1706 Van der Aa Map of North Carolina

 

Source: Zee en Land togten der Franszen Geaan na,en in’t Americaans Gewest van Florida (MC 49)

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description: This 1706 map of the Carolinas and Florida drawn by Pieter van der Aa (1659-1733)  is based on an earlier 1606 map by Hondius (see MC 42). The map features a North Carolina Native American town called Chicola on the River Jordaan. Also shown are the locations of the ill fated French settlements of 1562 (Ribaut) and 1564 (Laudonierre). The lower right cartouche features a really neat early European drawing of the Carolina Palmetto (Sabal Palmetto). The title of the map Zee en Land togten der Franszen na,en in’t Americaans Gewest van Florida, aller-eerst dour Joh. Pontius ontdekt,  translates as the land of France in America along with the discoveries of Ponce de Leon.

Virginiae partiis australis, et Floridae partis orientalis, interjacentiumq[ue] regionum nova description

Source: Virginiae partis australis, et Floridae partis orientalis, interjacentiumq[ue] regionum nova description, by Willem Janszoon Blaeu, Amsterdam, J. and C. Blaeu, 1640; Special Collections Map Collection #2.3

Virginiae partis australis, et Floridae partis orientalis, interjacentiumq[ue] regionum nova descriptio.. by Willem Janszoon Blaeu

Virginiae partis australis, et Floridae partis orientalis, interjacentiumque regionum nova descriptio.. by Willem Janszoon Blaeu

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:

This map, part of Blaeu’s Le Thé&acirctre dv Monde, ou Novvel Atlas (Amsterdami, 1638, II 1640) plate 28-29, is based on the 1606 Hondius map, but according to William E. Cumming, “incorporates new geographical knowledge.” Specifically the 1640 map shows South Carolina more accurately and changes the shape of the Chesapeake Bay “from a small bay to its proper shape.” This is the first time Jamestown and many local Virginia Indian villages are shown on European maps. The more correct latitude of “Coft Feare” [Cape Fear] at 34° North replaces the incorrect 32° North shown by Hondius on his earlier map. The North Carolina sounds, especially Pamlico, have additional information collected by English explorers. Some of these new names were not retained in later usage, but the map demonstrates that European readers were interested in the latest information from the new world. A “P. Grinfeld” [Port Grenville] is noted as being perhaps near the current location of New Bern in Pamlico Sound. Cummingts further notes that “this [map] is the most correct map of this area yet to appear,” and was a key representation of the Carolinas through the end of the 17th century. Students of cartography often compare this map with the depiction of the North Carolina coast shown on the 1733 Moseley Map.

Special Collections Map Collection #MC0002.003 [Currently framed and on display in the Rare Book Room]

Bermuda Map

Source: Mappa Aestivarum Insularum alias Barmudas dictarum [Bermuda map], Special Collections Map Collection MC0035

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:

Mappa Aestivarum Insularum alias Barmudas dictarum [Bermuda map.] Amstelodami [Amsterdam,] Apud Henricum Hondium [Henry Hondius,] ca.1633?{some sources give date as 1621} 33 x 51 cm. Scale: 1:70,000. Special Collections Map Collection MC0035, Purchase, State Appropriated Funds, 2008.

Bermuda was discovered by the Europeans probably around 1503 and was included in Spanish charts as early as 1511. The island was named in honor of its supposed discoverer Juan de Bermudez. For around the next 100 years the island was visited by passing Portuguese and Spanish vessels looking for water. In 1609 the flagship of a Virginia Company fleet, the Sea Venture on a rescue mission to Jamestown, was wrecked on the island, leaving the English in control. This shipwreck is reported to have formed the basis for William Shakespeare’s play The Tempest. Bermuda at first passed to control of the Virginia Company and later in 1615 to the Somers Isles Company. Due to limited resources on the island, acts were passed in 1616 and 1620 banning the hunting of birds and turtles. These acts became the first conservation laws in the New World.

This map was drawn shortly after the Somers Isles Company took control of the island and was published, it is thought, in Amsterdam during the period 1621-1633. Distances on the map to Bermuda are given in “Stadiorum Milliarum” to Florida, Plymouth [Massachusetts], New England, Cape Henry, Cape Charles and Roanoak–the latter location marking the place of the famous “Lost Colony” of 1587. This map forms an interesting companion piece to other items in Special Collections, notably several travel accounts of the period and the “Croatan Archaeological site ring”.

To view an enlarged version of this image, click on the image itself.

Mappa Aestivarum Isularum alias Barmudas dictarum

Mappa Aestivarum Isularum alias Barmudas dictarum