Polar Bear Plunge set for Jan. 22

Jumpers from the 2014 Polar Bear Plunge prepare to take a dip in the icy waters of the outdoor pool at ECU's Student Recreation Center.

Jumpers at the 2014 Polar Bear Plunge prepare to take a dip in the icy waters of the outdoor pool at ECU’s Student Recreation Center.

The 19th Annual Polar Bear Plunge will be held at the Student Recreation Center at 7 p.m. Jan. 22. Registration begins at 6:30 p.m. and at 7 p.m., ECU students, faculty and staff will take the plunge into the icy waters of the outdoor swimming pool.

This event began in 1997 with only 35 participants, as a part of the grand opening week for the Student Recreation Center. For the past three years, jumpers have numbered more than 1,000 each year.

The first event started with only 35 participants and has had over 1,000 participants for the last three years.

Swimsuits are required and participants should bring their own towel. T-Shirts are guaranteed for the first 1,100 jumpers.

For additional information, contact Campus Recreation & Wellness at 252-328-6387 or visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-studentaffairs/crw/programs/special_events/polarbear-plunge.cfm.

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ECU student becomes Red Hat Certified Engineer

ECU junior Benjamin Tillett-Wakeley has passed requirements to become a Red Hat Certified Engineer.

Tillett-Wakeley

Tillett-Wakeley

A former film theory major, Benjamin Tillett-Wakeley transferred in fall 2013 into ECU’s information and computer technology program in technology systems in the College of Engineering and Technology.

In December, Tillett-Wakeley became a Red Hat Certified Engineer, which according to the Red Hat website, indicates that he “possesses the additional skills, knowledge, and abilities required of a senior system administrator responsible for Red Hat Enterprises Linux systems.”

Red Hat, based in Raleigh, is a multinational software company providing open-source software products.

Tillett-Wakeley said his interest in Linux, an open computer operating system, inspired him to sit for the certification exam. “The RHCE is a widely-recognized Linux certification and it will benefit me when applying to jobs that require knowledge of Linux,” he said. “The exam was difficult, but I was well-prepared. It’s a bit trickier than other certifications because it’s entirely lab based.”

Tillett-Wakeley is from Kitty Hawk.

“Film-making will always be an interest of mine, but I realized I wanted something that would provide a more stable career,” Tillett-Wakeley said. “I chose ECU because it offers solid courses at a great value. The ICT curriculum is well-designed and offers the types of courses I wanted.”

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ECU College of Engineering and Technology student, instructor win national award

Pictured at the award event are industry partner Shixiong Shang of Nephos6, ECU senior Dustin Stocks, ECU instructor John Pickard, and Dr. Ciprian Popoviciu, founder and CEO of Nephos6, based in Raleigh.

Pictured at the award event are industry partner Shixiong Shang of Nephos6, ECU senior Dustin Stocks, ECU instructor John Pickard, and Dr. Ciprian Popoviciu, founder and CEO of Nephos6, based in Raleigh.

Dustin Stocks, an information and computer technology major at East Carolina University, and ECU instructor John Pickard recently won the Academic Innovations award at the North American IPv6 Summit in Denver, Colorado.

Pickard, who teaches in the Department of Technology Systems in the College of Engineering and Technology, and Stocks presented research and findings from what started as a collaborative class project at ECU with industry partner, Nephos6.

Pickard uses industry partners in his courses because “direct industry engagement in the classroom creates a mutually beneficial relationship between students, industry, and academia,” he said.

Stocks and ECU classmate Ryan Hammond worked with Nephos6, a cloud technology firm in Raleigh whose founder and CEO, Dr. Ciprian Popoviciu, has supported the ICT program for many years.

The project researched the effectiveness of 263 government agency websites that have enabled the new Internet Protocol version 6, commonly referred to as IPv6. The original IPv6 transition timeline set by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget has not been met by many federal government agencies.

Under the direction of Pickard and Popoviciu, the ECU students evaluated the government websites by using v6Sonar, a cloud based monitoring service developed by Nephos6. “This is important, valuable and actionable data that helps organizations make their IPv6 transition effective,” Popoviciu said.

Stocks, a former Marine, said his military experience helped to prepare him for his education. “The military taught me how to set a goal, and achieve that goal with efficiency and effectiveness. Learning how to set goals and prioritize tasks has been the key to succeeding this far with this project, and college in general,” Stocks said.

Networking with industry representatives at the summit boosted his confidence in securing a job after graduation in May, he said. “Seeing the application of what I’m learning in the classroom and being able to see the big picture and how it fits in context with my education is important,” Stocks said. “The biggest thing I took away from this experience is how important it is to not do anything half way but do everything to your full potential.”

The award was given because of the outstanding work that Stocks continued after meeting the requirement of the class project. There is likely future research associated with this project based on the favorable response of the summit attendees, Pickard said.

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ECU senior honored for community service

Zachary Baker

Zachary Baker

ECU senior Zachary Baker has been recognized by North Carolina Campus Compact, a statewide network of colleges and universities committed to community engagement, for his outstanding leadership and service. Baker is a recipient of the network’s Community Impact Student Award, which honors one student leader at each member school.

Baker is one of 18 students across the state to receive the 2014 award, joining more than 200 college students honored by the organization since the award was first presented in 2006.

At ECU, Baker has been a key figure in ECU’s Campus Kitchen project, serving as a shift leader, shift manager, and on the leadership team. Through his work, he inspires others to take action against hunger in Greenville.

Baker has worked for four years at the university’s Volunteer and Service-Learning Center (VSLC), first as an event coordinator and now as OrgSync training coordinator. In this role, Baker teaches students and community agencies to use ECU’s new web-based service management system, helping connect more than 6,000 users to service opportunities.

A double major in health services management and chemistry, Baker is from Fayetteville.

“Whether he’s working behind the scenes managing our OrgSync platform or interacting with a new student who is looking to get involved, Zach empowers others to learn through service,” said VSLC Assistant Director Nichelle Shuck.

Baker and other award winners were honored at the compact’s annual student conference on Nov. 8 at N.C. State University.

North Carolina Campus Compact is a collaborative network of colleges and universities with a shared commitment to educating engaged citizens and strengthening communities. The compact was founded in 2002 and is hosted by Elon University.

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ECU literary magazine named a Pacemaker Award finalist

East Carolina University’s student-run literary magazine, Rebel, was named one of five category finalists for the Associated Collegiate Press Pacemaker award, four-year literary magazine category.

rebelThe winners were announced at the Annual ACP/College Media Advisers National College Media Convention Oct. 29-Nov. 1 in Philadelphia.  Rebel 56 was nominated along with arts and literary magazines from Jacksonville University, Mercer University, Appalachian State University and Bridgewater State University. Winners were The Bridge from Bridgewater and The Peel from Appalachian State.

Since 1927, the Pacemaker has been the highest honor available to ACP members and still today is considered one of the most prestigious awards in collegiate media.  Being a nominee signifies Rebel as one of the top literary magazines in the country. Rebel won the Pacemaker Award in 2009.

Rebel 56 was published in Spring 2014. The editor in chief was Megan Burns.

“Megan and her team put together a tremendous magazine,” said John Harvey, ECU director of student media.  “This year’s team is equally strong. Perhaps next year we can win it all.”

Rebel is part the office of Student Media in the Division of Student Affairs at ECU.  Along with Rebel, Student Media oversees WZMB 91.3 FM, the campus radio station; Buccaneer, the university yearbook; Expressions multicultural magazine; a new magazine that will debut in Spring 2015, The Hook; The East Carolinian student newspaper, and its companion website theeastcarolinian.com. Student Media also operates a student Advertising & Marketing Agency.

All of the organizations that come under Student Media are staffed and operated by East Carolina students.

The Associated Collegiate Press is a nonprofit education membership association and a division of the National Scholastic Press Association. The ACP has had college members since its inception in 1921 and is the largest and oldest membership organization for college student media in the United States.

For additional information, contact John Harvey at 252-328-9234 or harveyj@ecu.edu.  For more details about ECU Student Media, visit www.ecu.edu/studentmedia.

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