J. H. Rose on Telephone

Source: Daily Reflector Negative Collection 741.25.a.36

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description: J. H. Rose, Civil Defense Manager for Pitt County, talks on telephone during Hurricane Donna in September of 1960. Hurricane Donna touched every state on the East Coast from Florida to Maine. In North Carolina there were eight deaths and 100 injured with property damage over five million dollars.

Catfantastic

Source: Schlobin PS648 F3 C38 1991

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description: Cats are ethereal creatures that span time and space. They are highly prized members of the science fiction and fantasy community. Often purring away in our homes and spaces, they are lords and ladies of all they reign. We don’t pick our feline friends but instead they chose us, and having made their choice we can travel with them to distance lands and worlds in space. Catfantastic is a collection of short cat stories collected by Andrew Norton and Martin Greenberg. So join them in these stories as they save damsels in distress, conduct “bioengineered” cat diplomatic missions, ward off dangers to humans, and save a major public dam project from destruction. It’s a bird, it’s a plane, its….SUPERCAT.

Chart of Beaufort Harbor, 1857

Source: North Carolina Map Collection, NCC Maps G3902 B42 P5 1857 U67

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description: This chart was part of a large survey done by the Hydrographic Office of the U.S. Navy just prior to the Civil War. The survey was conducted by Alexander Dallas Bache (1806-1867) Superintendent, and under the local supervision of John Newland Maffitt (1819-1886). Using these charts Maffitt, later in the Confederate Navy, was known as the “Prince of the Privateers” for his extraordinary success as a blockade runner and commerce raider. Maffitt also commanded the CSS Albemarle which dominated the Roanoke River for a time during the war. Of special interest on this chart is Carolina City, NC which was a rival to a development to the east by John Motley Moreland called Shepard’s Point. Both developments were merged into Morehead City. For more information on Carolina City please visit: http://friendsoffortmacon.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/The-Lost-Carolina-City.pdf