Engineering Student Receives Scholarship

Anderson

       Anderson

Byron Anderson, a senior engineering student, has been awarded the Ronald C. Harrell Engineering Scholarship from the North Carolina Society of Engineers. Anderson, who is completing a double concentration in mechanical and industrial engineering, is from Wilson.

Each year, the NCSE awards a $2,000 scholarship to a student enrolled in engineering or engineering technology at one of five universities in North Carolina. A student must show financial need, good citizenship and strong academic merit. The scholarship honors Harrell, who was an outstanding NCSE member, former president and district director of the society.

Anderson decided to attend ECU because it was close to home and the engineering program was “rapidly growing,” he said. “My experience at ECU has been good,” Anderson said. “It was not only accumulated in the classroom. Faculty members help students grow as a person. I am not the person that I once was and I owe a lot of that to the engineering department.”

National champion swimmers return to campus

Left to right Jeff Faucette, Jack McCann and Jake Smith as they appeared in a Sept. 2014 visit to campus, above, and on the ECU swim team in the late 1950s.

Left to right Jeff Faucette, Jack McCann and Jake Smith as they appeared in a Sept. 2014 visit to campus, upper image, and on the ECU swim team in the late 1950s, below.

Three members of East Carolina’s 1959 NAIA national championship swim team returned to campus the weekend of Sept. 20 to attend a reunion of the Sigma Nu fraternity.

Jeff Faucette, Jack McCann and Jake Smith were among 10 swimmers on the 1957 and 1959 teams selected as All-Americans. McCann and Smith each won six events at national competitions. McCann swam the breaststroke and is credited with inventing what’s called the whip kick that now is widely used in competitive swimming.

East Carolina’s swim team also won the 1957 NAIA national championships.

Several members of both national championship swim teams were Sigma Nu brothers. Sigma Nu was among the first social fraternities on campus. The fraternity closed several years ago but is slated to officially return to campus in 2016.

Faucette now lives in Fort Mill, South Carolina. Smith lives in Hickory and McCann lives in Morehead City.

– Steve Tuttle

The national champion East Carolina swim team.

The national champion East Carolina swim team.

ECU’s Joyner Library to mark Banned Books Week

East Carolina University’s Joyner Library and Department of English will mark Banned Books Week on Thursday with a Read Out and program.

annedbooksBanned Books Week is an annual event held the last week in September that celebrates Americans’ freedom to read and the importance of the First Amendment.

The Read Out will begin at 4:30 p.m. in the Sonic Plaza outside of the library. ECU students and faculty are invited to read excerpts from banned or challenged books. Readers are invited to bring their own books; organizers will also have books available. A program about book burning and banning will follow at 5:30 p.m. in Joyner Library room 2409. Both events are free and open to the public.

“Joyner Library is proud to be the host and co-sponsor of ECU’s Banned Books Reading Event,” said Jan Lewis, interim dean of Academic Library Services. “Co-sponsored by the American Library Association, Banned Books Week celebrates the freedom to read and to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider threatening or unorthodox. Many of my favorite books are on the ALA’s list of banned and challenged books, making it hard to choose just one to read from on Thursday. Come to the Reading Event – you may be surprised by what you hear.

Banned Books Week is also sponsored by the American Booksellers Association; American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression; American Society of Journalists and Authors; Association of American Publishers; and the National Association of College Stores. It is endorsed by the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress.

“Sigma Tau Delta, the English Club, and the English Department feel honored to help host the discussion of banned books,” said Dr. Corinee Guy, professor of English. “We hope the audience will participate during the program, and afterwards continue to question our rights and responsibilities in a free society.”

Organizer of the Read Out Margaret Earley-Thiele added, “We are excited to hold a Read Out, one of several awareness and learning events scheduled during the week.”

For more information, contact Dawn Wainwright at 252.328.4090 or wainwrightd@ecu.edu.

 

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ECU leaders helping to reshape American medical education

On Sept. 22 and 23, leaders from the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University are joining leaders from 10 other top medical schools at Vanderbilt University to discuss next steps in preparing medical students for the changing health care landscape.

The 11 medical schools were awarded $1 million each by the American Medical Association last fall to participate in their Accelerating Change in Medical Education initiative to reshape the way medical students are educated in this country.

“There has been a universal call to shift the focus of medical education toward real-world practice and competency assessment,” said Robert M. Wah, M.D., president of the AMA, the national organization dedicated to empowering the nation’s physicians to continually provide safer, higher quality, and more efficient care to patients and communities.

“The AMA is proud to be leading the charge to answer this call,” Wah said. “Over the last year, we have made significant progress in transforming curriculum at these medical schools that will help close the gaps that currently exist between how medical students are trained and the way health care is delivered in this country now and in the future.”

Wah said the Brody School of Medicine was selected for the grant based on their bold and innovative ideas, including their new comprehensive Longitudinal Core Curriculum in patient safety, which was implemented in fall 2014 for all medical students. The project aims to foster inter-pro­fessional skills and prepare students to successfully lead multidisciplinary health care teams.

Brody also established a new academy to provide faculty development in patient safety, quality improvement and team-based care. And beginning in spring 2015, they will enroll 10 medical students per year in advanced course work and experiential activities that will earn them a Certificate in Healthcare Transformation and Leadership along with their M.D. degrees.

“More and more in medical education and higher education, it’s not about lecture-based education; it’s how do you design a more meaningful learning experience,” said Libby Baxley, M.D., senior associate dean for academic affairs at Brody.

Over the next four years, the AMA will continue to track the progress of the 11 medical schools’ collective work in order to identify and disseminate the best models for transformative educational change.

Other schools’ projects include a curriculum that gives students with prior health care experience an opportunity to progress through medical school based on individual competency, and courses that ensure medical students are trained on the use of electronic health records. Each school’s grant project can be tracked at http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/about-ama/strategic-focus/accelerating-change-in-medical-education.page.

ECU undergraduate published in Science magazine

ECU undergraduate Joseph West Paul III co-authored a paper on ALS that appeared in September 2014 edition of Science magazine.

Joseph Paul

Joseph Paul

“Clogging information flow in ALS: Dipeptide repeat proteins produced in certain neurodegenerative diseases exert toxicity by blocking RNA biogenesis,“ was co-authored with Aaron D. Gitler of the Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine.

A student of ECU professor Dr. Yiping Qi, Paul completed the article about the possible mechanism of ALS disease during a summer internship at Stanford University. As part of the internship he helped his internship advisor review two original manuscripts on the topic, which resulted in the published article.

Paul is an ECU Honors College student and EC Scholar. He is majoring in biochemistry.