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Giving baby the best possible start

Many children spend their time with video games and movies rather than a baseball or a jump rope, but maybe it’s possible to give children the health benefits of exercise before they are born.

Dr. Linda May has plans to show that if mothers commit to exercising during their pregnancies, there can be long term health benefits for their children.

Dr. May is an assistant professor of anatomy and physiology at the ECU School of Dental Medicine and an adjunct professor with the ECU College of Health and Human Performance and with the Obstetrics/Gynecology program at the ECU Brody School of Medicine. Her interest in heart health and exercise began at an early age. Her master’s work at the University of Florida was in exercise physiology.

During her master’s program, May learned that Dr. James Clapp, a well respected obstetrician at Case Western Reserve University, was studying the effects of exercise during pregnancy on maternal health. She contacted him with the idea of studying the influence of maternal exercise in pregnancy on child development before and after birth. He helped her get started.

“I jumped at the chance to have Dr. Clapp as a mentor and research partner,” said May, who completed her PhD in physiology at Kent State University.

Working with grant funds from the American Heart Association, May recruits expectant mothers for her research and provides each of them with an exercise plan to follow using facilities on ECU’s campus. Her team works with the mothers three times a week and records their heart measurements during and after their workouts.

Her collaborators in obstetrics and gynecology as well as pediatric cardiology help to record the babies’ heart and body measurements before and after birth.

“We are learning that, yes, generally the babies have improved heart measures, decreased heart rate, and increased variability, which is what most people achieve with a sustained exercise program. I was super excited to discover this when we first started,” said May, who is now in the fourth year of her study at ECU.

The mothers are welcomed back to May’s study after delivering their babies so she and her team can monitor what happens when babies are no longer exposed to mom’s exercise habits.

May and her team of exercise physiology students and interdisciplinary faculty repeat the measurement when the babies are one month, six months, and 12 months of age. The team is finding that in general the babies reflect the positive effects of their mother’s exercise regimen during pregnancy.

Dr. Linda May (at right) guides exercise classes for expectant mothers through the Enhanced Neonatal Health and Neonatal Cardiac Effect Developmentally (ENHANCED) program she heads at ECU.

Dr. Linda May (at right) guides exercise classes for expectant mothers through the Enhanced Neonatal Health and Neonatal Cardiac Effect Developmentally (ENHANCED) program she heads at ECU.

“This summer, our team tested two- and three-year-olds whose moms had been in our exercise program. We found that the toddlers had maintained the benefits of their mothers’ exercise. They also had below average body fat and above average motor skills, which is very intriguing,” she said.

Winterville, N.C., resident Amanda Dobbs is the mother of two boys, ages three and one. She joined May’s study soon after learning that she was pregnant with the second boy.

“I was quite overweight and inactive during my first pregnancy, and I had a very difficult delivery and a long recuperation,” Dobb’s said, “I knew I had to do things differently during my second pregnancy.”

As a participant in May’s study, Dobbs exercised three times a week beginning in her first trimester until just before her delivery. “The experience with my second son was completely different than with my first baby,” she said. “My labor, delivery, and recuperation were much shorter and easier. In fact, I walked my older son to the park the day after delivering our younger son.”

Dobbs credits the sustained exercise with the easier delivery and recovery. Her second baby remains in May’s study, and the effects of Amanda’s prenatal exercise on his health are still being assessed. Dobbs continues to be very health conscious—both for herself and for her family.

May’s study will follow children as they grow to 13 years of age. Measurements include heart health, fat development, cognitive health, and neuromotor health. She wants to see if the children will continue to be healthier regardless of their interests and level of activity.

May’s goals do not include creating a group of “super babies.” Her main concern is prevention and protection from future disease. As the mother of two boys herself, she was very active during her pregnancies in hopes of protecting her children from the heart disease that afflicts her husband’s side of the family.

“Kids can’t pick their parents, and they can’t pick their genes,” said May, “but we can give them the best start possible and point them in the direction of health. So far, our study seems to

indicate that regular exercise during pregnancy is beneficial for mom and baby and may possibly have long term effects.”

Exercise science students Kristen Harrison and Alex Babineau promoted the ENHANCED program at Latinofest in Greenville this fall.

Exercise science students Kristen Harrison and Alex Babineau promoted the ENHANCED program at Latinofest in Greenville this fall.

May wants her study to include pregnant moms of all possible ethnicities. She and her students recently attended Greenville’s Latino Festival and spread the news about the exercise program. “There are so many women out there who would benefit from the program, and it’s all free,” she said. “But we are in need of volunteer interpreters and those who can provide the moms with transportation to ECU.”

It is never too late to start a healthy lifestyle, and Dr. May is always looking for new mothers to join in her study, regardless of their exercise history. “I think every child should have the best chance possible, even before they are born,” she said.

Perhaps especially before they are born.

For more information on Dr. Linda May’s ENHANCED prenatal exercise program, visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/exercisefortwo/. Dr. May can be contacted at 252-737-7072 or mayl@ecu.ecu.

By Megan Downing and Peggy Novotny

Akeadra Bell receives scholarships

Akeadra Elantra Bell, second-year student at the ECU School of Dental Medicine, has been selected to receive scholarships from two national organizations to help cover her educational needs.

The Scholarship Committee of the National Dental Association Foundation selected Miss Bell to receive a $1,000 Predoctoral Dental Colgate-Palmolive Scholarship.

She has also been selected to receive a $1,000 scholarship from the Alpha Kappa Alpha Educational Advancement Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority.

Akeadra Bell, Class of 2020

Akeadra Bell, Class of 2020

Miss Bell, who is originally from Elizabeth City, N.C., is a graduate of Elizabeth City State University, where she majored in chemistry.

She serves as vice president of the ECU Chapter of the Student National Dental Association (SNDA) and as corporate roundtable representative for the SNDA at the national level.  She is treasurer of the Student Pediatric Dentistry Club, and she was recently elected pre-dental committee chair of the American Student Dental Association. She also serves as an academic tutor for other dental students.

The lack of dentists in Elizabeth City in the northeastern corner of the state impacted Miss Bell and her family during her formative years. The family experienced long car rides to either Greenville, N.C., or Chesapeake, VA, for dental appointments. But it was the long transformative experience of wearing braces that sparked her interest in the profession.

“It’s hard to describe my feeling when the braces came off and I saw my smile. At that moment, all those years of being a brace-face, wearing a retainer with a fake tooth on it, and all that travel was worth it,” she said. “My bright new smile, my relationship with my orthodontist, and being able to observe the art of dentistry sold me on becoming a dentist.”

Miss Bell’s long-term goal is to return to Elizabeth City and establish her own general dentistry practice. In the shorter term, however, she is working to complete a doctor of dental medicine (DMD) degree in 2020. “After dental school, I would like to complete a one-year residency program to gain further experience,” she said.

“Akeadra has brought her own unique dynamic combination of academic talent, leadership ability and passion for caring for the underserved to the ECU SoDM community. We look forward to her continued contributions as a student, a future alumna, and a member of the dental profession,” said Dr. Margaret Wilson, vice dean of the dental school.

As a second-year dental student, Miss Bell will soon begin treating patients under the supervision of dental faculty in Ledyard E. Ross Hall, the school’s teaching and clinical facility at ECU. During her fourth year, she and her classmates will complete rotations at the school’s community service learning centers in eight rural and underserved communities across North Carolina.

The ECU School of Dental Medicine Community Service Learning Center-Elizabeth City was opened in 2013. Miss Bell will have the opportunity to serve patients in her home community at that location during her final year of dental school.

PUBLIC SERVICE AWARD: Chadwick receives UNC system award for public service

Dr. Gregory Chadwick, dean of East Carolina University’s School of Dental Medicine, was awarded the 2017 Gov. James E. Holshouser Jr. Award for Excellence in Public Service on Friday, Nov. 3.

The UNC Board of Governors bestows the honor each year on one faculty member from the University of North Carolina system who exemplifies public service toward improving the quality of life for all North Carolinians.

For the full story, visit https://news.ecu.edu/2017/11/03/public-service-award/

Student Leslie Pence receives 2017 Dental Trade Alliance Foundation scholarship

Leslie Pence, third-year student at the ECU School of Dental Medicine, has been selected as a 2017 Dental Trade Alliance Foundation scholarship winner.

The Dental Trade Alliance Foundation is awarding $5,000 scholarships this year to rising third and fourth-year dental students who have demonstrated academic excellence in dentistry and have an established commitment to community service.

Leslie, who is originally from Cleveland, N.C., in Rowan County, graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2015 with a major in environmental studies with a concentration in health and the environment and a minor in Spanish for medical professions.

Third-year student Leslie Pence has received a 2017 Dental Trade Alliance Foundation scholarship. She is pictured with Dr. Greg Chadwick, dean of the ECU School of Dental Medicine, and Dr. Margaret Wilson, vice dean and associate dean for Student Affairs.

As an officer of the ECU Student Chapter of the Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, Leslie has assisted in coordinating several community service projects for children, including oral health screenings, oral hygiene instruction, and academic mentoring programs.

She and fellow dental students also travel distances to provide instruction in oral hygiene and nutrition for elementary school children in Green County, N.C.

“My passion for working with children is what drives my desire to pursue pediatric dentistry after graduation,” said Leslie. “I believe community service is an integral part of dentistry because it allows dentists to build relationships within their communities and better understand the specific needs of those they serve.”

Leslie’s goal is to become a pediatric dentist and mentor, advocate, and role model for children in an underserved area of North Carolina.

“We congratulate Leslie on receiving this award. Her selection recognizes her commitment to caring for underserved children and further promotes the mission of the ECU School of Dental Medicine,”said Dr. Margaret Wilson, vice dean of the dental school.

As a third-year dental student, Leslie serves dental patients under the supervision of dental faculty in Ledyard E. Ross Hall, the school’s teaching and clinical facility at ECU. During her fourth year, she and her classmates will complete rotations at the school’s community service learning centers in eight rural and underserved communities across North Carolina, a unique opportunity among dental schools.

According to its website, the Dental Trade Alliance (DTA) is an association of companies that provide dental equipment, supplies, materials and services to dentists and other oral care professionals. The purpose of the DTA Foundation is to broaden awareness of oral health’s impact on overall health and increase access to oral health care.

Dental Student Government officers assume their roles in 2017-2018

The ECU School of Dental Medicine’s Dental Student Government (DSG) officers have been selected for 2017-2018. The officers include Maria Isabel “Bel” Rego, president; Kiersten Bethea, vice president; Taylor Windley, secretary; Alexis Webb, treasurer; and Briana Hudson, community service chair.

The DSG represents the dental student body and acts as a guide in all academic and social matters. The role of the officers is to develop and implement projects that advance the School of Dental Medicine and the dental profession overall.

When asked what the DSG hopes to accomplish this year, President Bel Rego said, “We want to promote leadership, unity, and integrity while fostering an inclusive environment that values our students’ perspectives, stands by the well-being of all students, and provides an opportunity for all.”

ECU School of Dental Medicine Dental Student Government (DSG) officers for 2017-2018 are (seated left to right) Bel Rego, president; Kiersten Bethea, vice president; (standing left to right) Alexis Webb, treasurer; Taylor Windley, secretary; and Briana Hudson, community service chair.

ECU School of Dental Medicine Dental Student Government (DSG) officers for 2017-2018 are (seated left to right) Bel Rego, president; Kiersten Bethea, vice president; (standing left to right) Alexis Webb, treasurer; Taylor Windley, secretary; and Briana Hudson, community service chair.

Maria Isabel “Bel” Rego, president, is a third-year student from Winston Salem, N.C. She became DSG president after a successful year as DSG treasurer in 2016-2017. She is a graduate of Salem College and has worked with health equity and minority research for several years at Wake Forest University School of Medicine’s Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity. She earned a master’s degree in health education and promotion from ECU in 2014 and is a certified health education specialist (CHES) and a member of the North Carolina Society of Public Health Education.

Kiersten Bethea, vice president, is a third-year student from Greensboro, N.C. She graduated from North Carolina A&T State University in 2014 with a major in biology. Prior to dental school, she worked as a dental assistant in an oral surgery practice. In 2016-2017, she served as community service chair for both the DSG and the Student National Dental Association, and she has served on several committees at the dental school. As a North Carolina Albert Schweitzer Fellow, Kiersten is collaborating with an ECU Brody School of Medicine student in working with community providers to offer oral health care to the homeless.

Taylor Windley, secretary, is a second-year student from Zebulon, N.C. As secretary, she serves as the communication link between the DSG and the student body. She graduated with distinction from UNC-Chapel Hill in 2016, majoring in biology and minoring in chemistry and archaeology. She is chair of philanthropy for the school’s DMD student organization. She is especially interested in research in the area of pregnancy and infants; she is a member of the school’s Research Scholarship Committee. Upon graduation from dental school, Taylor hopes to become the third generation of dentists in her family to practice in North Carolina.

Alexis Webb, treasurer, is a second-year student from Durham, N.C. She is a graduate of Johnson C. Smith University, where she earned a chemistry degree and was a leader on and off the volleyball court and softball field, participarting in community service and mentoring programs. She earned a master’s in medical sciences from Hampton University. As DSG treasurer, Alexis guides student organizations in the appropriate handling and use of funds. Following graduation, she hopes to practice dentistry and engage in community outreach in an underserved area of North Carolina.

Briana Hudson, community service chair, is a second-year student from Greenville, N.C. She is a graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill, where she majored in exercise and sports science. She completed a post-baccalaureate degree in pre-health at UNC-Greensboro. She has held several leadership positions at the dental school, including community service chair for the Class of 2020 and for the American Dental Student Association. She has also served as event and networking coordinator for the Student National Dental Association. As DSG community service chair, she helps coordinate the school’s student outreach projects. Upon graduation from dental school, Briana hope to practice dentistry in a rural area of the state.

“We are delighted to have such an excellent group of Dental Student Government leaders as our officers this year. I know they will carry on the tradition of outstanding DSG leadership and build upon the achievements of their predecessors. At the School of Dental Medicine, we are educating dentists AND leaders,” said Dr. Margaret Wilson, the school’s vice dean and associate dean for student affairs.

Acela Martinez Luna, DMD, MS receives Straumann Scholarship for New Periodontists

Acela Martinez Luna, DMD, MS, clinical assistant professor of periodontology at the ECU School of Dental Medicine Department of Surgical Sciences, has been awarded a 2017 Straumann Scholarship for New Periodontists.

Through the generous support of Straumann, the American Academy of Periodontology competitively awarded 17 scholarships to new U.S. and Canadian periodontists. Dr. Martinez Luna received the scholarship award at the recent American Academy of Periodontology Annual Meeting in Boston at the student/new periodontist session titled, “Pearls and Pitfalls: What I Wish I had Known After Residency.”

Acela Martinez Luna, DMD, MS

Acela Martinez Luna, DMD, MS

The scholarship includes a stipend to be used towards Annual Meeting expenses. Dr. Martinez Luna will also be recognized in the December 2017 issue of Periospectives, the magazine of the American Academy of Periodontology.

Dr. Martinez Luna joined the surgical sciences faculty in July 2017. She grew up in Mexico City in a family of dentists. Her mother is a practicing periodontist, and her father is a general dentist. She earned a doctor of dental medicine degree from Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi in Mexico in 2009. Thereafter, she completed certificate training in restorative dentistry at Centro de Estudios Odontologicos de Queretaro in 2011.

Following in the footsteps of her mother, Dr. Martinez Luna pursued specialty training and completed the advanced education program in periodontology at the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Dentistry (periodontics certificate and master’s degree in 2015). As a postdoctoral student and resident, she investigated the osteogenic activity associated with dental implant placement in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus under the mentorship of Dr. Stephen Offenbacher, UNC-Chapel Hill W.R. Kenan, Jr. Distinguished Professor.

Following her specialty training, Dr. Martinez Luna embarked on a one-year fellowship in advanced implant dentistry focused on complex implant treatment planning, bone augmentation, three dimensional imaging and printing uses (e.g., stent fabrication, guided surgery, prosthesis fabrication and delivery), and implant prosthodontics.

Dr. Martinez Luna is also the recipient of a Straumann S.U.P.E.R. Grant (2015), the North Carolina American Association of Dental Research Section Derek T. Turner Student Research Award (2015), and the UNC-Chapel Hill Elsie and Baxter Sapp Fellowship Award (2014).

Prior to joining ECU, Dr. Martinez Luna practiced periodontics and implant dentistry in the city of Queretaro, Mexico. She is a diplomate with the American Board of Periodontology.

According to its website, Straumann is a “global leader in implant, restorative and regenerative dentistry.” Learn more at http://www.straumann.com/.

Research event highlights pulpal regeneration and showcases student work

 Is it possible that root canals could soon become a thing of the past? It’s quite likely according to Kenneth Hargreaves, DDS, PhD, professor and chair of the Department of Endodontics, UT Health, San Antonio, Texas.
Dr. Kenneth Hargreaves, DDS, PhD

Dr. Kenneth Hargreaves, DDS, PhD

Dr. Hargreaves’ presentation “Regeneration Endodontics: From Stem Cells to Biologically Based Endodontic Procedures” resonated with faculty, residents, students, and staff attending the School of Dental Medicine’s annual Celebration of Research and Scholarship on August 23.

Hargreaves, a longtime endodontist and researcher, explained the steps involved in contemporary regenerative endodontic procedures designed to replace damaged tooth structures and promote healing within the tooth.

“Although much remains to be done to advance this field, progress has been made in clinical regenerative endodontic procedures, literally saving teeth by regenerating a functional pulp-dentin complex,” Hargreaves said.

Hargreaves, who also maintains a private endodontics practice, has received numerous national awards for his research and has published more than 160 articles, two textbooks, and serves as editor of the Journal of Endodontics.

Dr. Jay Golden, ECU vice chancellor for research, economic development and engagement; Dr. Greg Chadwick, dean of the School of Dental Medicine; and Dr. Sharon Gordon, the school’s associate dean for research, welcomed the faculty, staff, residents, and students seated in Ross Hall as well as those at Community Service Learning Centers across the state via teleconference.

Dr. Golden outlined ECU’s plans to double its research expenditures over the next five years. He said interdisciplinary research will be at the forefront. The university will form eight core research clusters bringing faculty and students together from across the campus. Researchers must work together “to provide the next generation of strategies to reduce chronic disease,” said Golden.

The annual celebration calls attention to the school’s research agenda and gives predoctoral students and their faculty mentors a forum for showcasing research with the potential to improve oral health.

Following the keynote address, Dr. V. Wallace McCarlie, clinical assistant professor in the Division of Orthodontics and advisor to the school’s Student Research Group recognized the winners of the day’s poster competition. Winners were selected by a panel of faculty and will represent the school at national conferences over the next year.

Luke Current

Luke Current

Third-year student Luke Current received the American Dental Association/Dentsply Sirona Clinical Research Program Award. Luke will be competing at the dental student research competition known as “SCADA” at the upcoming American Association of Dental Research (AADR) meeting in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, in 2018.

Third-year student Matthew Moore presented “Childhood Dental Caries Assessment: A Cross Sectional Study Comparing dmft Index of Fluoridated and Non-Fluoridated Counties in North Carolina.” Matthew will participate in the Hinman Student Research Symposium, a student-focused national meeting featuring presentations by students and graduate trainees from dental schools across North America.

Matthew Moore

Matthew Moore

First-year student Kayla Locklear presented “Geofencing: Mobile Technology as a Health Promotion Tool to Raise Awareness of a Dental Clinic in Rural North Carolina.” She will participate in the American Association of Dental Research (AADR) meeting in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.

First-year student James Parker, Jr. presented “Antifungal Effect of Capric Acid Against Candida Albicans in Vitro.” James will compete at the SCADA competition during the American Dental Association Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., in 2019.

First-year student Bryan Yang presented “Antimicrobial Activity of Honokiol Against Periodontal Pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An In Vitro Study.” He will participate in the American Dental Association Foundation Colgate Dental Students’ Conference on Research sponsored by the American Dental Association in Gaithersburg, Maryland.

First-year student Tashana Detwiler presented “Prevalence of Elevated Blood Pressure Among Emergency Adult Dental Patients Presenting to an Emergency Dental Clinic.” She will participate in the American Association of Dental Research (AADR) meeting in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.First year students (left to right) Kayla Locklear; James Parker, Jr.; Bryan Yang; and Tashana Detwiler will represent the school at national conferences.

Posters presentations at the Celebration of Research and Scholarship included the following:

Developing a Pre-Clinical Mouse Model of HPV-driven Oral Cancer
A.L. Amelio, M.B. Carper, S. Troutman, K.M. Byrd, E.C. Henry, S.A. Montgomery, S. E. Williams, J. Kissil

The Detrimental Manifestations Surrounding Betel Quid Use:  A Narrative Review
Bryant, E. Qureshi, K. Weiss, A. Hasan

Effects of Expanding the Implementation of the Prenatal Oral Health Program
Davis, L. Karan, G. Crain, K. Gise, S. Smith, R. Spain

Prevalence of Elevated Blood Pressure Among Emergency Adult Dental Patients Presenting to an Emergency Dental Clinic
Detwiler, K. Gise

Risk Factors for Dental Outpatient Anesthesia and Sedation Procedures Derived from Deaths Reported in the Public Domain
R.A. Dionne

Antifungal Properties of Berberine Chloride on Various Species of Candida in vitro
Hasan, J.R. Parker, B. Yang, J. Cope Meyers, L. Ferreira, M. Murata

Geofencing:  Mobile Technology as a Health Promotion Tool to Raise Awareness of a Dental Clinic in Rural North Carolina
B.K. Locklear, A.  Rafferty, M. Tucker-McLaughlin, Winterbauer, W. Wright

Oral Health Literacy Correlated with Oral Health Status in Eastern North Carolina
V.W. McCarlie, S.V. Dave, C. Kennedy, L. Karan, V. Nguyen, E.C. Mehaffey, M.I. Baltar Rego, G.J. Eckert*, K.T. Stewart*

Antifungal Effect of Capric Acid Against Candida Albicans in vitro
J.R. Parker Jr., D. Hasan, L.E.N. Ferreira, J. Cope Meyers, R.M. Murata

Childhood Dental Caries Assessment: A Cross Sectional Study Comparing dmft Index of Fluoridated and Non-Fluoridated Counties in NC
M.I. Rego, A.C. Green, M.R. Moore, P.M. Kriska, E.B.W. Maltba, G. A. Camargo I. Hasan, R. Murata,

Matrix and Cell-Based Study of the Effect of Dietary Fruit Extracts on Bone Healing In Vivo
A.G. Robinson, J.M. Souza, Jr, S.A. Tuin, J.G.O. de Souza, M.A. Bianchini, P.A. Miquez

Antimicrobial Activity of Honokiol Against Periodontal Pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An In Vitro Study

New Video Assists Patients

Need a dentist? This new Patient Welcome Video is a quick overview of the oral health services offered by our school in Greenville. Our eight Community Service Learning Centers across North Carolina also offer a full range of services. Learn more about our services by watching this video.

Brianna Chavis-Locklear ’20 receives the Society of American Indian Dentists Proctor and Gamble Scholarship

Brianna Chavis-Locklear, a second-year student at the ECU School of Dental Medicine, has received a scholarship from the Society of American Indian Dentists sponsored by Proctor and Gamble.

Ms. Chavis-Locklear, who is originally from Pembroke, N.C., is a student member of the Society of American Indian Dentists and a member of the Lumbee Tribe. She earned a bachelor of science degree in psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

“The scholarship application included an essay section describing how receiving this scholarship would allow me to enhance and advance the dental health of American Indian people,” said Chavis-Locklear. “My main goal is to bring positive change through oral health care to the lives of other American Indians as well as other underserved North Carolinians.”

Brianna Chavis-Locklear ‘20 received a 2017 Society of American Indian Dentists Proctor and Gamble Scholarship. Dean Greg Chadwick and Vice Dean Maggie Wilson presented the scholarship to Brianna.

She also hopes to serve as a role model for American Indians who are considering pursuing dentistry and serving the oral health needs of the underserved, especially American Indians.

Dr. Margaret Wilson, the dental school’s vice dean and associate dean for student affairs, stated, “We are particularly proud of students like Brianna, who plan to use their skills as dentists to meet oral health needs within their own communities. Through such dedication, our graduates fulfill the mission of the ECU School of Dental Medicine.”

Chavis-Locklear serves as class representative to the ECU Student Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. As an undergraduate at UNC-Chapel, she was banquet co-chair for the Carolina Indian Circle; minority advisor for the minority advising program; and service coordinator for the Undergraduate Student National Dental Association.

She attended the 2017 Society of American Indian Dentists (SAID) Conference in Cincinnati, Ohio, in June and was recognized among dental students from across the country who received SAID scholarships.

During her fourth-year of dental school, she and her classmates will gain hands-on clinical experience treating patients during rotations at the school’s community service learning centers in eight rural and underserved communities across North Carolina, including a center in Robeson County near Pembroke.

The Society of American Indian Dentists (SAID) is a national, non-profit organization comprised of oral health professionals and students dedicated to promoting and improving the oral health of the American Indian/Alaskan Native community and providing advocacy for the American Indian/Alaskan Native dental professionals across the US, according to the organization’s website.

 

Dr. Carol F. Anderson is named 2017 Woman of the Year by the National Association of University Women (NAUW) Elizabeth City Branch.

Dr. Carol F. Anderson, faculty director of the ECU School of Dental Medicine Community Service Learning Center-Elizabeth City, was honored recently with the title 2017 Woman of the Year at a banquet hosted by the National Association of University Women (NAUW) Elizabeth City Branch.

Dr. Anderson directs ECU’s dental center in Elizabeth City, N.C., where fourth-year students and residents gain experience caring for patients at reduced fees. The center, which opened in 2013, is one of ECU’s eight centers across the state addressing the shortage of dentists in rural and underserved regions.

“I was delighted to be nominated for the award,” said Dr. Anderson, “especially when I learned that the person who nominated me was one of our patients as well as a member of the National Association of University Women Elizabeth City Branch.”

Dr. Carol F. Anderson was named 2017 Woman of the Year by the National Association of University Women (NAUW) Elizabeth City Branch.

Dr. Anderson received her DDS degree from University of Maryland and holds a master of science in health science administration from Towson University. She completed a certificate in health care administration from ECU in June 2017. Prior to moving to Elizabeth City and joining ECU, she served as a faculty member at the University of Maryland Dental School in Baltimore, Maryland.

Her interest in dentistry began when a family friend of her parents “let” her work as his dental assistant. As she watched the dentist work she decided, “I can do that!” After dental school, she spent several years in private practice before entering dental education; first, overseeing daily operation of a student clinic and ultimately as the director of a satellite clinic.

Dr. Anderson split her time as faculty member treating HIV+ patients and providing clinical instruction to students working and treating patients with special needs.

She is also a former Harry O. Bruce Legislative Scholar with the American Dental Education Association. As a Bruce Scholar, her focus was researching and lobbying for dental education and continued funding for the Ryan White Care Act.

She believes that a healthy oral environment contributes to a person’s overall health and that prevention is key to achieving health.

Dr. Anderson is originally from Washington, D.C., but spent most of her formative years in suburban Maryland. She is married and has two grown children.

The NAUW banquet also honored Dr. Kiera Gilliam, an Elizabeth City pharmacist; Mrs. Wendy James, a registered nurse at the EC Veterans Center in Elizabeth City; Ms. Pamela Spruill, a registered nurse at Edenton Public Schools; and Mrs. Dianne Winslow, a member of the NAUW Elizabeth City Branch.

The National Association of University Women nationally dates back to 1910. The organization seeks to serve women, youth, and disadvantaged persons in the community and in developing countries by addressing educational issues, advancing the status of women’s issues, and strategically partnering with allied organizations.

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