual master’s degree from Indiana University in 2003.

 

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HHP Welcomes New ROTC Commanders

LTC Thomas E. Glockzin is commander of the ECU Air Force ROTC.

Lt. Col. Glockzin

Lt. Col. Glockzin

He recently served as the deputy commander, 43rd Airlift Group, Pope Field, North Carolina where he commanded eight squadrons, 13 group staff agencies, and 1,200 personnel supporting five Major commands.  At Pope Field, Glockzin also served as chief of staff and directed activities for 85 personnel.  He is a master navigator with more than 4,000 flying hours, including more than 200 combat and combat support hours.  He earned an undergraduate degree in 1989 in industrial and operations engineering from the University of Michigan and a graduate degree in 1998 in Aeronautical/Aviation Science from Embry Riddle Aeronautical University. He is the recipient of the Meritorious Service Medal (Fourth Oak Leaf Cluster).

LTC Sean Farrar

LTC Sean Farrar

LTC Sean E. Farrar is commander of the ECU Army ROTC.  He recently served as a division chief in the Aviation Test Directorate at the U.S. Army Operation Test Command in Fort Hood, Texas, where he conducted testing of new Aviation aircraft and equipment.  At Fort Hood he tested the new Apache attack helicopter and an aircrew protective mask used for chemically or biologically contaminated environments.  He is a UH-60 Blackhawk pilot with one combat tour in Iraq, where he served as an advisor and trainer to the Iraqi Police.  He earned an undergraduate degree in 1994 in geography from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and a graduate degree in 2003 in Individual Counseling from Long Island University.

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