ECTC News

Source: University Archives, SL2650/1/1

ECTC News

ECTC News

Staff Person: Suellyn Lathrop

Description:
ECTC News was the first student newspaper at East Carolina. It started as a two page stenciled newsletter issued twice a month beginning October 23, 1923, became a broadside printed on newsprint and ended as a multi-page newspaper on June 1, 1925. It was replaced in the fall by the Teco Echo a true college newspaper.

The main purpose of ECTC News was to keep the alumnae up to date on the happenings on campus and with each other. The first issue expressly focused on the changes and expansion in departments, buildings and faculty. Afterwards each issue contains updates on alumni, faculty, students and college activities.

Perhaps most interesting today is that the paper tells us about college activities pre-television. Recurring themes are YWCA and church activities, NC Education Association meetings, recitals, luncheons, practice teaching and the activities of the literary societies. Several times movies are mentioned. In February 1925 a special showing of Snow White was set up for the children from the Model School. While it may have been a simpler time, the faculty and students certainly maintained busy schedules.

The extant issues of ECTC News have been scanned and are available on-line at:

They are also available on microfilm in both the North Carolina Collection and in Special Collections. Due to the poor condition of the papers the originals are not pulled for patrons.

Click on the image itself to see an enlarged version.

When Johnny Came Marching Home Again

Source: Timothy Hunter Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #748

Pass that allowed C.B. Keeling to travel home after the Civil War

Pass that allowed C.B. Keeling to travel home after the Civil War

Staff Person: Jean Hiebert

Description:
Timothy Hunter was a shipbuilder in Elizabeth City, North Carolina from 1835 until the advent of the Civil War. We are fortunate to have his personal papers which were donated to Joyner by his great-great-great granddaughter, Mrs. Joanne Foreman. The finding aid for his papers is at: Manuscript Collection 748.

Tucked deep into these papers is the pass that allowed a young soldier, C.B. Keeling, to travel home after the war ended. Hunter and Keeling knew each other because Keeling served several times as a seaman on the schooner San Juan that Hunter built in 1858. Hunter hired him as one of the six crew who routinely manned the schooner. The ship’s manifest from 1860 lists Keeling as a 22 year-old who stood 5’8″ tall and earned $16 a month. As was typical of the time, he had a second career as well. He was listed as a printer when he joined the Confederate army on May 4, 1861.

A little background . . .
By July of 1861, the Union had begun a blockade of southern ports. In many cases, blockade runners like the San Juan were the only ships small enough and fast enough to slip through the blockade. It was a dangerous business and even the fastest ships sometimes got caught. On September 28, 1861, the U.S.S. Susquehanna intercepted the San Juan on her way back from the West Indies where she had been loaded with sugar, salt, and gin. Both the cargo (worth $4000) and the ship (worth $4500) were seized by the Union navy, but it is unclear what punishment was dealt the crew.

Nearly five months later, Keeling turned up as a private in Company L of the 17th Regiment that was assembled on Roanoke Island. The strategy of the great Burnside Expedition was to overtake each island fort on the way to Richmond where Union forces would then have easy access to the railway linking Richmond with New Orleans. Brigadier-General D.H. Hill felt that this was such a crucial battle that the fall of Roanoke Island would be as “fully fatal as that of Manassas.” Ships were sunk in the inlet as impediments to the advance of the Union fleet. Regiments from North Carolina and Georgia manned the few cannon available on the island and the famous Mosquito fleet attempted to repel the Union advance. None of it worked and Roanoke Island fell on February 15, 1862. General Burnside took the whole encampment as prisoners.

Why the pass is important . . .
Keeling was exchanged in August 1862 and was present or accounted for until March of 1863 when the regiment was disbanded. He likely joined another unit and was recaptured. The date on the pass is April, 1865 — the fifth and final April of the war. The pass allowed Keeling to travel from Richmond to Norfolk. The Dismal Swamp Canal spanned the distance between Norfolk and Keeling’s home in Elizabeth City and would have been a familiar route to him. Before beginning the trip home, Keeling was required to sign an oath of parole that granted him permission to return to Pasquotank County. It was an agreement of honor that he would not participate in hostile acts against the United States until he was properly exchanged.

The creases still show on this small square of paper where it had been folded into quarters. I have held it in my hands many times in the hopes that somehow it could impart just a little more information on the man Timothy Hunter had been. It was a long time before I stopped to consider that the real story it tells is that of a man who was 27 years old when the war ended; a man who was most likely tired, hungry, dispirited, and afraid of how he was going to survive now that everything he knew had been changed forever. This simple square of paper was all the permission he had in the world to even try his luck at surviving. How many hands had held it? How many pairs of eyes had surveyed it with suspicion, then reluctant assent? How many times had Keeling folded it back up, returned it to his pocket, and let go of the breath he had held in fear?

I don’t know if Keeling ever went back to Elizabeth City or if he married and had a family. There is no further record of him in the Hunter papers. At the oddest times, he will enter my thoughts and I can’t help but wonder what ever became of him. In the few moments that I have held his pass, I’ve had an eerie sense that I was holding a man’s life in my hands.

I hope that it was finally a peaceful life.

Hardee’s Restaurant

Source: Daily Reflector Negative Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #741

Staff Person: Dale Sauter

Description:
The image below documents the very first Hardee’s restaurant founded by Wilber Hardee. This photograph was taken in September 1960 for use in a Daily Reflector print advertisement to promote the grand opening of the restaurant. Contrary to popular belief, the first Hardee’s was not in Rocky Mount, but right down the road at 14th and Charles Streets. Part of the confusion exists because the first franchised version of the restaurant was in Rocky Mount. As the story goes, two businessmen from Rocky Mount partnered with Hardee but eventually gained control of the franchise.

Unfortunately, the original building no longer stands. Mr. Hardee has published a quite interesting account of his life (mostly spent in the local area) entitled The Life and Times of Wilber Hardee: Founder of Hardee’s. It is currently available in the NC Collection (TX910.5.H32 A4 2000).

A finding aid for the Daily Reflector Negative Collection, 1949-1967 is available at Manuscript Collection #741

We are currently working on a more detailed finding aid for this important collection that documents everyday life in the Greenville area. Please contact us with any questions or comments you may have.

Hardee's restaurant

Hardee's restaurant

CSS Neuse

Source: William H. Rowland Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #876

CSS Neuse

CSS Neuse

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

This photograph is from Collection #876/12 William H. Rowland Papers (1861-1971). The Hull remnant was of the Confederate ironclad gunboat CSS NEUSE. It was set on fire by Confederate troops to prevent being captured in March of 1865. It was found in the Neuse River and raised after many problems due to lack of funds and ownership controversies. This is one of many 4×5 negatives taken during the archaeology dig in which they recovered 15,000 artifacts. I think this is a truly amazing collection. There is a finding aid online for this collection and you can click this link to get to it: Manuscript Collection 876.

Tobacco Harvest

Source: Daily Reflector Negative Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #741

Tobacco Harvest

Tobacco Harvest

Staff Person: Coleen Allen

Description:
The images below are of tobacco being harvested in the 1950s. The inscription shown on these photos is August 20, 1954. These pictures are after tobacco has been pulled from the stalks (primed) in the fields. From the tobacco trucks brought from fields, laborers hand tobacco to be tied (looped) onto sticks. As pictured, these filled sticks are then hung in a barn especially for curing the tobacco. It might be of interest to compare this with the current day method of harvesting the crop using bulk barns. Should you have an interest in seeing these actual photos, ask to see THE DAILY REFLECTOR NEGATIVE COLLECTION, Collection 741, Photos #36 and 37 (found in Folder A of the Proof Sheet Box). The finding aid is available at Manuscript Collection 741. We encourage you to use the vast holdings available in Special Collections.

Tobacco drying

Tobacco drying

Civil War Special Orders

Source: Thomas Sparrow Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #1

Confederate States of America special order for Major Thomas Sparrow, June 7, 1864

Confederate States of America special order for Major Thomas Sparrow, June 7, 1864

Staff Person: Brian Johnson

Description:
The first image below is a Special Order from General Pierre G.T. Beauregard dated June 7th, 1864 relieving Major Thomas Sparrow of his command of the 10th North Carolina troops and reassigning him to the command of the companies at Plymouth, NC. The second image is a Special Order dated October 13th, 1864 granting a ten day leave of absence to Major Sparrow due to illness.

Thomas Sparrow (1819-1884) was a Washington, NC lawyer until the outbreak of the Civil War. He was commissioned a captain in the Confederate Army in 1861 and served at Fort Hatteras, commanding the Washington Grays until he was taken prisoner by Union forces in August of that year. He was later paroled from a Union prison in February, 1862. After the war he returned to Washington and represented Beaufort County in the North Carolina General Assembly in 1870 and 1881.

These documents and others from the Thomas Sparrow Collection (# 1.1) and can be viewed in the Special Collections department. The finding aid is available at Manuscript Collection 1

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.

Confederate States of America special order for Major Thomas Sparrow, June 7, 1864

Confederate States of America special order for Major Thomas Sparrow, June 7, 1864

Parker Store, Menola, NC – 1

Source: Murfreesboro Historical Association Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #691

The Parker Store at Menola, North Carolina

The Parker Store at Menola, North Carolina

Staff Person: Anna Hardee

Description:
The Parker Store at Menola, NC in Hertford, County Collection #691/6 Murfreesboro Historical Association Collection

How many of the below items can you identify?
There is the old Coffee grinder, and an old washing machine.
The wooden boxes on the shelves contained many things such as leather for the soles of shoes, rice and one box in particular contained Small arms ammunition loaded shot shells.
If you look at the left of the photo where the woven baskets are, on the third shelf down there are old bottles of medicinal supplies. Most of the items in this photo are rarely ever seen anymore.
There are numerous photos along this line in this collection, along with old buildings and landmarks.
I hope you enjoy this week’s staff pick.
If you would like, please come up and check out our vast collection of various materials.

Manuscript Collection 691.003

Click on the image itself to see an enlarged version.

Omai

Source: A Voyage Towards the South Pole, Joyner Rare G420/C66/1777

Omai

Omai

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:

The image above is of Omai (ca.1751-ca 1779)

Omai (ca.1751-ca. 1779) was the first Polynesian brought back to England by Captain James Cook (1726-1779) following his 1772-1775 around the world voyage. It was thought by English followers of the Enlightenment that individuals like Omai lived in a “natural state” of the “noble savage.” This idea was first expressed by Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1788) in his work The Discourse on Inequality, (1754) in which he argued that civilization had destroyed man’s “natural goodness” and that this was the basis of social inequality. Rousseau noted in his Social Contract (1762), that “Man is born free and is everywhere in chains.” Rousseau’s Enlightenment thinking formed the basis for many tenants that were later expressed in the American Declaration of Independence (1776).

Omai was not the first nor the last person brought by the English back to the Old World. Indians from North Carolina as well as Eskimo families were transported eastward during the 16th through 18th centuries. Omai lived in England from July of 1774 until his return to Raiatea in August of 1777. In England under the guardianship of the Earl of Sandwich (he was from the “Sandwich Islands”), Omai went to balls, operas and the opening of Parliament. He also enjoyed attending parties of shooting, skating, picnicking, and great formal dinners. Several portraits of Omai were made including a famous one by Sir Joshua Reynolds (1712-1792) which was recently on the market for 12.5 million pounds Sterling. Omai was noted by Fanny Burney (1752-1840) to be “a perfectly rational and intelligent man, with an understanding far superior to the common race of us cultivated gentry.” Omai was the author of a number of epistles and poems and he appeared frequently on the London stage as a dramatic character telling the story of his experiences in England and native land. Among his more notable works are Omiah’s farewell to the ladies of London, (1776):

    To beauteous B******, and the courteous C******
    His warmest, chastest, fairest thanks are due;
    Be yours gay days of ease, and nights of pleasure,
    And joys Elysian, flowing without measure.

Omai returned to Polynesia with Cook’s second expedition in 1776/7, where Cook helped Omai build a house on Raiatea. Cook was killed later on in his expedition by the natives and in 1783 when Vice Admiral Sir William Bligh (1754-1817) arrived in Tahiti on the Bounty, he was told that Omai had also died a “few years after Cook had departed.”

The image is from:

Cook, James, 1728-1779 A voyage towards the South Pole, and round the world. Performed in His Majesty’s ships the Resolution and Adventure, in the years, 1772, 1773, 1774 and 1775. London: Printed for W. Strahan & T. Cadell, 1777. 2 v. plates (part folded) ports, (incl. front.) maps (part folded) folded plan. 31 cm.

While there is no special finding aid for this item which is in the Rare Book collection, the item is cataloged in our online catalog under:

Joyner Rare G420 C66 1777

Kinston High School’s Little Mothers League for Better Babies

Source: Fred & Susan Brock Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #869

Kinston High School's Little Mothers League for Better Babies

Kinston High School's Little Mothers League for Better Babies

Staff Person: Jon Dembo

Description:
The image below is a reproduction of Kinston High School’s Little Mothers League for Better Babies’ group portrait (ca. 1920). It was apparently made from Sadie Stadiem’s copy of the original photograph. The name of the photographer, E. D. Sparrow, of Kinston, NC, appears in the lower right corner of the print.

On the back of the original photographic print is written the admonition: “Lest I forget” and the names of the girls and their unidentified nurse. Reading from left to right, they are:

     Amie Jordan Parham
    Betty Diamond
    Violet Mausfield
    Marjorie Hunter
    Dorothy Suggs
    Grace Wooten
    Ruby Taylor
    Carrie Mae Dunn
    Louise Tull
    Eleanor Edwards
    Mary Emma Bizzel
    Sadie Stadiem
    Louise Bland
    Gladys Worthington
    Ruby Mewbern
    Edna Tilman (Nurse)

The photograph was a gift of Fred and Susan Block, of Wilmington, NC, 4 February 2002 (Mss #869.1.a). You may access the finding aid to the Fred and Susan Block Collection at: Manuscript Collection 869.

If anyone can identify the nurse, standing at right, please contact the Special Collections Department at (252) 328-6671.

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.

Mary Marcia Blount Rodman

Source: Williiam Blount Rodman Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #329

Mary Marcia Blount Rodman

Mary Marcia Blount Rodman

Staff Person: Martha Elmore

Description:
The image below is of Mary Marcia Blount Rodman (January 12, 1819-1911), the daughter of William Wanton Rodman and his wife Polly Ann Blount Rodman of Washington, North Carolina. The inscription on the back of the photograph says that she “enjoyed trips to Ocracoke until after her 90th year.” This photograph is so intriguing because she is dressed up in a nice black satin dress and bonnet while holding the fish she had caught. Another point of interest is that the photographer is Bayard Wootten (1875-1959) of New Bern, North Carolina., who was a pioneering woman photographer in the early decades of the 20th century. This image can be found in the William Blount Rodman Papers and the finding aid is available at Manuscript Collection #329. If you are interested in seeing this photograph in person, please tell a Special Collections staff person that you would like to see the photograph numbered p-329/60 which is located in box #329.168.c.

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