Peter Stuart Ney

Source: William E. Elmore Collection (EC Manuscript Collection #39.1.f)

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description: Michel Ney, 1st Duc d’Elchingen, 1st Prince de la Moskowa, popularly known as Marshall Ney was a eighteenth and nineteenth century French military commander. After service during the French Revolutionary Wars and the Napoleonic Wars, Ney fell out of favor and was arrested and condemned to death for treason in December of 1815. In January of 1816 Peter Stuart Ney arrived at Charleston, SC., where he subsequently disappeared. In 1821 he appeared in Mocksville, NC where he assumed the position of a school teacher. He also worked as a teacher in Hillsborough, Salisbury and Mecklenburg county before returning again to Mocksville. He died there on 15 November 1826 and is buried at the Third Creek Presbyterian Church. This document typed in August of 1908 at Roaring River, NC, relates the life of Peter Stuart Ney, the Great Marshall of France. In the relation Peter Stuart Ney’s grandson, E. M. C. Neyman of Saltillo, IN, states that his grandfather was in fact the Michel Ney. This document is signed by James H. Foote, born 8 November 1825 and “is taken as proof that the old Tar Heel Teacher was the Great Marshall of France.” At the bottom the relation is noted as being done “at the request of my friend, Judge Allen.” A pencil notation on the first page states “copyied and sent to the Historical Society.”

Russian Phrase Book

4 April 2012

Source: Special Collections Reference Collection PG2689 .U56 1943

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description: This restricted World War II publication by the War Department “contains the Russian words and expressions you are most likely to need.” It was designed for use by Allied service personnel serving in the Soviet Union. The book contains such useful phrases as “Help”, “I am lost”, “I am poisoned”, “He was bitten by a snake” as well as “The U.S. Government will pay you” translated into Russian. One section on communications contains the phrases “reverse the charges” and “Will you speak to anybody at that number?” Designed as handy little helps for service personnel the book was designed to be shown to the person speaking Russian, and no doubt came in handy when “in-country.” While the publication was restricted, it could be shared with “persons of undoubted loyalty and discretion.” This Army Technical Manual as well as a number of others were given to Joyner Library by Professor Larry Babits of the History Department.

At the Copa…

This photograph features Chancellor Leo Jenkins along with Jack Minges and Waightstill H. “Booger” Scales at the famed Copacabana Club in New York City.  Taken in October of 1963, the trio had much to celebrate including the recent opening of Ficklen Stadium.  Scales, considered East Carolina’s greatest fundraiser, organized a group that sought donations from Greenville area businesses to fund the stadium’s construction.   Scales and his committee raised nearly $215,000 (approximately $1,524,894 in 2010, adjusted for inflation) in a single week.  Scales later assisted and served as the first president of the Century Club (now Pirate Club).  As a testament to their efforts on behalf of East Carolina, Minges Coliseum and W.H. Scales Field House bear the names of these men.  Both facilities are instrumental to the continued success of Pirate Athletics.  To learn more about the growth of East Carolina University, please visit the University Archives.



Wild Cat

S

Source: 
 George Willcox McIver Papers Manuscript Collection #251)

George Willcox McIver was born on December 22, 1858, at Carthage, N.C., and died in 1947 at the age of eighty-nine. He was the son of Alexander McIver, a noted North Carolina educator, and Mary Ann Willcox. McIver was appointed to West Point in 1877 and graduated with the class of 1882. Upon graduation, he began a military career of forty years of active service including duty in the United States, Alaska, Cuba, France, and the Philippine Islands.

Before U.S. intervention in World War I, McIver was promoted to Brigadier General and took command of the 161st Brigade of the 81st (Wild Cat) Division which trained at Camp Jackson and Camp Sevier, South Carolina. This unit became incorporated into the American Expeditionary Force and participated in the Meuse-Argonne offensive. From 1919 until his retirement in 1922, McIver was stationed at Fort Pike, Arkansas, and Fort Slocum, New York.

 

Staff person: Ralph Scott

Menu from the Willoughby Beach Hotel

Source: Benjamin B. Winborne Papers, 1872-1930 #691.005

Menu from the Willoughby Beach Hotel

Menu from the Willoughby Beach Hotel

Staff Person: Dale Sauter

Description:

Today’s staff pick features a menu from the Willoughby Beach Hotel (Willoughby Beach, VA) dated July 15, 1905.

This item came from the Benjamin B. Winborne Papers.

Not much information was readily available on the hotel; however, the link below offers a few clues to its past.

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/Iccn/sn85038615/1906-06-17/ed-1/seg-47.pdf/

Willoughby Beach Hotel Menu

Willoughby Beach Hotel Menu

For more information on this collection or any other collections we hold, please contact us for further details.

The collection can be found at http://specialcollections.ecu.edu/special/ead/findingaids/0691-005/

Master Mason Certificate, Belmont Lodge No. 108, Duplin Co., N.C.

Source: Elizabeth Rudder Fearrington Croom Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #0058

Staff Person: Martha Elmore

Description:

Freemasonry has a long history in North Carolina back to colonial times and still has a strong presence with 375 lodges and 47,000 members (2007, www.grandlodge-nc.org/freemasonryrevealed/atlantic.htm). It is thought that the society developed from stonemason guilds in the Middle Ages, but today it is a fraternal order centered on the principles of self-improvement and philanthropy. One must apply to be a member and once accepted, one studies the principles and teachings of Freemasonry to work through the three degrees of apprentice, fellow craft, and master mason. Masons meet as lodges in buildings referred to as Masonic lodges.

Below is a certificate stating that Samuel R. Ireland became a Regular Master Mason on March 28, 1846, with the Belmont Lodge No. 108 in Duplin County, North Carolina.

Master Mason Certificate, Belmont Lodge No. 108, Duplin Co., N.C.

Master Mason Certificate, Belmont Lodge No. 108, Duplin Co., N.C.

To learn more about the Ireland family of Duplin and Sampson Counties, N.C., go to http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/special/ead/findingaids/0058/.

Travel for Academic Credit

Source: Paul Ricks Papers, University Archives #UA90-02, East Carolina University, Greenville, N.C.

Rick's Tour Bus

Rick's Tour Bus

Staff Person: Kacy Guill

Description:

In 1935, East Carolina Teachers College obtained the services of Paul T. Ricks as director of a new travel course designed to meet the needs of travel-hungry students. For the initial tour, more than a hundred students filled a large bus and several touring cars. The tours provided three hours of credit in geography, American literature, and history, and satisfied requirements for college electives or renewal credits for teacher certification. So great was the demand for these economical study-vacations that three separate three-week tours were operated the first summer and an expanded schedule of tours was arranged until the restrictions of World War II brought them to an end.

Click on the images to see an enlarged version.

Field Trip Advertisement

Field Trip Advertisement

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Source: J.C. Peele, M.D. Papers, ca. 1918-1987, undated, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #1030.25.g

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Staff Person: Nanette Hardison

Description:

The J.C. Peele, M.D. Papers (ca. 1918-1987, n.d.) is a manuscript collection that reflects the anti-communist sentiments of a physician in Kinston, N.C. This publication from the collection, dated May 1968, is a compilation of selected articles and documents pertaining to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s beliefs, ideals, and activities. Despite the booklet’s negative bias, the publication provides useful information and photos of Dr. King, his family, and the people who assisted him in his non-violent crusade for civil rights for all Americans.

1918 Flu Pandemic nickname “Spanish Flu”, March 1918 to June 1920

Source: University Archives

ECTTS Board of Trustees Minute Book 1

ECTTS Board of Trustees Minute Book 1

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

Health conditions at ECTTC are one of the major topics mentioned in the Board of Trustees minutes from 1918. There were 141 cases of the Spanish flu recorded on campus, but there was no record of serious complications. Worldwide this was not the same. This flu epidemic was called “the greatest medical holocaust in history.” The pandemic infected one third of the world’s population, and most of its victims were young healthy adults. Normally influenza attacks the weakest population, namely infants and the elderly. The images shown below are two documents from the ECTTC Board of Trustees Minutes Book 1, November 15, 1918 which is in the University Archives.

President Wright’s Chapel Talk Concerning the Budget

Source: University Archives, Chancellor’s Office, Record Group CH1050, Series 2, Subseries 1, Box 1, Folder 6

Staff Person: Brian Johnson

Description:

The images below are from East Carolina Teachers College President Robert H. Wright’s “Chapel Talks” given to students every morning from 9:30 to 10:25 six days a week. Chapel Talks typically consisted of a reading from the Bible followed by Wright’s thoughts regarding the Bible passage or some other moral instruction for the students, along with any news, schedule changes, or other announcements. The subject of this address is the budgetary process and Wright’s concern over the lack of funds for ECTC.

This and other speeches may be found in the records of the Chancellor’s Office, Record Group CH1050, Series 2, Subseries 1, Box 1, Folder 6, in the University Archives.

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.

President Wright's Chapel Talk Concerning the Budget

President Wright's Chapel Talk Concerning the Budget

President Wright's Chapel Talk Concerning the Budget

President Wright's Chapel Talk Concerning the Budget

President Wright's Chapel Talk Concerning the Budget

President Wright's Chapel Talk Concerning the Budget

President Wright's Chapel Talk Concerning the Budget

President Wright's Chapel Talk Concerning the Budget