New trees planned for sustainable parking lot renovation

Trees that were to be included as part of a sustainable parking lot design were determined to be dead when they did not produce leaves this spring. Designers plan to replace the lost trees. (Contributed photos)

New trees will be planted in the 14th Street parking lot renovation area across from Belk Residence Hall as part of a sustainable parking lot design.

The new canopy trees will replace several existing trees that died this winter.

The parking lot renovation is the first construction project initiated since East Carolina University adopted its new master plan designating sustainability as a core value for the institution.

The existing trees were a key element incorporated into the original sustainable parking lot design. However, experts identified the trees as dead when they failed to produce new leaves this spring. Since the old trees cannot be saved, new trees will be planted to replace them.

The existing green areas will not be used for additional parking.

The campus personnel involved in the design of this parking lot also chose to maintain and protect the trees at the former Stratford Arms Apartment site.

For additional information, visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-admin/parkingandtransportation/bnjuly2012.cfm.

 

A plan to maintain existing trees in a new parking lot renovation fell through when the trees died over the winter. New trees will be planted in their place.

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New Concentration

ECU Kicks off New Risk Management and Insurance Program

The College of Business at East Carolina University kicked off its new risk management and insurance program this month. Directed by Brenda Wells, an insurance expert who holds a Ph.D. in risk management and insurance from the University of Georgia, ECU’s risk management and insurance concentration is a direct result of partnerships with industry professionals. More than 40 students have already enrolled.

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Summer medical education program deadline nears

College students and recent graduates aiming for a career as a physician have until March 4 to apply to ECU’s Summer Program for Future Doctors.

The eight-week summer program at the Brody School of Medicine, which begins May 16, is an intensive program that lets participants experience the demands of a medical school curriculum.

The only requirement is that students be North Carolina residents. Preference is given to minorities, disadvantaged and non-traditional students, but all students are encouraged to apply.

Students should have satisfactorily completed one year of biology, chemistry and physics. Organic chemistry is strongly encouraged. The program is tuition-free, though participants are responsible for living expenses. Eligible students will receive stipends.

Applications and more information are online at http://www.ecu.edu/ascc/SPFD.cfm.

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Space Grant

NC Space Grant Expands Consortium Membership

ECU is the newest university to join the NC Space Grant, a consortium of academic institutions that promote, develop, and support aeronautics and space-related science, engineering, and technology education and training in the state.

In partnership with NASA, industry, non-profit organizations, and state government agencies, the NC Space Grant conducts programs designed to equip the current and future aero/space workforce in North Carolina.

Other N.C. affiliates include Appalachian State, Duke and N.C. State universities and the North Carolina Community College System.

As a new member of the NC Space Grant, ECU will collaborate with NASA and the aero/space community and strengthen existing relationships.

Led by Dr. John Rummel, the Space Grant program at ECU will use space science and technology as a vehicle to “inspire the next generation of explorers” using ongoing NASA-related research and educational programs at ECU with NC Space Grant-focused activities. The ECU mission is to increase the interest, awareness, and opportunities brought by ECU faculty to develop astrobiology, space science, planetary sciences, and exploration opportunities for university students, first, and thereby reach K-12 teachers, students, and the public.

Rummel is the director of the Institute for Coastal Science and Policy and a professor of biology at ECU.  Prior to his arrival at ECU in 2008, Rummel was the NASA Senior Scientist for Astrobiology, based in Washington, D.C., responsible for leading all aspects of NASA’s program to understand the origin, evolution, and fate of life in the universe.

For more information about the NC Space Grant, visit www.ncspacegrant.org.

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FaculTea will Feature Wilson-Okamura

David Wilson-Okamura (English) will present, “How Research worked in the Renaissance” during the FaculTea for Faculty, 3:30 to 5 p.m., Feb. 10 at Joyner Library Conference Room 2408. ECU faculty members are encouraged to join in for tea, cookies and scholarly exchange, while interacting with faculty in other disciplines.

The event is a collaborative effort between Joyner Library and Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences.

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