ECU sculpture professor exhibits work in Australia

By Jamitress Bowden
ECU News Services

Residents ‘Down Under’ got a glimpse of artwork from eastern North Carolina, thanks to the efforts of an East Carolina University sculptor.

Red Center (Contributed photo)

ECU professor Carl Billingsley’s work, Red Center, on display in Australia. (Contributed photo)

Carl Billingsley, professor of sculpture in East Carolina University’s School of Art and Design, had his work featured in Australia twice this school year.

Originally, Billingsley’s proposal for an art installation titled “Red Center” was originally chosen for “Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi” last fall. His participation in the show last fall lead to an invitation to another outdoor show, in a different city.

He was offered an opportunity through the Andrea Stetton Memorial Invitation to have his piece included at Cottesloe Beach in Australia in March. The installation took Billingsley one day to install at Cottesloe Beach, with help from 12 volunteers.

“I like to have my pieces in public rather than in a museum. I think more people have an opportunity to see the work,” said Billingsley. “It’s kind of a big event where people are very aware of it and look forward to it and they go out for it.”

“Red Center” is an installation of red and yellow construction flags. He chose Australia as inspiration for the installation, and a well-known Australian landmark as inspiration for the name. “At the very center of the continent, is this vast stone, which the aborigines call Uluru and colonists call Ayers Rock or Red Stone,” said Billingsley.

A close-up look at the Red Center artwork.

A close-up look at the Red Center artwork.

Billingsley decided to enter an installation instead of the traditional form of sculpture. “This is a relatively new endeavor for me, as a professor of sculpture. I’ve always focused a lot of my attention on very traditional materials.”

Both shows have had more than 500,000 people in attendance.

The Great Recycle offers big rewards for recycling

NOTE: Event has been rescheduled to Thursday, April 17th.

East Carolina University students may find big rewards for recycling beverage containers during The Great Recycle event 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. April 15 at Wright Plaza on campus.

A 12-foot tall recycling bin, like the one pictured above at Times Square in Manhattan, will be set up on Wright Plaza at ECU for The Great Recycle on April 15.

A 12-foot tall recycling bin, like the one pictured above at Times Square in Manhattan, will be set up on Wright Plaza at ECU for The Great Recycle on April 15.

The beverage company Honest Tea is sponsoring the event to boost recycling rates as part of a national recycling initiative. Honest Tea representatives will set up a 12-foot tall blue recycling bin to receive empty beverage containers in glass, plastic, aluminum or plastic.

Rewards range from reusable bags to iPad minis, increasing in value the more beverage containers an individual recycles. Participants who bring in 999 bottles may earn an iPad Mini; a reward for 750 bottles is a Go Pro Camera. Additional rewards available while supplies last include bicycles, skate boards, backpacks, gift certificates, T-shirts, sunglasses, reusable bags, bracelets and stickers.

For additional information about the event, visit www.thegreatrecycle.com.

Film director to screen coastal development film at ECU

Ben Kalina

Ben Kalina

Film director Ben Kalina will discuss his documentary on coastal development at a film screening of “Shored Up,” at 7 p.m. April 22 in Wright Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public.

“Shored Up” explores the controversial ongoing development of coastal regions in North Carolina and New Jersey despite coastal storms with the power to devastate those communities.

Corbett

Corbett

“When Superstorm Sandy devastated the East Coast, it was a wake up call to a new reality,” said Dr. D. Reide Corbett, ECU professor of geological sciences and senior scientist with the ECU Institute for Coastal Science and Policy. “‘Shored Up’ takes us to the heart of this coastal controversy, following communities in New Jersey and North Carolina where politics, economics and science collide.”

The documentary was filmed over the course of three years in Long Beach Island, N.J. and the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Coverage culminated with Hurricane Sandy. The film explores political conflicts and personal stakes of communities along the shore. Information is gathered from scientists, politicians, residents and others to expose major hurdles in coastal management and argue for an immediate change.Shored Up Film Poster

Film director Kalina wrote in his film’s synopsis, “‘Shored Up’ is a look at what happens when we ignore the realities of geology in our drive to inhabit and profit from our coastlines. As the oceans rise and storms flood our towns and cities, we have a choice to make: do we continue to develop as we have in the past, ignoring clear risks and danger? Or, do we allow science to guide our policies for the future…before it’s too late?”

In addition to “Shored Up,” Kalina has produced two award-winning documentaries, “Two Square Miles” and “A Sea Change,” both of which have been nationally broadcast in the U.S. He has won several international awards for his short narrative film, “Diorama.”

This event is co-sponsored by the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences Departments of Biology, Geography, Planning and Environment and Geological Sciences; the ECU Chapter of The Coastal Society; ECU’s Center for Sustainability; the ECU Division of Research and Graduate Studies; and the ECU Institute for Coastal Science and Policy.

For additional information, contact Corbett at 252-328-1367 or corbettd@ecu.edu.

Individuals requesting accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) should call 252-737-1016 (voice/TTY) at least 48 hours prior to the events.

 – Lacey Gray

 

Volunteers needed for Pirate Alumni Road Race and Fun Run

The East Carolina Alumni Association is seeking volunteers for the seventh annual Pirate Alumni Road Race and Fun Run “Paint It Purple” Edition on Saturday, April 12.

This year, runners will be dusted with purple and gold powder as they race to support ECU scholarships. Many volunteers are needed to throw color on the runners, re-fill color containers, run the registration table, hand out water cups and monitor the course.

Registration in the event is closed after the event reached maximum capacity of 500 runners earlier than anticipated. However, Pirates can still enjoy the event by participating as a volunteer.

Individuals interested in volunteering can study specific assignments and sign up online at http://www.volunteerspot.com/login/entry/4973114040124#/form.

Individual assignments may differ, but volunteers should plan to arrive around 7 a.m. and be done around 11 a.m. The race begins at 9 a.m.

Proceeds from the race benefit the Alumni Scholarship program for ECU undergraduates.

For questions about the event, contact Shawn Moore, director of Alumni Programs, as Shawn.Moore@PirateAlumni.com or at 252-328-5775.

–Jackie Drake

Founder of One Day Apparel to be featured on alumni radio show

East Carolina University 1972 graduate Larry Clapp, who developed garments designed for cancer patients, will be featured on Pirate Radio April 11 at 6 p.m.

Larry Clapp

Larry Clapp

Clapp will be interviewed on “A Pirate’s Life for Me!” on Pirate Radio 1250 and 930 AM, as part of the East Carolina Alumni Association’s weekly radio show.

Clapp and his children designed the garments for his new business, One Day Apparel, after his wife died from cancer. The garments are intended to maintain both the dignity and comfort of patients undergoing chemotherapy. The long-sleeved shirts keep patients covered and warm, while zippered openings offer access for medical instruments sucha s Port-a-Caths or PIC lines placed in the chest or arm.

PrintThe garments are also designed for everyday wear by non-patients, to establish a community of support for those undergoing treatment. One Day Apparel also sells standard short-sleeved and long-sleeved t-shirts, as well as bracelets. All proceeds benefit cancer research. Read more about the business at www.onedayapparel.com/specialty-garment/.

Clapp is also the owner of Austen, Li & Clapp, a design and marketing firm based in Greensboro. He earned his bachelor’s degree in art.

To listen to this episode, tune to Pirate Radio 1250 or 930 AM or listen live online at www.pirateradio1250.com. A Pirate Radio mobile app is also available for download. For those who cannot tune in, the episode will be archived online at PirateAlumni.com.

Questions about A Pirate’s Life For Me!  can be directed to Jackie Drake, assistant director of alumni communications, at 252-328-4902 or Jackie.Drake@PirateAlumni.com.

 – Jackie Drake