Great American Cock, Male (Wild Turkey)

Source:  Rare QL674.A9 2006

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:

Study for the Great American Cock, Male one of the major plates in the large elephant folio edition of Birds of America by John James Audubon (1785-1851), artist, and William Home Lizars (1788-1859), engraving done around 1826, in Lousiana. Watercolor on paper, 37 ­x 25 1/2 inches. This print is from the New-York Historical Society edition of Audubon’s fifty best watercolors from the original watercolors preparatory for John James Audubon’s Birds of America, Chicago, Oppenheimer editions, ca. 2006.

Vaisseau de 90 Canons "Le Suffren" 1829

Source: Rare Books Vault V13.F82 P37 1883 plate 48

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description: A vessel of 90 canons named “Le Suffren” in the French Navy in 1829.  Le Suffren was named after the French  Admiral Pierre Andre Suffren de Saint Tropez (1729-1788), the third son of the marquis de Saint Tropez. From 1776 to 1783 Admiral Suffren fought British Naval Forces in American, European and Indian waters. In 1783 at the Battle of Culladore, Suffren forced the English admiral Sir Edward Hughes to retire, thereby preventing a re-supply fleet from reaching the colony of India. Several subsequent French naval vessels were named after Admiral Suffren: a pre-dreadnought in 1899, a heavy cruiser in 1927 and frigate class laid down in 1962. This print is from a book of reproductions of maritime models held by the Louvre Museum in Paris, France. Le Suffren was laid down on 21 August 1824 and launched 27 August 1829. Renamed Le Ajax as a hulk on 8 August 1865, she was scrapped in 1874. Le Suffren displaced 4,000 tons and had a length of 60 meters and a beam of 16 meters. She was one of the largest wooden warships of her day.

Virginia Dare Shores, North Carolina 1927

Source: Virginia Dare Shores, North Carolina, Joyner NC Rare
HD1390.5 .V57 1927 

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

This is a pamphlet by Carolina Development Company in it they give alluring descriptions of the Roanoke Colonies and its history endeavoring to sell the land. On page 5 there is a rare reprint of an original map by John White (1587). 

 

Annual Register

Source: Annual Register, or a View of the History, Politicks and Literature of the Year, Rare Book Collection #D 2 A7

Title page of the Annual Register, or a View of the History, Politicks and Literature of the Year 1758

Title page of the Annual Register, or a View of the History, Politicks and Literature of the Year 1758

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:

Annual Register, or a View of the History, Politicks and Literature of the Year…, was printed by James and Robert Dodsley and edited by Edmund Burke (1729-1797) a Whig statesman, political theorist, and philosopher. The first volume came in 1758. Burke is remembered primarily for his A Vindication of Natural Society (1756) and his opposition to the French Revolution. The Register is an important historical reference work and is an annual review of the year’s major events, developments, and views of world events. It was an early forerunner of modern works like the World Almanac. In the Annual Register the editor has selected essays or articles describing important events in sports, arts, religion, science, law, history, politics, government, and the environment that happened during the past year. Obituaries, book reviews, book digests, letters and selected documents are also included. For example, the 1758 volume (the first year) contains a lengthy account of a fire on board H.M.S. Prince George, off Lisbon. A midshipman writes of the fire, “Such a terrible fight the oldest men of the fleet say they never saw,” as the crew struggled to save the vessel. Of the ship’s complement of 745, only 260 were saved by crews of the H.M.S. Glasgow and Alderney. A Rev. Sharpe on the Prince George noted that more might have been saved by the crew of the Alderney, had not the crew also been so “employed in saving geese, fowls, tables, chairs, and whatever else of the kind [that] came near them.”

The Annual Register is still published today by ProQuest. The Rare Book Collection in Special Collections has a set that runs from 1758 to 1825. Most of the volumes have been rebound in library buckram, but one year, 1784, is in the original binding. This volume has the bookplate of the Rev. Alexander Scott, who was chaplain to Vice Admiral Horation Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson, 1st Duke of Bronte. Scott was chaplain to Nelson at the Battle of Trafalgar and also served as Nelson’s private secretary.

Special Collections Rare D 2 A7

The Microscope

Source: The Construction of Timber, from Its Early Growth, Explained by the Microscope, Rare Book QK 475 H64 1770

Construction of Timber

Construction of Timber

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:

Antonie van Leeuwenhoek is generally credited with the first practical application of the compound microscope around the latter half of the seventeenth century. During his life he made more than 400 lenses and 300 different types of microscopes. Dendrochronology is a modern technique for scientific dating using tree ring growth. However, in the eighteenth century, Sir John Hill (1716-1775) wrote an interesting treatise on the growth of timber using the new microscope as a scientific tool. Hill noted the increase in growth of tree rings as he made experiments on various types of trees. Timber was an important commodity to the English as their colonies provided a major source of naval stores. Hill, who is primarily known as an “indefatigable” writer and editor of the British Magazine, was knighted for his illustrated botanical compendium The Vegetable System.

Hill, John, The Construction of Timber, from Its Early Growth, Explained by the Microscope. London, printed for the author, 1770.

Rare QK 475 H64 1770

The “Maine”

Source: The “Maine”; an account of her destruction in Havana Harbor, Joyner Rare E 721.6 S57

The "Maine"

The "Maine"

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:

USS Maine, a 6682-ton second-class battleship, was built at the New York Navy Yard and commissioned in September 1895. Her active career was spent operating along with U.S. east coast and in the Caribbean area. In January 1898, Maine was sent to Havana, Cuba, to protect U.S. interests during a time of local insurrection and civil disturbances. Three weeks later, on 15 February, the battleship was sunk by a massive explosion that killed the great majority of her crew. This volume is the personal narrative of Captain Charles D. Sigsbee. His conclusion as to the destruction of the vessel largely follow the findings of the official Navy inquiry, which found that an external mine sunk the vessel. In 1976 Admiral Hyman Rickover, using World War II explosion data, concluded that the damage came from inside the vessel, probably from a coal bunker. A 1999 investgation using more modern methods was inconclusive. President Theodore Roosevelt, Assistant Secretary of the Navy at the time of the sinking, stated, “We will probably never find out definitely,” what happened. Conspiracy theorists of course still have a field day with the sinking of the vessel.

Joyner Rare E 721.6. S57

Charles D. Sigsbee, The “Maine”; an account of her destruction in Havana Harbor, New York Century Company, 1899. 270pp.

Click on the image to view an enlarged version.

The History of the Bucaniers of America

Source: The History of the Bucaniers of America

The History of the Bucaniers of America

The History of the Bucaniers of America

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:

Esquemelin, Alexandre Oliver

The History of the Bucaniers of America; from the first original down to this time; written in several languages and now collected into one volume. London: Newborough, Nicholson and Tocke, 1704.

Rare Book Collection: In Conservation

Alexandre Esquemelin (ca. 1645-1707) first published the most important 17th century history of the pirates in Dutch in 1678 under the title De Americaensche Zee-Roovers (Amsterdam, Jan ten Hoorn). Believed to be a French Huguenot refugee, Esquemelin traveled with the French West India Company to Tortuga in 1666. There he encountered many famous pirates including Henry Morgan, with whom he worked in a vague medical capacity until 1674, at which point Esquemelin returned to Europe. His name appears later as a “surgeon” during the French surprise attack on Cartagena, Colombia, on May 6, 1697. This raid was conducted with the assistance of “buccaneers” who became upset when the French carted all of the loot back with them to France, leaving extortion and murder. It is probably from these exploits that Esquemelin drew his pirate portraits found in his History of the Bucaniers of America.

The portrait shown here is of the pirate Roche Brasiliano (formerly of Brazil), who lived with the “Society of Pirats” on the island of Jamaica, from which he plundered the Spanish galleon fleets in the Caribbean.

Lusty Wind For Carolina

Source: Lusty Wind For CarolinaJoyner Rare PS3511 L449 L8 1944b

Lusty Wind for Carolina

Lusty Wind for Carolina

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:

Minna Towner Englis [Inglis?] Clark Fletcher (1879-1969), known to readers of her books as Inglis Fletcher, was born in Alton, Illinois. She married John George Fletcher on April 16, 1902, and the couple moved to California. Peggy, as Mrs. Fletcher was known, followed her husband as he worked in several mining camps in California, Oregon, and Alaska. While living in Spokane, Washington, during and after World War I, Mrs. Fletcher performed considerable volunteer work for the Red Cross. While in Washington she met Arctic explorer Vilhjalmur Stefansson, who encouraged her to write.

It was not until 1931, however, that she published her first book, The White Leopard. Another eight years passed before her first Carolina novel, Raleigh’s Eden, was deemed publishable by The Bobbs-Merrill Company. Thereafter Mrs. Fletcher produced novels regularly: Men of Albemarle (1942), Lusty Wind for Carolina (1944), Toil of the Brave (1946), Roanoke Hundred (1948), Bennett’s Welcome (1950), Queen’s Gift (1952), The Scotswoman (1955), Wind in the Forest (1957), Pay, Pack, and Follow and Cormorant’s Brood (1959), The Wicked Lady (1961), and Rogue’s Harbor (1964). This edition of Lusty Wind is dedicated to Vilhjamur Stefansson.Inglis Fletcher, Lusty Wind For Carolina, Philadelphia, Blakiston Company, 1944.

Special Collections, Rare Books, PS3511 L449 L8 1944b

Secotan

Source: Admiranda narratio, fida tamen, de commodis et incolarvm ritibvs Virginiae . . . , Joyner Rare F229.B78 1590

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:
This engraving depicts the Native American village of Secotan, located somewhere along the Pamlico River, at the time of Walter Raleigh’s 1585-86 colonization effort. Two important members of this colony were scientist Thomas Harriot and John White, a talented artist. Before leaving the area for his return to England, White made sketches of Indians that he later rendered in handsome watercolor paintings. In 1588, Harriot published A Briefe and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia, which described portions of the coastal region of North Carolina and its inhabitants. Two years later, Theodor de Bry published this work along with a series of copperplate engravings based on the watercolors by John White. Editions appeared in English, French, German, and Latin. Recently Joyner Library, with the help of the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences, acquired a copy of the 1590 Latin edition of Harriot’s important text.

This image is particularly important because it reveals much about the agricultural practices of the Native Americans. Note the platform in the corn field used to scare away hungry birds!

Click on the image to see an enlarged version

Admiranda narratio, fida tamen, de commodis et incolarvm ritibvs Virginiae ... Anglico scripta sermone à Thoma Harriot

Admiranda narratio, fida tamen, de commodis et incolarvm ritibvs Virginiae ... Anglico scripta sermone à Thoma Harriot

The book, part of Joyner Library’s Rare Book Collection, is available for use in the Special Collections Department’s Search Room.

Blackbeard

Source: General History of the Pyrates, Joyner Rare F2161.D4/1724b

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:
This image of the pirate Blackbeard is the first likeness of him to appear in print. The image is from the Rare Book Collection’s copy of the two-volume General History of the Pyrates (1724), by “Captain Charles Johnson.” Some scholars believe that the book was written by Daniel Defoe.

The book is available in the Rare Book Collection (Joyner Rare F2161.D4 1724b) and in the Eastern North Carolina Digital Library.

Blackbeard the pirate

Blackbeard the pirate