ECU ranked among best colleges in new listing

East Carolina University is listed in a new ranking of Best Colleges released this week by Money magazine.

ECU is ranked 339 out of 665 institutions. Educational quality, affordability and alumni earnings provided by PayScale.com were used to determine the rankings, according to the magazine’s methodology.

The magazine evaluated about 1,500 four-year colleges across the nation to find which offered the most for the amount of tuition paid. Colleges with below-average graduation rates were dropped, which left 665 institutions that were measured and ranked.

Information is available at  http://time.com/money/collection/moneys-best-colleges/.

 

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Folger Shakespeare Library exhibit features ECU connections

Irish mantle 1, resized

A replica of an Irish mantle, or cloak, created by East Carolina University School of Art and Design students in Robin Haller’s textile and design course is part of the exhibit at the Folger Shakespeare Library. Photo courtesy of the Folger Shakespeare Library.

By Alexa DeCarr, ECU News Services

An exhibit on display at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C., is showcasing the achievements of Dr. Thomas Herron, an associate professor of English at East Carolina University, students in ECU’s School of Art and Design and the University Multimedia Center.

The exhibit, which opened in January and runs through May 19, is named “Nobility and Newcomers in Renaissance Ireland” and focuses on the Irish upper class during the 16th to mid-17th century and its cultural exchanges with England. It investigates the political struggles of the period while acknowledging the ways in which English and Irish cultures influenced each other through achievements in literature, architecture and the arts.

“It goes beyond the black and white view of the interactions between the English and the Irish,” Herron said of the exhibit.

Students in ECU assistant professor Robin Haller’s textile and design course recreated a replica of an Irish mantle, which Herron said is a type of outer covering or cloak worn by the Irish. The University Multimedia Center also contributed to the exhibit by creating a 3-D computerized recreation of a tower house castle from the Middle Ages that allows viewers to get a virtual tour.

Herron said that a 16th century portrait of Queen Elizabeth I “discovered” in Manteo while hanging in plain sight during a conference organized by the ECU English Department is on display at the exhibit as well.

“ECU has been so generous and has played a major role in the exhibit,” Herron said. “Different departments within the university have gone out of their way to help with the exhibit.”

While the exhibit focuses on Europe during the Renaissance, Herron said modern Americans can still appreciate it.

“Shakespeare is a powerful influence on the U.S. and our culture,” he said. “And many Americans have Irish roots.”

The exhibit, “Nobility and Newcomers in Renaissance Ireland,” features portraits, manuscripts, artifacts, family records, and rare books drawn from collections in Ireland and the United States. The exhibition includes nearly 100 items from the Folger collection, as well as materials from the National Gallery of Ireland, the University of Wisconsin, the National Portrait Gallery, the National Library of Ireland, and private collections.

Brendan Kane, a historian of modern Ireland and an associate professor at the University of Connecticut, was the co-curator of the exhibit.

For more information on the exhibit, visit www.folger.edu/Ireland or contact Tom Herron at herront@ecu.edu.

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Reward announced for Dowdy-Ficklen vandalism information

ECU Police announced today that Pitt-Greenville Crimestoppers is offering up to $5,000 in reward funds for information leading to an arrest of two suspects who broke into and damaged Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium on Oct. 21.

Lt. Chris Sutton announced the Crimestoppers reward at a media briefing releasing photos taken from stadium surveillance video during the vandalism that occurred between 3 a.m. and 6:20 a.m. Oct. 21.

Approximately $35,000 in damage was done by three suspects.

Persons with information about the identity of the two individuals shown with former ECU student William J. Banks on the video should call Crimestoppers at 758-7777. Individuals are not asked for their names when reporting  information; they are identified through a code system. If the information leads to an arrest, the person could receive up to $5,000 in reward money.

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New trees planned for sustainable parking lot renovation

Trees that were to be included as part of a sustainable parking lot design were determined to be dead when they did not produce leaves this spring. Designers plan to replace the lost trees. (Contributed photos)

New trees will be planted in the 14th Street parking lot renovation area across from Belk Residence Hall as part of a sustainable parking lot design.

The new canopy trees will replace several existing trees that died this winter.

The parking lot renovation is the first construction project initiated since East Carolina University adopted its new master plan designating sustainability as a core value for the institution.

The existing trees were a key element incorporated into the original sustainable parking lot design. However, experts identified the trees as dead when they failed to produce new leaves this spring. Since the old trees cannot be saved, new trees will be planted to replace them.

The existing green areas will not be used for additional parking.

The campus personnel involved in the design of this parking lot also chose to maintain and protect the trees at the former Stratford Arms Apartment site.

For additional information, visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-admin/parkingandtransportation/bnjuly2012.cfm.

 

A plan to maintain existing trees in a new parking lot renovation fell through when the trees died over the winter. New trees will be planted in their place.

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