Business professor publishes two articles

East Carolina University business professor Mauro Falasca (Marketing and Supply Chain Management) has published two articles: “A two-stage procurement model for humanitarian relief supply chains,” in the Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management and “”Helping a Small Development Organization Manage Volunteers More Efficiently,” in the journal, Interfaces.

Share

ECU history professor featured in London exhibition

Research by ECU professor Timothy Jenks about the River Thames in London, shown above in 1753, appeared in a National Maritime Museum exhibit in London. (Photo from public domain, an image of National Maritime Museum painting by Canaletto (1697–1768))

A chapter written by ECU history professor Timothy Jenks, “Lord Nelson’s Procession by Water: The River Thames and late-Georgian Naval Spectacle,” was included in the exhibition, “The Royal River: Power, Pageantry and the Thames” at the National Maritime Museum in London, England.

Jenks attended the April 25 opening ceremony, where the exhibit was officially opened by the Queen of England. The exhibit was curated by Tudor historian Dr. David Starkey. (Read more about Starkey at www.guardian.co.uk/culture/2012/jan/05/david-starkey-curate-thames-exhibition.)

According to his faculty web site at http://www.ecu.edu/cs-cas/history/Jenks.cfm, Jenks is a historian of eighteen-century Britain, specializing in the study of political culture and national identity. He has conducted research at the National Maritime Museum and previously contributed to their exhibitions and catalogues. His most recent book, “Naval Engagements: Patriotism, Cultural Politics and the Royal Navy, 1793-1815), published by Oxford University Press,  examined the role of naval images in British political culture.

Prior to coming to ECU in 2002, Jenks taught at the University of Toronto, York University and the University of California at Berkeley.

Additional information about the exhibition is available at http://www.rmg.co.uk/national-maritime-museum/  and http://www.rmg.co.uk/visit/events/royal-river. The exhibition catalogue (where the Jenks article appears) is available at http://shop.rmg.co.uk/national-maritime-museum/books-prints/guidebooks-exhibition-catalogues/product/royal-river-power-pageantry-and-the-thames.html.

Share

Joyner Library faculty report publications

Joyner Library faculty have reported recent publications, as follows:

Matt Reynolds, digital collections librarian, and Dale Sauter, manuscript curator, collaborated with former staff member Gypse Legge on a chapter in a new book, “Past or Portal – Enhancing Undergraduate Learning through Special Collections and Archives,” published by the Association of College and Research Library. For more details, visit http://www.alastore.ala.org/detail.aspx?ID=3828.

Reynolds also published “Lay of the Land: The State of Bibliographic Instruction Efforst in ARL Special Collections Libraries,” in RBM: A Journal of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Cultural Heritage 13 (Spring, 2012): 13-26.

Share

KUSHA: Iran’s use of police hinders modernization

East Carolina University criminal justice professor Hamid R. Kusha said that an ancient system continues to impede Iran’s efforts to modernize its national police force.

Dr. Hamid Kusha

In his case study “Impediments to Police Modernization in Iran, 1878-1979,” published recently in Policing and Society, Kusha discusses the history of policing in Iran and the many failed tries at modernizing the country’s National Police.

Historic misuse of its national police force stems from an ancient system that protects the interest of the country’s rulers rather than its citizens, Kusha said. That system presents a roadbloack to the country’s modernization.

In the study Kusha dissects the inability of Iran’s police to function as a neutral law enforcement institution, from the country’s ancient past to the Islamic revolution in 1979. He details the antiquated modes and methods of Iran’s police, failed modernization efforts by the Qajaar and Pahlavi regimes, the geopolitics of Western economies hungry for Iranian oil and raw products and the capitalism-based modernization schemes of the 19th and 20thcenturies.

Kusha said that through all of Iran’s regime changes and attempts at democratization and modernization, the police have been used to enforce the arbitrary will of the powerful. For example, in trying to modernize Iran in the 1930s, Reza Shah used the police in forced unveilings of Muslim women and girls, and he authorized police use of illegal intelligence gathering.

Policing in Iran lacks the basic principles of professional Western policing constructed upon informed consent and the presumption of innocence, Kusha said. He said Iran’s National Police force lacks an institutionalized sense of justice and citizens do not perceive the force as protectors.

“Looking at the present turmoil in the Middle East from Afghanistan to the west coast of north Africa, one could argue that police institutions have played significant roles in the suppression of dissent in these countries, be it political or social,” said Kusha. “New emerging regimes must avoid turning the police into an instrument of suppression. The police must be in sync with overall democratization of the state.”

Kusha said the U.S. departments of State, Justice, Defense and Homeland Security have lessons to learn as well.

He said, “The MO of these departments in the past is that whoever is capable of subduing malcontents regardless of methods is helping U.S. interest in the region. The new policy must be, whoever is trying to democratize the state and its policing apparatus in Middle Eastern countries is our friend in the long run.”

To read the full text of “Impediments to Police Modernization in Iran, 1878-1979,” visit http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10439463.2012.661430#tabModule

 

Share

Medical faculty members edit new publication

A new book edited by ECU professors Drs. Ronald Perkin, William Novotny and Irma Fiordalisi was published by World Scientific Press.

Titled, “The PICU Book: A Primer for Medical Students, Residents and Acute Care Practitioners,” the book is available at amazon.com ( http://www.amazon.com/The-Picu-Book-Residents-Practitioners/dp/9814329606/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1334934435&sr=1-1)

Perkin is professor and chair of pediatrics at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University and co-medical director of Vidant Children’s Hospital. Fiordalisi is professor and chief of pediatric critical care. Novotny is professor and critical care specialist.

Share

Joyner Library faculty, staff report publications

The following employees in Joyner Library at East Carolina University have published materials in their field:

Linda Teel published “Staffing the CMC for Success,” in Curriculum Materials Collections and Centers: Legacies from the Past, Visions of the Future, edited by Rita Kohrman. Chicago:  Association of College and Research Libraries, 2012.

Also in Curriculum Materials Collections and Centers: Legacies from the Past, Visions of the Future, an article by Hazel Walker, “Building a Successful Outreach Program.”

Maury York published, “The North Carolina State Library as a Cultural Resource, 1812-1914” in the January 2012 issue of the North Carolina Historical Review.

###

Share

Allied health’s role in health care reform focus of article

An article by College of Allied Health Sciences dean Dr. Stephen W. Thomas with co-editors Dr. Lee McLean, UNC-Chapel Hill, and Alisa Debnam, Council for Allied Health in N.C., “The Role of Allied Health in Health Care Reform,” was published in the September/October 2011 edition of the North Carolina Medical Journal.

The article is available at http://www.ncmedicaljournal.com/archives/?72522.

Share