EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ART AND DESIGN 2017 MFA THESIS EXHIBITION

EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ART AND DESIGN 2017 MFA THESIS EXHIBITION
Wellington B. Gray Gallery
April 21 – May 12, 2017

Reception: Friday, May 5, 5:00 PM – 8:00 PM

The Wellington B. Gray Gallery is proud to present the work of seven artists graduating from the Master of Fine Arts program in the School of Art and Design at East Carolina University. The exhibiting artists are Greg Banks, Brett Beasley, Addison Brown, Alex Ingle, Barbara McFadyen, Abir Mohsen and Hosanna Rubio. The exhibit runs from April 21 through May 12, 2017 with a reception in the Gray Gallery to honor the artists on Friday, May 5 from 5:00 until 8:00 p.m. The reception is free and open to the public.

The exhibition includes a wide range of materials and aesthetics with artists representing three studio areas in the School of Art and Design: ceramics, metal design and photography. Greg Banks and Addison Brown are in photography, Brett Beasley, Alex Ingle and Abir Mohsen are in ceramics, and Barbara McFadyen and Hosanna Rubio are in metal design.

Greg Banks

Greg Banks is a photo-based artist currently working on his MFA in photography at East Carolina University in Greenville, NC with a projected completion date of May 2017. He received a B.A. in photography and a B.A. in fine art from Virginia Intermont College in 1998. Greg combines everything from IPhone images to historic 19th century processes, gelatin silver printing, metals, painting and digital printing. His current creative practice investigates family, folklore, memories, Appalachia, history and religion.

Brett Beasley

Brett Beasley is a ceramic artist who earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Florida and his master’s degree from East Carolina University. Beasley exhibits his artwork at both the national and regional level. He participates at craft schools across the United States annually and attends the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts (NCECA) yearly conference. Currently, the inspiration and guiding force of his body of work is centered on illuminating the relationships between geologic phenomena and human’s perception of time and communicating these findings through art. The cyclical nature of this project informs ideas of materiality, time and process.

Addison Brown

Addison Brown is a photography-based artist currently seeking his MFA in photography at East Carolina University in Greenville, NC. He received his BA in photography at the University of Alabama Huntsville in 2012. Brown also employs the mediums of metalsmithing and woodworking to produce engaging and interactive photographic viewing experiences. His current work, Suspension of Disbelief, utilizes the photographic object as a means to challenge active viewership of narrative in the integration of fiction to reality.

Alex Ingle

Alex Ingle was raised near the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains in the town of Eton, Georgia. She received her BFA with a concentration in Ceramics and Printmaking from the University of West Georgia in Carrollton, Georgia. A resident of Greenville, North Carolina, she is an active artist at East Carolina University and in the local community. In 2016, she won Best in Show for Rebel 59 at Pitt County Arts Council at Emerge, placed in the 9th Annual Graduate Show at Joyner Library, and was awarded Juror’s Pick from the Annual Pitt Community College Student Show.

Alex’s work is influenced by her small town regional experiences and upbringing within a single parent household. Being raised by a strong independent mother could not prevent the effects of societal expectations of love, beauty, and gender Alex was exposed to through the media. Her work empowers individualism and critiques society’s version of a healthy self.

Barbara McFadyen

Barbara McFadyen is a metalsmith and enamelist who has been designing jewelry in gold, silver, and enamel for over three decades. She has become nationally recognized through exhibitions with the American Crafts Council, the Smithsonian Institution, SNAG, and the Enamelist Society. Her education began with a BA in Creative Arts from Eckerd College, St Petersburg, Florida. She continued her jewelry studies with Parson’s School of Design in Japan at the Tokyo Designer College, and enameling at Kulicke Starke Academy in NYC. Many summer studies were spent at Penland, Arrowmont, and Haystack with notable enamelists such as Bill Helwig, Martha Banyas, Jamie Bennett, Mary Chuduck, and Elizabeth Turrell. Through an “Enameling for Bookmaking” workshop at Penland, Barbara was introduced to the format of the artist book. Barbara is most passionate about exploring ways to combine her metalwork with this new medium, as she finds both jewelry and books fascinating as intimate objects, either to be worn or held in the hand. Barbara has been a partner in Creative Metalsmiths since 1982, an all hand-wrought jewelry gallery in Chapel Hill. She is passionate about enameling and recently curated “A Sense of Color” an invitational enameling exhibition featuring ECU metalsmiths and enamelists. In addition to her own artistic work, Barbara has taught workshops at several craft schools including John Campbell Folk School, Arrowmont, Peter’s Valley, Penland School of Crafts, and most recently in Kobe, Japan at the Kobe Design University. Barbara enjoys working in her studio in Chapel Hill, where she resides with her husband Douglass Phillips, four children and five grandchildren and her favorite dog, Bodhi. She presently serves on the board of directors for The Nicholson Foundation, the Grable Foundation, and Penlan

Abir Mohsen

Abir Mohsen is a graduate student who is pursuing an MFA in Ceramics degree here at ECU. She lived most of her life in Lumberton North Carolina. Mohsen has earned an undergraduate degree in Art Education K-12 from the Unversity of Noth Carolina at Pembroke. Inspired by her early childhood while living in Gaza, most of Mohsen’s work discusses a context of conflict, war, and diaspora, especially within a child’s life. Her work also discusses how the concept of a sanctuary is desired for as a result of trauma and displacement in a time where the sense of national identity was not fully formed.

Hosanna Rubio

Born and raised in Southern California, Hosanna Rubio currently resides in Greenville, North Carolina, where she attends East Carolina University as an MFA candidate in the Metal Design program. She received her BA in Art Education from California State University Long Beach, where she also studied Metals and Jewelry. Hosanna specializes in creating wearable art pieces and small-scale sculptures that explore themes inspired by her personal experiences with issues such as health, medicine, and nature. Her work has been exhibited regionally and nationally.

The Wellington B. Gray Gallery is located off of 5th and Jarvis Streets on the campus of East Carolina University in the Jenkins Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. The gallery is closed for all University holidays. Jenkins Fine Arts Center is handicapped accessible. Individuals with disabilities who require accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) should contact the Department of Disability Support Services, at least two weeks prior to the event (252) 737-1016.

 

MFA Ceramics Candidate Rachel Clark has been selected as a Niche Award Finalist

East Carolina University is home to one of the top five ceramic finalists for the Niche Award

MFA ceramics student, Rachel Clark, was one of the chosen top five ceramic artists as a Niche Award Finalist.

Sponsored by NICHE magazine, the NICHE Awards program began in 1989 to celebrate excellence and innovation in American and Canadian fine craft. Artists are recognized in both professional and student divisions.

Nearly 2,000 entries are received each year from professional and student craft artists from across the U.S. and Canada. Each year, a prestigious panel of judges is selected by the editors of NICHE magazine, including gallery owners, guild and museum directors, curators, craft industry experts and arts advocates.

After the judging process is complete, and counts are tallied, the top-scoring pieces—5 in each category—become NICHE finalists. Out of these five, the highest-scoring piece in each category wins the NICHE award.

The NICHE Awards ceremony takes place each January during the American Made Show. The winners are revealed at the ceremony and each winning artist receives a trophy.

At the ceremony, student and professional winners take the stage side by side. Students benefit by meeting masters in their fields. Yet many attendees have noted that inspiration flows both ways. “The professionals inspire us with their technical mastery and their understanding of the role of craft in shaping culture,” says Hope Daniels, editorial director of NICHE magazine. “The students thrill us with their risk-taking vision of what craft is today and has yet to become tomorrow.”

Visiting Artist Noah Scalin To Speak On The Grey Area That Lies Between Innovation And Devastation

Noah Scalin’s work explores the theme of transience – specifically the temporary nature of our individual lives and tenuous nature of human existence on the planet. Rooted in the medieval concept of memento mori, a reflection on mortality meant to spur a greater reverence for life and reevaluation of priorities, Scalin’s work asks us to take notice of everyday moments.

The Taoist concept of balance – the idea that dark is required to understand light; that destruction is what makes creation valuable – is an ever-present theme in Scalin’s work. Images of death and violence are contrasted with objects and subjects that represent the greatest intellectual and technological achievements of humankind. Thus, Scalin underscores the grey area that lies between innovation and devastation.

By using everyday items, including mass produced consumer goods, in his photographs, installations, and sculptures, Scalin asks the viewer to recontextualize the ‘things’ in their lives that are normally taken for granted, overlooked or discarded. His work narrates the potential long-term impact of humans and their creations, giving the audience an opportunity to shift their ‘thing-ethos’ from linear (cradle-to-grave), to cyclical (cradle-to-cradle).

speaking TUESDAY, APRIL 11 at 5:00 PM in Speight Auditorium

This lecture is supported by the Visual Arts Forum.

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