The Life of Senator Robert Morgan

Senator Morgan attending the presentation of a new Wind Generator

Source: Robert Morgan Papers #268

Staff Person: Sherry Cortes

Description: Senator Robert Morgan was a North Carolina native, born and raised in Lillington, N.C.  This collection contains personal papers, Senatorial documents, newspapers, photographs and correspondence spanning Morgan’s life.

Senator Robert Morgan was born in Lillington, North Carolina in 1925.  Following his public school education, he went on to attend the Wake Forest Law School, became a skilled trial lawyer and quickly rose from Clerk of Court to the position of President Pro Tempore of the North Carolina State Senate.  He began donating his papers to East Carolina University in the mid-1970s and continuously donated his personal and professional works until he passed away in 2016.  I started working on the Senator Robert Morgan Papers Processing Project in April, 2017 for East Carolina University’s Joyner Library.  As the project archivist for this collection, it has been an exciting opportunity to chronicle the life and accomplishments of such a prominent figure in North Carolina history.  Senator Morgan served as a North Carolina State Senator from 1955-1969, and as a one-term US Senator from North Carolina from 1975-1981, but his prolific career beyond the political arena put a mark on so much of the State’s history.

The Robert Morgan Papers is the largest collection of personal and professional documents amassed by East Carolina University and is currently housed in the Special Collections Division of Joyner Library at East Carolina University (ECU).  The collection holds information regarding the Senator’s professional and personal life.  The Morgan archives chronicle his service in the Vietnam and Korean Wars, his rise to North Carolina Attorney General and his role in creating landmark consumer protection measures, his tenure as an ECU University Trustee and his fight to establish a medical school at East Carolina University, his controversial stance on the Panama Canal, his leading role in the Energy Crisis, and his repositioning of the State Bureau of Investigation (SBI).  These documents also shed light on his ideological metamorphosis from a “traditional Southern Democrat” to the national Democratic mainstream particularly in the area of desegregation.

Senator Morgan’s Papers include personal and family documents, legislative and campaign files, correspondence, North Carolina Attorney General and U.S. Senator files, ECU Board of Trustees and State Bureau of Investigations files.  Photographs, scrapbooks, newspaper clippings, speeches, books, films, audiotapes, diaries, microfilms and oversized materials are in our archives as well.  We hired two graduate assistants in May, 2017, Daniel Hemme and Martha Mihich who have been invaluable in completing the description and arrangement of the collection.  In addition to the graduate assistants, Special Collection Curator, Dr. Jonathan Dembo and volunteer Dick Wolfe have been helping to move the process along quickly.  Between the four of us we have currently completed describing 1012 boxes of the 1075 total in the collection.  I am also collaborating with Justin Borer to help in the digitization of audio tapes, manuscripts and photographs of interest.  Conservator Lawrence Houston has been providing conservation advice and assistance in handling damaged or fragile documents. We are all working as quickly as possible to digitize the chosen objects so they can be fully accessible in the online Digital Repository.

Once we have fully completed the processing of the paper and digital elements of the collection we will work on the exhibit which will be available for viewing on the 3rd floor of Joyner Library in

Graduate Assistant, Martha Mihich, hard at work

early 2018.  As work continues, we will be sharing updates about our progress on an ongoing basis and what we are finding.  There will be future posts to provide more information about Senator Morgan and some of the interesting items we find during processing.  Researchers will be able to locate the collection’s finding aid online if they are interested in accessing Senator Morgan’s Papers.

For more information on Senator Morgan’s Papers and the continuing progress of the project, please contact Sherry Cortes, Project Archivist at cortess17@ecu.edu or (252) 328 – 0276

City of Greenville, North Carolina

Source: Junius D. Grimes Papers (#571)

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

Take a step back in time to 1914 Greenville, N. C., in this C. E. Weaver Series, “Illustrated Cities”, by Central Publishing Co., Inc., in Richmond, Virginia. Greenville was growing and changing: The Center Brick Warehouse was selling Bright Leaf Tobacco (93,762 pounds avg. at $24.55 per hundred). The Flanagan Buggy Co. distributed products throughout Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, Florida and Alabama. The Greenville Ice and Coal Co. was a necessity for this community. The R.L. Smith Stables sold and exchanged horses and mules. The East Carolina Teachers Training School is now called East Carolina University; the campus consisted of the Power House, Dining Hall, Infirmary, Dormitories and the Administration Building and the soon to be erected library, gymnasium and the President’s Residence. These are just a few highlights from the pamphlet from the Junius D. Grimes Papers #571.

Domestic Disturbances

Special Collections Reference U 230 .U6 1945
United States Army Field Manuals are currently published by the Army’s Publishing Directorate. Over 500 manuals are currently in use. They provided detailed directions for soldiers to use in the field on a variety of topics including tactics and repair of equipment. This particular manual, published in 1945 provided instructions to troops on how to control domestic disturbances. Topics covered included: authorization regulations for the use of military troops to control civil unrest, crowd control, mob tactics, “offensive actions against a city,” and restoration of civil order. The manual ends with tactical directions for the use of chemical agents to control civilian groups. The tactics and methods outlined in this manual were used by federal, state and local authorities in the 1960s and 1970s to control civil and student unrest in the United States.

Advertising Pamphlet for Keeley Institute, Greensboro, N.C.

Source: Edward Merritt McEachern, Jr., Collection  #25.2.c

Staff Person:  Martha Elmore

Description:  The Keeley Institute in Greensboro, N.C., was established circa 1891 and it survived until 1961.  From 1906 on the Institute operated at Blandwood, the former home of N.C. Governor John Motley Morehead.  The Greensboro location was just one of over more than 200 branches of the original Keeley Institute founded in 1879 in Dwight, Illinois, for the purpose of administering the Keeley Cure to alcoholics. [Source: Wikipedia and Preservation Greensboro Incorporated]    

This undated pamphlet illustrates the before and after caricatures of an alcoholic who takes the cure at the Keeley Institute in Greensboro, N.C.  The top half of the pamphlet opens up to reveal the cured patient.  For a related collection, see the William H. Osborn Papers Manuscript Collection #41. Col. Osborn owned the Keeley Institute in Greensboro for many years.

Pungent Paragraphs from the New Louisburg College

Source: Thomas A. Person Papers, Manuscript Collection #303

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:

This promotional brochure describes changes that were taking place at Louisburg College in Louisburg, N.C. The college had opened in 1857 to educate young women. A fire in 1928 seriously damaged the handsome Greek Revival Main Building, and the Great Depression curtailed enrollment, causing the college to incur significant debt. In response to this crisis, in 1931 the college admitted young men for the first time. Enrollment increased significantly. In this optimistic description of the “new” college, Isabelle Ziegler, a teacher of foreign languages, offered her view of the spirit of the institution: “Spirit at Louisburg College is that Something which with one gusty effort has blown away forever all the dust and death of the ages and has filled the lungs of this old College with the clear, cold, glorious atmosphere of the heights, which has given these two hundred young men and women the mental, spiritual and physical energy to seize this old world and carry it on their shoulders with Homeric laughter to the very heights.”

Virginia Dare Shores, North Carolina 1927

Source: Virginia Dare Shores, North Carolina, Joyner NC Rare
HD1390.5 .V57 1927 

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

This is a pamphlet by Carolina Development Company in it they give alluring descriptions of the Roanoke Colonies and its history endeavoring to sell the land. On page 5 there is a rare reprint of an original map by John White (1587). 

 

Programme & Constitution of the Communist Party of Lesotho

Source: Programme & Constitution of the Communist Party of Lesotho, Hoover DT 2618.C65 1960

Programme & Constitution of the Communist Party of Lesotho
Programme & Constitution of the Communist Party of Lesotho

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:

Lesotho is a small country completely surrounded by South Africa. Known as Basutoland during its period of control by the British, the Kingdom of Lesotho achieved independence in 1966. The Basuto National Party ruled the country for its first two decades. After seven years of military rule, constitutional government was restored in 1993. Violence and bloodshed, in part a result of intervention by troops from South Africa and Botswana, later disrupted the country. Today constitutional rule has been restored in Lesotho. Its impoverished people are chiefly engaged in subsistence agriculture and, according to a profile published by the CIA, the inequity in the distribution of national wealth is a problem.

Published by the Communist Party of Lesotho, this pamphlet advocates independence and self-government for Basutoland as a means of achieving the benefits of communism. It is one of hundreds of pamphlets, books, and periodicals in the Special Collections Department’s Hoover Collection on International Communism.

Mary Jordan White 1859-1909

Source: Belvidere Academy Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #4

Mary Jordan White 1859-1909

Mary Jordan White 1859-1909

Staff Person: Jonathan Dembo

Description:

This small pamphlet details the life and death of Mary Jordan White, a student, teacher, and principal at Belvidere Academy, in Belvidere, a small, predominantly Quaker, village in Perquimans County, North Carolina. Established in the 1680s, Belvidere was one of the oldest communities in North Carolina. Its Quaker population survived many difficulties associated with their unpopular religious principles of non-violence, opposition to slavery, and refusal to serve in the military even during wartime. While many members of the community emigrated, a hard core remained. Miss White dedicated her life to preserving both her community and her faith by teaching and by example and through her leadership of Belvidere Academy. Shown above are the first two pages of the pamphlet.

Source: Belvidere Academy Papers (Manuscript Collection #4.1.b) Gift of William E. “Mickey” Elmore, 6/14/1999.

Mary Jordan White 1859-1909

Mary Jordan White 1859-1909

United Confederate Veterans Song Book

Source: Richard Porson Paddison Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #327

Staff Person: Brian Johnson

Description:

The first image below is that of the cover of a songbook titled United Confederate Veterans Song Book, ca. 1890-1900, which contains many songs relating to the southern states prior to, during and after the Civil War. The second image is that of the first song in the book, “Old North State,” North Carolina’s state song. This and many other interesting books and pamphlets, as well as numerous letters written during the Civil War can be found in the Richard Porson Paddison Papers in the Special Collections Department at Joyner Library. http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/special/ead/findingaids/0327/

Richard Porson Paddison, lived in Virginia and Boston, Massachusetts, and finally returned to the South, taking up residence in North Carolina in 1860. Paddison moved to Point Caswell in Pender County, N.C., after the Civil War, where he operated steamboats on Black and Cape Fear rivers. Paddison lived at Point Caswell for the reminder of his life except for the years 1886-1897, when he resided in Titusville, Florida.

United Confederate Veterans Song Book, ca. 1890-1900

United Confederate Veterans Song Book, ca. 1890-1900

United Confederate Veterans Song Book, ca. 1890-1900

United Confederate Veterans Song Book, ca. 1890-1900

Who Wants War?: How the Soviet Union Builds for Peace

Source: Who Wants War?: How the Soviet Union Builds for Peace: an eye-witness report, Hoover HC336 C53 1951

Cover of Who wants war? how the Soviet Union builds for peace

Cover of Who wants war? how the Soviet Union builds for peace

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:

The Korean War had “stabilized” by June 1951 following MacArthur’s landings at Inchon (Operation Chromite) in September of 1950. On April 11, 1951, President Truman removed MacArthur for disagreeing with U.S. war aims. MacArthur responded with his famous statement, “In war there is no substitute for Victory.” Some Americans urged all out war with the Soviets. This pamphlet from the Hoover Collection is typical of tracts distributed by the Soviets in the United States. Subtitled “How the Soviet Union Builds for Peace,” Who Wants War was written by Joseph Clark, the Moscow corespondent of the American communist newspaper, The Daily Worker. Clark, who was a World War II veteran, reported back to America on various peacetime public works projects in the Soviet Union. The pamphlet stresses Soviet peace proposals and the fact that the “Soviet people [could] look to a bright future.” It goes on to note that the soon to be President Dwight David Eisenhower “would ‘instantly’ use the atom bomb” if it promised to give advantage,” in a full scale war with the Soviet Union. Clark asks, “Are we Americans in danger as a result of what is happening in the U.S.S.R? Are Americans, dying on battlefields 5,000 miles from their homes because of anything going on in Russia?” He concludes that ‘Soviet aggression’ is a monstrous fraud upon the American people, designed to cover up the Truman-Wall Street drive toward a new atomic war.” In July of 1953 the commanders of the American, Chinese and North Korean armies agreed to an “Armistice.” This helped President Eisenhower fulfill a 1952 campaign promise to try to find out what he could do to end the war in Korea. South Korea never agreed to the “Armistice.”

Joseph Clark, “Who Wants War?: How the Soviet Union Builds for Peace (New York: New Century Publishers, June 1951) 16pp. Special Collections Hoover Collection HC336 C53 1951.

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.

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