Judges sought for Research and Creative Achievement Week

The East Carolina University Division of Research and Graduate Studies is seeking judges for Research and Creative Achievement Week 2013.

RCAW showcases undergraduate and graduate student research and creative achievement. Graduate student day is scheduled for April 8 and undergraduate student day is April 10

Judges are needed in all categories.

The division is using a short Qualtrics survey to collect information from potential judges to help in scheduling.  Individuals who are willing to volunteer are asked to fill out the survey at http://blog.ecu.edu/sites/rcaw/list-of-judges/.  The site also has judging criteria and other information.

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ECU students share research on graduate education day

ECU graduate students Bradley Eidschun, Daniel Zapf and Mahealani Kaneshiro-Pineiro represented East Carolina University in North Carolina’s Graduate Education Day May 23 in Raleigh. (Contributed photo)

 

 Three East Carolina University graduate students displayed their research at the North Carolina Capitol Building in Raleigh May 23 as part of North Carolina’s Graduate Education Week, May 20-26.

Mahealani Kaneshiro-Pineiro, Bradley Eidschun and Daniel Zapf from ECU joined students from Duke, Wake Forest and other UNC system universities at the event, which was designed to recognize the contributions that graduate education makes to the scientific, cultural, and economic needs of the state and global communities.

The three ECU students set up posters highlighting their research projects. They met with ECU Chief of Staff Phillip Rogers, the university’s liaison with the state legislature, and discussed their research with a number of elected officials, including Rep. Marian McLawhorn, Rep. Bill Cook, Rep. G.L. Pridgen, Rep. Tim Spear and Sen. Stan White.

Additional information about the students follows:

Kaneshiro-Pineiro

A native of Oahu, Hawaii, Kaneshiro-Pineiro is a PhD candidate in coastal resources management. She has a master’s degree in zoology and a bachelor’s in marine science from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and Hilo, respectively. She has conducted research throughout the Pacific, including Midway Atoll and Okinawa, Japan. Her research interests include jellyfish ecology and jellyfish-human interactions. Kaneshiro-Pineiro presented research on the biology and tourism effects of Sea Nettle jellyfish. Her faculty mentor is David Kimmel, assistant professor of biology in the Harriot College of Arts and Sciences and the Institute for Coastal Science and Policy.

Eidschun

Arizona native Eidschun has just completed a master’s degree in mathematics at ECU and holds a bachelor’s in mathematics and computer science from UNC-Pembroke. His research examined a method for modeling tsunami and rogue waves, as well as the impact these waves could have on the North Carolina coast. ECU mathematics professors David Pravica and Mike Spurr served as Eidschun’s mentors.

Zapf

Master’s degree student Zapf, of Rochester, N.Y., has a bachelor’s degree in environmental biology from the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry.  He has worked for the Illinois Natural History Survey studying fisheries ecology in Lake Michigan. Zapf’s research examined critical river herring nursery habitats in the Albemarle Sound using otolith microchemistry. His faculty mentor is Roger Rulifson, professor of biology in the Harriot College of Arts and Sciences and the Institute for Coastal Science and Policy

Accompanying the students were their faculty mentors, ECU Graduate School Dean Paul Gemperline, along with Graduate School Associate Deans Thomas J. McConnell and Belinda Patterson. Gemperline is the president of the North Carolina Conference of Graduate Schools for 2011-2012.

Governor Bev Perdue signed a proclamation in January declaring May 23 as Graduate Education Day and May 20-26 as Graduate Education Week in North Carolina.

Faculty, administrators and students were among the ECU attendees at Graduate Education Day.

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Researchers seek volunteers for generation gap investigation

East Carolina University child development and family relations professor Dr. Mark White is among a group of researchers who are investigating whether the generation gap truly exists.

Researchers in The Generations Project are seeking volunteers to complete a survey that should highlight generational differences related to the economy, society, workplace, family and relationships.

Dr. Mark White

White said that the concept of a generation gap is generally accepted.  “We talk about the silent generation, baby boomers, the millennials, and generation x and y,” he said.

“However, there are very little empirical data documenting clear and consistent generational differences,” White said.

White said that The Generations Project is among the first research studies nationwide that examines similarities and differences between the generations.

“The findings will provide insights into some of the larger societal trends that may play out in government, business, education, and families. The results we obtain will provide data to inform educational and business practices, workplace interactions, and public policy,” he said.

The researchers are seeking volunteers to take a survey related to the economy, society, workplace, family and relationships. Participants of all ages are asked to log in to take a 30- to 45-minute survey by Dec. 1 at http://www.generations-project.com/index.html.

Survey participants are anonymous and will not be contacted.

In addition to White, the Generation Project researchers include Drs. W. Jared DuPree, assistant professor in family therapy at the University of Houston – Clear Lake; Tim Rarick, Brigham Young University – Idaho; Katherine Hertlein, assistant professor in the marriage and family therapy program at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Mary Short, associate professor of clinical psychology at the University of Houston – Clear Lake; Sharon Hall, professor of psychology at the University of Houston – Clear Lake. White is associate professor of child development and family relations in the ECU College of Human Ecology.

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For additional information, contact White at 252-737-2076 or by e-mail,
 whitem@ecu.edu

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ECU study examines sleep and fatigue in chronically ill mothers

Carmel White

Mark White

 

Health care providers should be particularly attentive to supporting high quality sleep for chronically ill mothers of young children, according to a new study by East Carolina University researchers.

Professors Carmel White and Mark White in ECU’s Department of Child Development and Family Relations, examined the sleep patterns of chronically ill mothers with young children to determine how they manage sleep and fatigue. The researchers questioned 103 mothers with multiple sclerosis, 68 with rheumatoid arthritis and 91 with normal health about their sleep, fatigue, pain and levels of depression. All participants had at least once child between the age of 12 months and 45 months.

The researchers surveyed the mothers about their problems falling asleep; trouble sleeping after being awakened; sleep interruptions from their young children; average hours of sleep; and fatigue during the day.

“Understanding how sleep relates to depression and fatigue in mothers with MS or RA is important for mothers, families and health care providers,” said Dr. Carmel White.

She said families and health care providers should be sensitive to the importance of high quality sleep, doing what they can to support the mothers.

“Health care professionals should be especially sensitive to both pain and depression in mothers with MS or RA to ensure that these two common problems are not interfering with mothers’ sleep,” she said.

Mothers with chronic illnesses reported more daytime drowsiness, with reduced sleep quality and quantity especially noted in mothers experiencing a flareup of RA symptoms. Chronically ill mothers reported mother problems going to sleep and staying asleep, but were less likely to experience nighttime sleep interruptions caused by their children. The researchers speculated that other family members might be caring for the young children during the night, knowing that the mother has difficulty falling back to sleep.

Mothers with MS had the highest correlation of sleep problems correlated to fatigue, suggesting that health care providers who work with MS patients should include sleep assessments.

The researchers said that women with chronic illnesses often experience a great deal of fatigue, and parenting young children can add to the exhaustion.

Their research, “Sleep Problems and Fatigue in Chronically Ill Women,” appeared in the July issue of Behaviorial Sleep Medicine. Full text of the article may be viewed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21722010.

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For additional information, contact Carmel White at 252-737-2075 or whitec@ecu.edu or Mark Shite at 252-737-2076 or whitem@ecu.edu.

The Department of Child Development and Family Relations is located within the ECU College of Human Ecology.

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ECU faculty research draws attention in Charlotte museum

Research by East Carolina University faculty at the Bechtler Museum of Modern Art in Charlotte was featured in the museum’s blog at http://nashermuseumblogs.

Dr. Cynthia Bickley-Green, associate professor in the School of Art and Design, and Dr. Nicholas Murray, director of the Visual Motor Laboratory in the College of Health and Human Performance, developed the research. The study tracks eye movement in response to artwork, exploring relations between oral prompts, cognition and eye-tracking patterns.  A qualitative questionnaire gathers information about the beholders’ aesthetic response to the experience.

The study is part of a larger group of museum and gallery studies that began in the Greenville Museum of Art. It is entitled “Mobile Eye-Tracker (MET) Gaze Patterns Generated by Artworks and Museum Locations.” Results should provide data that may help researchers understand people’s thinking patterns, which could be applicable for related disabilities and overall improved communication.

The full blog post on the research is available at http://nashermuseumblogs.org/?p=4211.

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