College of Education awards scholarships to 73 students

College of Education Dean Dr. Linda Patriarca, left, congratulations scholarship winner Vasti Rodriguez at an Aug. 22 event. (Contributed photo)

College of Education Dean Dr. Linda Patriarca, left, congratulates scholarship winner Vasti Rodriguez at an Aug. 22 event. (Contributed photo)

Seventy-three East Carolina University students, including nine from the Greenville area, have been awarded more than $200,000 in scholarships by the College of Education.

The scholarships, ranging from $250 to $7,000 each, were given to outstanding education students for the 2014-2015 academic year.

Private donations fund the scholarships that were created to honor and memorialize outstanding educators and the profession in support of the academic pursuits of future teachers.

The scholarship recipients were recognized at a ceremony Aug. 22 at Rock Springs Center, including the following local students: Meredith Rose Clark of Greenville, Angel Boberg-Webb Memorial Scholarship and the Pat and Lynn Lane Scholarship; Arthur P. Nava of Winterville, Burney & Judy Warren Scholarship and the Tony R. Banks Scholarship in Special Education; Dawn Hester of Greenville, Carol Smith Gardner Education Leadership Fellowship; Brett T. Congleton of Winterville, Craig W. and Ruth T. Joyner Family Scholarship; Philip David Ellis of Winterville, David and BJ Fisher Scholarship; Chena Cayton of Grimesland, Dianne and Chip Linville Doctoral Fellowship Endowment Fund and the Mack and Margaret Coble Doctoral Fellowship; Vasti Rodriguez of Greenville, Dr. Suzanne Wester, M.D. Scholarship; Summer Nicole Briley of Stokes, James H. and Connie M. Maynard Scholarship; and Scott P. Haddock of Greenville, Marjorie Harrison Pi Omega Pi Freshman Award.

The mission of the College of Education is the preparation of professional educators and allied practitioners, including professionals in business information systems, counseling, electronic media and librarianship. For more information, visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/.

 

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Incoming EC Scholars prepare for fall during Ocracoke retreat

Incoming EC Scholars Kevin Nguyen, foreground, and Vivian Holt embark for a kayaking tour of Ocracoke Island during the EC Scholars retreat in August.

Incoming EC Scholars Kevin Nguyen, foreground, and Vivian Holt embark for a kayaking tour of Ocracoke Island during the EC Scholars retreat in August. (Photos courtesy of ECU Honors College)

By Jessica Nottingham
ECU Honors College

Between serious sessions of charades, beach games and group dinners, the incoming class of EC Scholars participated in leadership training that included topics such as professional etiquette, time management and work-life balance during a retreat the week before the start of fall semester.

Each year, East Carolina University’s Honors College hosts a retreat on Ocracoke Island for freshmen EC Scholars, recipients of ECU’s most prestigious undergraduate scholarship award. The retreat prepares this high-achieving new crop of students for a healthy and successful college career.

“The EC Scholar freshmen Ocracoke retreat is a unique opportunity for our incoming class to cultivate relationships and foster a strong sense of community before they arrive on campus,” said Dr. Todd Fraley, director of the EC Scholars program. “Over the course of three days, they participated in team-building activities, networked with faculty and upperclassmen EC Scholars and completed a leadership development program created by ECU’s Adventure office.”

Leadership training and team building exercises help build community within the new class of scholars.

Leadership training and team building exercises help build community within the new class of scholars.

ECU’s Adventure program took students through activities that brought awareness to various leadership styles, group problem-solving and building trust.

“Students arrive to college in a daze,” said Brad Beggs, assistant director of the ECU Adventure Program. “Among approximately 4,000 incoming students, most new freshmen feel lost, a bit alone and unsure how to have success. This type of orientation session lets the EC Scholars make friends before classes begin and learn specific skills that help them adapt to and succeed here at ECU.”

EC Scholar Lillie Malpass of Hallsboro observed the group learning the value of incorporating different ideas. “Most of us are natural leaders—we learned how to listen to each other and not always be in charge,” said Malpass. “We are all comfortable with leading and sharing ideas so we had to work with all of our different ideas during the activity.”

Taking advantage of the locale, the adventure program team led the class on a two-mile kayaking tour of Ocracoke, highlighting pirate and Revolutionary War history as well as some sea level rise concerns, said Beggs.

Wayne ’64 and Sherry ’74 Holloman of Greenville sponsored this year’s trip, making it cost-free for the students. “Thanks to donors like the Hollomans, our scholars enter their freshmen year with a sense of belonging and an awareness of the commitment ECU has made to their success,” said Fraley.

For more information about the Honors College and EC Scholars scholarship award program, visit www.ecu.edu/ecscholars.

 

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LGBT Resource Office to screen Emmy award winning movie

East Carolina University’s LGBT Office will screen the Emmy award winning movie, “The Normal Heart,” at 7 p.m. Sept. 15 in Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student Center.

normalheartThe 2014 Emmy award winner for best television movie stars Academy Award winner Julia Roberts, Academy Award nominee Mark Ruffalo, Emmy Award winner Jim Parsons, along with Matt Bomer and Taylor Kitsch.

“Though it has taken almost 30 years to make it from the stage to the screen, ‘The Normal Heart’ still conveys all the passion, rage, and heart wrenching emotion as it did when it premiered at New York’s Public Theater in 1985,” said Mark Rasdorf, assistant director of the ECU LGBT Resource Office.

“This will be an intense film experience for all in attendance. We also hope this leads to creating dialogue and discussions on campus and in the community.”

“The Normal Hearttells the story of the onset of the HIV-AIDS crisis in New York City in the early 1980s.  The movie examines the nation’s sexual politics as gay activists and their allies in the medical community fight to expose the truth about the burgeoning epidemic to a city and nation in denial.

The screening is free and free parking will be available from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. in the ECU parking lot located at the corner of 9th Street and Evans Street.

The LGBT Resource Office and the Student Activities Board Film Committee are presenting the screening, with support from the Center for Diversity and Inequality Research and the Department of English. The screening has been approved as a Premier Passport Event for ECU’s Wellness Passport program for students.

For more information, call the LGBT Resource Office at (252) 737-2514.

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ECU graduate students fire kiln at North Carolina Pottery Center

Randolph County potter Joseph Sands, at left, hosted ECU graduate students Devin McKim and Erin Younge during their summer internship.

Randolph County potter Joseph Sands, at left, hosted ECU graduate students Devin McKim and Erin Younge during their summer internship.

As part of a summer internship finale, two East Carolina University graduate students will fire a groundhog kiln on the lawn of the North Carolina Pottery Center today.

Erin Younge, a third-year graduate student in ECU’s ceramics program, has been teaching clay programs for all ages. Devin McKim, a second-year graduate student, has been working with local Randleman potter Joseph Sands to learn production ceramic techniques. The student internships are part of an ongoing collaboration between ECU and the pottery center.

The firing of the groundhog kiln takes approximately 15 hours and uses two cords of wood.  “Firing a groundhog kiln is a great introduction to Seagrove pottery,” McKim said. “I am excited to be joining in on that traditional style of salt firing.”

Also on Aug. 2, there will be a Raku firing demonstration. Younge and McKim will explain the firing process and answer questions from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. today and Saturday.

The Raku firing will be divided into smaller batches to fire, remove and fume – and then repeat with each batch – to give visitors a chance to see finished pieces more quickly than most types of firings.

“I am amazed by the range of color that Raku firings produce,” said Younge. “The transformation that takes place in both the clay and the glaze by using simple combustible materials like sawdust or flowers is always a treat.”

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

The center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove. It’s open Tuesday through Saturday 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. For more information, call 336-873-8430 or go to www.ncpotterycenter.org.

 

 

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