In Memoriam: William C. Friday

William C. Friday, president emeritus of the University of North Carolina, died Oct. 12 on the 219 birthday of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He was 92.

William C. Friday

Following a series of leadership roles for the university, Friday assumed the position of UNC system president in 1956. He served in that role 30 years.

“Bill Friday lived a life that exemplified everything that has made our University – and the state of North Carolina – great,” said UNC President Tom Ross.

“He was a man of unquestioned honor and integrity who devoted a lifetime of extraordinary leadership and service to the University and state he loved so much. He also was a man of deep courage and conviction who never backed away from doing the right thing for our students, our faculty or our citizens. We have truly lost one of North Carolina’s most special treasures.”

Speaking at East Carolina University later in the day after Friday’s death had been announced, Ross paid tribute to the retired UNC system president during his remarks at the ribbon cutting for Ledyard E. Ross Hall, home of the School of Dental Medicine. “He set the gold standard for leadership in higher education,” Ross said.

ECU Chancellor Steve Ballard said, “Bill Friday devoted his life to providing extraordinary leadership and service to public higher education in the state of North Carolina. He embraced the enduring values of respect, authenticity, and a commitment to serve that have helped our University to deliver on the promise of opportunity.  Our state has lost a great leader and we will sincerely miss him. We would all do well to try to be more like Bill Friday.”

A native of Virginia, Friday grew up in Dallas, N.C. He earned a textile engineering degree from NCSU and graduated from the UNC-CH law school in 1948.

 

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In Memoriam: Richard Page Hudson Jr.

Richard Page Hudson Jr. of Asheville, former professor and pathologist at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, died Sept. 30.

Hudson was the first chief medical examiner of North Carolina and helped develop North Carolina’s statewide medical examiner system to provide medical input in cases were death was suspicious, unnatural or unattended.

He held a doctor of medicine degree from the Medical College of Virginia and a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Richmond. He interned at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Md., before traveling to Japan to director the histopathology lab at the USAF Hospital Tachikawa.

He returned to the United States to complete a research fellowship with Harvard Medical School, then completed his pathology residency at the King’s County Hospital in Brooklyn, N.Y.

He served on the faculty of the State University of New York, the Medical College of Virginia and UNC – Chapel Hill, where he partnered with the School of Medicine to develop a statewide medical examiners system and a forensic pathology residency training program.

He co-founded the state’s Sudden Infant Death Program and the N.C. Child Medical Evaluation program for investigation of child abuse and neglect.

He practed at the ECU medical school for five years before retiring as professor emeritus.

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In Memoriam: Coach Norman Earl Smith

East Carolina University Pirate Hall of Famer Norman Earl Smith died Aug. 5 in Fayetteville.

Smith was inducted into the Pirate Hall of Fame in 1977, in honor of his stellar coaching career in ECU basketball (1959-63) and baseball (1963-72).

Coach Norman Earl Smith
(Photo from ECUPirates.com)

With Smith at the helm, the Pirates baseball team finished first place in four consecutive years in the Southern Conference, from 1966 to 1970. The team’s overall record under Smith’s leadership was 185-103-2. Smith led the Pirate basketball team to a 53-40 record.

Smith graduated from ECU in 1939. From his sophomore year through his senior year, he was a member of the Pirates baseball, basketball and football teams.

Smith was also inducted into the Campbell University Athletics Hall of Fame in 1986 and the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame in 2003.

After retiring as a coach he became a professional baseball scout for the San Diego Padres.

For information on the Wednesday funeral service, visit http://www.directorsadvantage.net/sites/jernigan/new_view.php?id=99395.

 

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In Memoriam: William Howard Waugh

ECU Professor Emeritus Dr. William Howard Waugh, former director of the Department of Clinical Sciences and former acting chair of the Department of Medicine, died July 18. Waugh was instrumental in founding the School of Medicine at ECU.

He served the university for 30 years and chaired the institutional review board for research with human subjects for 18 years. He retired in 2001, remaining active as professor emeritus in physiology. Following retirement, Waugh continued scientific research and publication, working from a laboratory at home. His last publication appeared in 2010 when he was 85.

Waugh was a graduate of Tufts University School of Medicine in Medford, Mass., and attended Boston University and West Virginia University. He served with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in WWII and with the U.S. Air Force Medical Corps in the Korean Conflict. In addition to ECU, he held faculty positions at the Medical College of Georgia and the University of Kentucky School of Medicine.

He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Eileen Garrigan Waugh, of Greenville; children, Mark H. Waugh, of Knoxville, Tenn., Kathleen C. Waugh, of Scottsdale, Ariz., and William P. Waugh, of Goldsboro; and a grandson, Robert M. Waugh, of New York City.

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In Memoriam: Champion ECU diving coach Mark Lenzi

Mark Lenzi (Photo courtesy of East Carolina University Sports Information)

Olympic gold medalist and former East Carolina University diving coach Mark Lenzi died April 9 in Greenville. He was 43.

Lenzi’s alma mater, Indiana University, made the announcement Monday.

Lenzi represented the U.S. at the 1992 Olympics in Barcelona, where he won the gold medal on the 3-meter springboard.

After a brief retirement, Lenzi returned to the sport in 1995 and qualified for the 1996 Atlanta Olympics on the 3-meter springboard, where he earned a bronze medal.

Lenzi won 18 international competitions in all on the 1- and 3-meter boards. He was the first American to win a gold medal at the Pan American Games on the 1-meter springboard and was the first diver to score over 700 points (762.35) on the three-meter springboard for 11 dives.

Lenzi won NCAA titles in 1989 and 1990, winning the 1-meter springboard both years. Lenzi was a four-time Big Ten Champion, winning all three disciplines in 1989 (1-meter, 3-meter, platform), and taking the 1-meter title in 1990. He was named NCAA Diver of the Year in 1989 and 1990.

Lenzi spent the 2009-10 and 2010-11 seasons as men and women’s diving coach at East Carolina University. Prior to that Lenzi coached the junior diving team at IU, with divers winning four national age-group titles.

Survivors include his wife, the former Dorothy Koncsol of Greenville; his mother, Ellie Lenzi of Fredericksburg; two brothers; a sister; and a grandmother.

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