Joyner Library recognizes writing award winners

Pictured left to right at the awards presentation are Interim Dean Jan Lewis, Kimberly Miller (third place), Sarah Stout (second place), Liz Sparrow, Ashley Campbell (first place) and Charles Ward, President of Friends of Joyner Library.

Pictured left to right at the awards presentation are Interim Dean Jan Lewis, Kimberly Miller (third place), Sarah Stout (second place), Liz Sparrow, Ashley Campbell (first place) and Charles Ward, President of Friends of Joyner Library.

The winners of the 2014 W. Keats Sparrow Writing Awards were recognized in a ceremony at Joyner Library Aug.  27. The awards recognize excellence in research and writing by students in ECU’s English 1100 and 1200 composition classes.

Ashley Campbell, first place, won $200 for “The Effects of Text Messaging on Students’ Literacy.”  The second place entry, “Emergence of Antibiotic Resistance:  MRSA,” was written by Sarah Stout, who won $150.  Kimberly Miller placed third with a $100 prize for “Land of the Free – Why not ‘Sea of the Free?’”  Marc Peterson was the instructor for all three winners, a first in the award program’s history.

“Joyner Library and the Department of English have a well-established information literacy program that helps students develop research and critical thinking skills,” said Jan Lewis, interim dean of Joyner Library.  “Since its inception in 2000, the W. Keats Sparrow Award program has recognized students who have excelled in these areas. It is always a delight to meet these students, listen to excerpts from their papers, and talk with them about their education, career plans, and the importance of the Library to their success.”

The Friends of Joyner Library sponsored the event named in honor of the late Dr. W. Keats Sparrow, Professor Emeritus of English and former dean of the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences.  Mrs. Elizabeth (Liz) Sparrow, who serves on the Friends of Joyner Library Board of Directors, was on hand for the event.

For more information about this writing award program, contact David Hisle, coordinator of instructional services at 328-4978.

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ECU’s Joyner Library grant award leads to $119,500 archival project

The National Archives’ National Historical Publications and Records Commission has awarded a grant to the Special Collections Division at Joyner Library to process the archives of the Institute of Outdoor Theatre.

Photos and materials from "Unto These Hills" and "The Lost Colony"  — both North Carolina outdoor productions — will be included in the Institute of Outdoor Theatre's archival project. Pictured above is the Eagle Dance from "Unto These Hills." (Photo by Chris McCoy)

Photos and materials from “Unto These Hills” and “The Lost Colony” — both North Carolina outdoor productions — will be included in the Institute of Outdoor Theatre’s archival project. Pictured above is the Eagle Dance from “Unto These Hills.” (Photo by Chris McCoy) 

With matching funds from East Carolina University, Joyner Library and the IOT, the total project budget exceeds $119,500, according to Dr. Michael C. Hardy, director of the IOT, which is located at the university.

The one-year, $56,290 grant is part of the Commission’s Documenting Democracy: Access to Historical Records program which funds projects that promote the preservation and use of the nation’s most valuable archival resources. The grant will also allow for the creation of a comprehensive online archive allowing worldwide access to the IOT archive.

“I am pleased that Joyner Library can partner with ECU’s College of Fine Arts and Communication and the Institute of Outdoor Theatre to provide access to the archives to researchers worldwide,” said Janice S. Lewis, interim dean of Joyner Library. “The photographs, video and audio recordings, publicity materials, feasibility studies, original research, and other materials will provide unparalleled insights into the challenges and successes experienced by outdoor theatres and the communities in which they operate. I look forward to sharing its riches with a broader audience.”

Since its founding in 1963, the IOT has amassed a considerable collection related to more than 600 outdoor theatres. The earliest of those theatres began in the 1920s. The institute was founded with the purpose of supporting these theatres with technical assistance, documentation of best practices in the field, and management and feasibility studies.

“The archival materials accumulated by the Institute of Outdoor Theatre over the past 50 years provide a unique view of a distinct movement in American Theatre history,” said Hardy. “We are very pleased to have received this important recognition of the quality of our archives from the National Archive’s panel of experts, and we look forward to making them available to future researchers when this project is complete.”

The audience for these materials includes set builders, regional and social historians, folklorists, those concentrating on performing arts history, tourism history and those interested in the general origin of historical outdoor drama in the United States, as well as Shakespeare and Renaissance festivals and outdoor theatre.

Assistant Director for Special Collections Kacy Guill said, “Once processed, we believe the IOT collection will have appeal to ECU students as well as national and international researchers.”

For more information, contact Dale Sauter, principal investigator and interim head of service, at 252.328.0275 or sauterd@ecu.edu.

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Joyner Library offers pet therapy to relieve exam stress

Time spent with a dog or cat can help students unwind from the stresses of exam time. Joyner Library is offering three pet therapy sessions during the spring 2014 exam period. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Time spent with a dog or cat can help students unwind from the stresses of exam time. Joyner Library is offering three pet therapy sessions during the spring 2014 exam period. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

May 1 marks the start of spring semester exams at ECU, prompting for many students a stress-filled week of late-night studying. To help alleviate that stress, Joyner Library is offering some furry help from pet therapy dogs May 1, 5 and May 6.

In the Pet Therapy sessions, ECU outreach librarians team with Pet Partners to provide trained animals and handlers who visit campus to interact with students. The goal of the interaction with cats and dogs – and with the human owners —  is to help students unwind in a friendly social setting. Snacks are provided. Participants may register for prizes, send home a free postcard or post a photo to the library’s Instagram account.

Scheduled events are noon to 1 p.m. May 1, with Callie and Breeze the black lab; 1 p.m. – 2 p.m. May 5 with JJ the boxer; and 5 p.m. – 6 p.m. May 6 with Aggie the cat, Waldo the lab/corgi and Yazzie the Doberman.

For more information contact Carolyn Willis, outreach coordinator at willisc@ecu.edu, or 252-328-0400 or Kathryn K. Webb, interim head of service at kavanaghk@ecu.edu or 252-328-0734.

– Dawn Wainwright

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Annual Edible Book Festival held at ECU’s Joyner Library

At ECU's annual Edible Book Festival, the "Swiss (Cheese) Family Robinson" submission by Wesley Dills won Best in Show in the adult category. (Submitted photos)

At ECU’s annual Edible Book Festival, the “Swiss (Cheese) Family Robinson” submission by Wesley Dills won Best in Show in the adult category. (Submitted photos)

Joyner Library at East Carolina University hosted the third annual Edible Book Festival March 29.

Eleanor Cook, assistant dirctor for Discovery and Technology Services at the library, said the festival is held each year around the world. The event “celebrates books and culinary craftsmanship that draws upon the creativity of community members,” she said.

Participants decorate edible items that represent some aspect of a book and submitted items are included in a competition. Juried categories include most edible, least edible, wittiest and best in show for youth and adult.

This year’s judges at ECU were Greenville Banks, Jr and Cecilia Moore-Cobb from the Friends of Joyner Library Board of Directors.

In addition, a silent auction featured professional cakes donated by Aramark/ECU and Lowe’s foods. Proceeds form the auction and additional donations go toward the Joyner Library Preservation and Conservation fund, said Lisa Barricella, department head of Monographic Acquisitions & Preservation/Conservation.

“This fund helps to support the purchase of equipment and materials used in Joyner’s conservation labs where technicians conserve books, documents, manuscripts and photographs for long-term access,” Barricella said.

The 2014 Edible Book Festival winners were as follows:

Makayla Gilland poses with her "Horton Hears a Who!” entry, which won for most edible.

Makayla Gilland poses with her “Horton Hears a Who!” entry, which won for most edible.

Most Edible:  “Horton Hears a Who!” by Dr. Seuss, submitted by Makayla Gilland (Youth entry)

Least Edible:  “Fish! Tales” by Stephen Lundin et al., submited by Gloria Bradshaw

Wittiest:  “Cold Mountain” (Dew) by Charles Frazier, submitted by Stephanie Hedgepeth

Best in Show/Youth:  “Little House on the Prairie” by Laura Ingalls Wilder, submitted by  Walker Bixby

Best in Show/Adult:  “Swiss (Cheese) Family Robinson” by Johann David Wyss, submitted by Wesley Dills.

Winners each received a handcrafted notebook, winner’s ribbon and gift certificate.  Photos of entries may be viewed at https://www.ecu.edu/cs-lib/techsrv/edibleabout.cfm

For additional information, contact Dawn Wainwright at 252.328.4090 or wainwrightd@ecu.edu.

– Dawn Wainwright

 

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