Alumni Day 1968

Source:  University Archives Image Collection (UA55-01-9775)

Staff Person:  Arthur Carlson

Description:  This image from the University Archives features the layout of J.Y. Joyner Library on Alumni Day in 1968.  Joyner Library was dedicated on March 8, 1955 as part of that year’s Founder’s Day celebrations.  The growing student body forced campus administrators to add air conditioning and two additional floors in 1964. From 1994-1999, a third major renovation added the rounded tower and Sonic Plaza which make Joyner among the most recognizable buildings on campus.  Its namesake, James Yadkin Joyner, was a career educator and served as state Superintendent of Public Instruction from 1902-1919.  He was instrumental in the modernization of the North Carolina public school system.

USS Sarda (SS488)

Source: USS Sarda entering Havana, Cuba  Call Number: 818.os1.1

Staff Person: Ken Harbit

Description:

USS Sarda (SS-488), was a Tench-class submarine.  Financed by bonds purchased by the residents of Lynn, Massachusetts, her keel was laid down on 12 April 1945 at the Portsmouth Navy Yard. She was launched on 24 August 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Heffernan, the wife of James J. Heffernan, Congressman from New York.

Because World War II had ended a few weeks before the submarine’s launch, a new decision whether to commission or scrap her had to be made. Sarda’s prospective commanding officer grew frustrated with the debate over the fate of his boat. During the months of waiting, he received a small plaque from his father inscribed Illegitimi non Carborundum — “Don’t Let the Bastards Grind You Up.” After a a hard won fight by her prospective commanding officer, Sarda was commissioned on 19 April 1946 with Commander Chester W. Nimitz, Jr., son of the famous Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, in command.

During the period between launching and commissioning, Sarda, was no longer needed for wartime service. Because of this, her conning tower was made bigger to permit installation of experimental equipment. After commissioning, she conducted her shakedown cruise in the Caribbean Sea, then returned north to commence experimental work out of New London, Connecticut. There, she joined Submarine Division (SubDiv) 22 of Submarine Squadron 2; and, for the next four years, she tested new equipment for the Underwater Sound Laboratory, Fort Trumbull, and evaluated new ship control procedures. In the fall of 1949, she was transferred to SubDiv 21, and her primary mission was shifted from test and evaluation work to training ship duties. She continued that work through the 1950s, interrupting it only for type training; mine planting exercises; ASW exercises; fleet exercises; occasional participation in NATO or joint United States-Canadian exercises off the coasts of the Atlantic Provinces and northern New England; and, from January to June 1957, operations in the Caribbean Sea and the Guiana and Brazilian basins for the Hydrographic Office. On her return, she resumed her primary function, training submarine school students.

In the early 1960s, she continued her training mission, but devoted more time to providing services to ASW units conducting exercises. During the winter of 1960, she provided services to 92 surface ships and 14 air squadrons participating in annual training exercises in the Caribbean. During the winter of 1962, she again returned to the Caribbean for an extended stay and, when not employed in servicing Atlantic Fleet air and surface ASW units, she tested and evaluated acoustical torpedoes. The following winter, 1963, she deployed to the Mediterranean Sea where she operated with the Sixth Fleet; and, on her return to New London in late May, she resumed school ship duties.

Eleven months later, Sarda was declared to be surplus to Navy needs. May 1964 was spent in port at New London preparing for inactivation; and, on 1 June, Sarda was decommissioned. Her name was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on the same day, and her hulk was sold for scrapping in March 1965.

Though she never saw combat action she is just as much an asset to the Navy and America as any combat unit. She tested new equipment, brought about new and better combat techniques, new ways of fleet-wide communication and collaboration, and most importantly of all, she trained those who did go into harms way.

Sadie Hawkins Day Race

Source:  University Archives Visual Materials Collection

Staff Person:  Arthur Carlson

Description: This photo from the University Archives shows East Carolina students participating in a 1953 Sadie Hawkins Day Race (UA55-01-4841). By tradition, on Sadie Hawkins Day girls ask boys to accompany them to a dance or on a date. The event originated in 1937 with the comic strip Li’l Abner when the town spinster, Sadie Hawkins, is sent in pursuit of the town’s eligible bachelors as they raced to avoid marriage to the “homeliest gal in the hills.”  The gender-based role reversal proved popular among female college students as Sadie Hawkins Day events rose in popularity across the nation. By 1952, Sadie Hawkins Day events were held in over 40,000 locations.  In this image, Fleming and Wilson Dormitories are on the right and the Old Cafeteria Complex is just visible on the left. The large building in the center rear is the original Austin classroom building.

UA55-01-4841

Presidential Candidate John Kennedy

My first thought when viewing this picture was about how the times have changed. This is Presidential Candidate John Kennedy riding in a motorcade on his way to an ECU rally. You would not see that today. Today important people travel in bullet proof limousines. I remember his campaign, and am saddened by what happened to him and his brother. BTW that’s a 1960 Mercury Monterey convertible that he’s riding in, and the car in front is a 1959 Cadillac (note the distinctive “fin” just to the left of center at the bottom).

U.S.S. South Dakota

USS South Dakota

 

Special Collections Reference: VA 63 .S72 1972

The USS South Dakota was the first of a group of fast battleships built under 1939 fiscal year appropriations just prior to World War II. The other vessels in her class were: Indiana, Massachusetts and Alabama. The USS South Dakota was built by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation in Camden, New Jersey and was launched on 7 June 1941 and commissioned on 20 March 1942. The South Dakota class vessels had nine 16-inch guns mounted in triple turrets. After commissioning she served in the Pacific where she promptly ran aground on a coral reef and had to go to Peal Harbor for repairs. At the Second Naval Battle of Guadalcanal she suffered a massive power failure and was out of action while receiving 42 topside hits. At this point the South Dakota returned to New York for repairs, after which she joined the British Home fleet for a period before returning to the Pacific again operating as a carrier escort. She ended the war in Tokyo Bay at the surrender of Japan. She was sold for scrap in 1962. Two sister ships remain as museums: Massachusetts and Alabama.

The C. Heber Forbes Store

Source: East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #741

C. Heber Forbes

C. Heber Forbes

Staff Person: Coleen Allen

Description:

This image dated March 30, 1960, is of the window displays from the C. Heber Forbes Store which was known for its high quality up-to-date ladies fashions. The store was originally located on Evans Street for many years. The owner, C. Heber Forbes, lived on Cotanche Street. His beautiful home and its breath-taking landscape was demolished for the location of what is now McDonald’s facing Tenth Street.

Source: Digital Collections, Joyner Library, ECU: http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/4575

Queen City Coach Company Letter, October 16, 1944

Source: Herbert Floyd Seawell, Jr. Papers, East Carolina Manscript Collection #496

Letter from Queen City Coach Company, Charlotte, NC

Letter from Queen City Coach Company, Charlotte, NC

Staff Person: Dale Sauter

Description:

In general, modern letterheads are not as ornate or colorful as they used to be. Perhaps one reason is that in today’s world we do not rely on actual letters as much for communication, and the minor details are considered unimportant. Yet, ironically, with today’s technology, it tends to be easier to design elaborate and colorful letterhead. With the existence of a large interest in advertising history, these letters serve as great historical artifacts, as well as great artistic statements. In a related note, for information on the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising and Marketing at Duke University’s Rare Book, Manuscript and Special Collections Library, see the link below.

http://library.duke.edu/specialcollections/hartman/index.html

Today’s staff pick is a letter from Queen City Coach Company, Charlotte, N.C., to Seawell & Seawell, Attorneys at Law, Carthage, N.C., dated October 16, 1944. In the letter, the coach company’s baggage agent is writing the attorneys to inform them that a customer’s lost baggage has been found and will be returned to her. For more information on the Seawell, Jr., Papers or any other collections we hold, please contact us for further details.

Click on the image itself to see an enlarged version.

Prohibition Propaganda Broadside, Circa 1908

Source: Getsinger Family Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #172

Staff Person: Dale Sauter

Description:

February 20th, 2008, will mark the 75th anniversary of the proposal by Congress of the Twenty-first Amendment to the United States Constitution. This Amendment brought about the repeal of Prohibtion in the United States. The amendment was fully ratified on December 5th, 1933, by 36 states. It was eventually ratified by all states except South Carolina.

Prohibition in the United States (making illegal the manufacture, sale, or transportation of liquors) was initially accomplished by the proposal of The Eighteenth Amendment on December 18th, 1917. This amendment was fully ratified on January 16th, 1919, by 36 states. It was eventually ratified by all states except Rhode Island. This amendment is notable as the only amendment to the Constitution that has been repealed. Prohibition didn’t officially go into effect until January 16th, 1920. A summary of the law can be found below.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prohibition_in_the_ United States

For more information, on Prohibition, please refer to the source above.

For information on the Getsinger Family Papers or any other collections we hold, please contact us for further details.

To view an enlarged version of the image, click on the image itself.

Henry Corbin Diary

Source: Guide to the Henry Corbin Papers, 1863-1864, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #161

Henry Corbin Diary

Henry Corbin Diary

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

Henry Corbin was a Fourth Sergeant in Company B of the 23rd Virginia Cavalry. He served with General Jubal A. Early in the Shenandoah Valley. His diary documents his activities from April 20, 1863, up until September 22, 1864, when he was killed at the battle of Fisher Hill. He also participated in the battles of Lynchburg, Monacacy and Winchester. The pages you see here were recorded right before he was killed. Click on the image to see additional pages that explain how the diary was found. Special Collections has other related manuscript collections such as the following: #246 Guide to the A.F. Williams Diary, #283 Guide to the New Bern Historical Society Collection, #338 Guide to the William W. Perry Diary and #537 Guide to the J.C. Hines Papers. More information about this collection can be obtained by going to Manuscript Collection 161

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.

Victoria Street, Barbados

Source: George Leland Dyer Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #340

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:
This view of Victoria Street on the island of Barbados was taken in 1875, probably by George Leland Dyer (Aug. 26, 1849-Apr. 2, 1914), a naval officer serving aboard the USS Frolic. The son of George Washington and Mary Kelley Dyer, he was born and reared in Calais, Maine. Appointed to the United States Naval Academy in 1866, Dyer was graduated with honors in 1870. He was made an ensign in July 1871 and was promoted through grades to the rank of commodore in 1908, when he retired. Included in this view are the old post office and the business (note hanging sign, right) of a watch and clockmaker. The George Leland Dyer Papers contain correspondence, diaries, photographs, and other materials that reflect Dyer’s naval career as well as the development of the U.S. Navy and naval technology during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. A finding aid describing the collection can be found at Manuscript Collection 340.

View of Victoria Street on the island of Barbados

View of Victoria Street on the island of Barbados