Auditor’s Statement, A.C. Monk & Company, July 13, 1920

Source:    A.C. Monk & Company/A.C. Monk Family Collection, 1907-2004  ECMC # 1285

Staff Person: Fred Harrison

Description: Originating just prior to WWI under the name Monk Adams Company, Wilson, N.C, A.C. Monk & Company officially began business in Farmville, N.C. on May 10, 1922.

The company’s records recently donated to the East Carolina Manuscript Collection attest to a continuous period of impressive growth.  The firm soon became one of the  nation’s leading dealers in leaf-tobacco.

According to Albert Monk III, grandson of A.C. Monk, the company’s initial wealth relied heavily on  diverse business interests: namely, farmland, a furniture store and funeral home. In the late 1980s; however, it was decided that in order to grow, the company had to get bigger.

As such, on July 13, 1990, the business merged with a competitor to form Monk-Austin Inc. Another merger later that decade resulted in the creation of DIMON Inc. which emerged to become the second largest leaf-tobacco merchant in the world. Monk family members retained some  indirect ownership in this entity until its eventual acquisition by Alliance One in the early 2000s.

On view here is an auditor’s statement from July 13, 1920, one of a nearly intact collection of business papers spanning from approximately 1916 to the early 2010s. Company founder, A.C. Monk, Sr. died on June 6, 1948.  Sons, Albert C., Robert Turnage and William C.  succeeded him.

Affidavit of John A. Richardson in the Trial of Thomas Brady, March 4, 1872

Source: Henry Berry Lowrie Papers, 1864-1872 Manuscript Collection #1271

Staff Person: Fred Harrison

Description: Solicitor  John A. Richardson motions to have Thomas Brady’s trial moved out of Robeson County, N.C. owing to strong feeling among the citizens there that Brady’s murder of Stephen Locklier was “considered to have been a good deed.” Brady was connected to a band of outlaws known as the Lowrie (also spelled Lowry) Gang who resisted the Confederate Home Guard in the area of Robeson County during the Civil War as well as their successors in the period running through the early 1870s.

An interesting period account of the Lowrie Gang is available in George Alfred Townsend’s The Swamp Outlaws: or, The North Carolina Bandits : Being a Complete History of the Modern Rob Roys and Robin Hoods (1872). The Langford North Carolina Collection has a recent reprint available for use among its reference holdings under the call number NoCar Ref F262.R6 S93 2015.

Also noteworthy and available for free electronic access through East Carolina University Digital Collections is The Lowrie History: As Acted in Part by Henry Berry Lowrie, The Great North Carolina Bandit, with Biographical Sketch of His Associates (Lumberton, N.C.: Lumbee Pub. Co., c1909) at https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/17019 .