UN Walkout

Source: University Archives

Staff Person: Kacy Guill

Description:

On Friday, April 7, 1967, eight delegates from North Carolina College at Durham (now North Carolina Central University) and Florida A&M University, who were on campus attending the ninth annual Middle South Model United Nations, walked out of the General Assembly. The African American delegates stated that they had been discriminated against by both the Model UN and ECC students and administrators.

Although the official conclusion was that the delegates from North Carolina College and Florida A&M University came to the assembly in search of publicity and attention, it was the first time since the integration of ECC that college officials were forced to publicly address discrimination on campus.

Sources:

“Take Up the Revolution.” East Carolinian, April 11, 1967.

Steve A. Baldwin. Letter to the Editor. East Carolinian, April 18, 1967.

Take Up the Revolution

Take Up the Revolution

Letter to the Editor; S. Baldwin

Letter to the Editor; S. Baldwin

Use of Closed Circuit TV Marks the Beginning of ECU's Technological Progress

Source: University Archives

East Carolinian front page, 1958

East Carolinian front page, 1958

Staff Person: L. K. Gypsye Legge

Description:

In 2008, East Carolina University celebrates the Golden Anniversary of homecoming with our Golden Class: the graduates of 1958. That year, East Carolina College, as the institution was then known, celebrated 50 years of higher education in Eastern North Carolina with an enthusiasm as great as we have seen for the centennial of East Carolina Unversity. Reviewing documents of the era for an exhibit to honor visiting alumni, I found the image below amusing and enlightening:

A 21-inch television seems almost quaint, as an educational experiment, in light of the more than 300 Smart Classrooms, complete with computer controlled projectors and web access, available today. There is also a reference to Joyner Library as the site of the studios. Even with progress, some things are constant. Today Joyner Library still contains studios, but now the focus is on videoconferencing [http://www.ecu.edu/cs-lib/systems/JL_Videoconferencing.cfm, accessed November 5, 2008.]

ECU has the largest distance education prograrm in North Carolina [http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/DEOrientation/upload/StudentSept07.htm, accessed November 5, 2008.] With this anonymous news item and photo, it becomes clear that many of our current achievements are the result of decades of effort pursuing all avenues to provide effective education for all students enrolled in East Carolina University.

Gazette of the United States and the NC Ratification of the US Constitution

Source: Gazette of the United States Collection, 1790, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #873

Gazette of the United States Collection

Gazette of the United States Collection

Staff Person: Jonathan Dembo

Description:

This particular issue of The Gazette of the United States from January 1790 is of special interest to North Carolinians. Page 314 of The Gazette (shown above, right hand page) includes a letter from President Washington announcing that a constitutional convention in the State of North Carolina had ratified the United States Constitution in November 1789. It also includes the full text of the resolution itself and a letter from Samuel Johnston, the President of the convention, conveying resolution. North Carolina was the 12th of the original 13 states to ratify the Constitution.

The Gazette is also of historical interest. It was first issued on April 15, 1789 to support President George Washington and the policies and candidates of the emerging Federalist Party. Originally published in New York, by its editor John Fenno, it moved to Philadelphia in 1790 when United States Government made that city its new temporary capital. A bi-weekly, it was sold throughout the country wherever the nation’s mail carriers could carry it.

Clearly partisan, The Gazette’s writers — often anonymous or pseudonymous–supported Federalist positions, politicians, or policies and criticized opponents of the government. It included many pieces containing personal attacks on Federalist opponents. Among the paper’s writers was Alexander Hamilton, who appeared under various noms de plume.

The Gazette was especially important in promoting the development of political parties and politics in the new nation. Its success also led to the rise of a competitor, the National Gazette, which was founded at the urging of anti-Federalist leaders Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in order to promote their own party. The anti-Federalist Party later evolved into today’s Democratic Party.

Gazette of the United States Collection

Gazette of the United States Collection

A facsimile of The Gazette will appear in a special exhibit of rare archival materials relating to the Constitution drawn from the Special Collections of Joyner Library. The exhibit will be on display in Mendenhall Student Center during the week of 14-20 September 2008. The exhibit will focus on freedom of speech and will appear as part of East Carolina University’s recognition of Constitution Day 2008.

Source: Gazette of the United States, Issue No. 30 (13 January 1790), Gazette of the United States Collection #873.1.os Special Collections Department, J. Y. Joyner Library.

You may access the finding aid to the Gazette of the United States Collection at http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/special/ead/findingaids/0873/

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.

New Year Message

Source: East Carolina Teachers College News, SL 2650 Series 1, Sub-series 1

East Carolina Teachers College News Vol. 1, No. 6

East Carolina Teachers College News Vol. 1, No. 6

Staff Person: Brian Johnson

Description:

This image is an excerpt from the January 7, 1924, Vol. 1, No. 6 issue of the East Carolina Teachers College News. The first article in this issue is a New Year message from College President, Robert Wright, containing some common sense advice given to the students on the first morning of the spring semester. Part of this advice was, “Don’t waste time regretting the past, yesterday is gone and tomorrow is yet in your grasp: only now is yours.”

This and many other University publications can be found in the University Archives http://www.ecu.edu/cs-lib/archives/fa.cfm

To view an enlarged version of the image, click on the image itself.

The Workers Vanguard

Source: Workers Vanguard, uncataloged periodical, Hoover Collection

Workers vanguard front page

Workers vanguard front page

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:
The Workers Vanguard is the official publication of the International Communist League (Fourth International). The International Communist League (sometimes known in the United States as the Spartacist League), describes itself as “a proletarian, revolutionary and international tendency committed to the task of building Leninist parties and national sections of a democratic centralist international.” In January of 1919 V.I. Lenin called upon the left wing of the Socialist Party of America to join the Communist International (Comintern). This left wing attempted to gain control of the Socialist Party, but party leaders were tipped off and arranged for the Chicago Police to throw out the left wing members at the meeting. This left wing became the current Communist Party USA. In 1937 a “Revolutionary Tendency” was again formed in the American Socialist Workers Party (SWP). This Lenin/Trotsky “Tendency” was expelled from the SWP in 1963 and in 1966 formed the Spartacist League/U.S. The Workers Vanguard is the main party organ. This issue features an article on immigration reform showing pickets at the Smithfield Food plant in Tar Heel, NC.

Ada Delutuk Blackjack

Source: Inglis Fletcher Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #21

Ada Blackjack and her son.

Ada Blackjack and her son.

Staff Person: Martha Elmore

Description:
Ada Delutuk was an Eskimo born in Alaska in 1898 who was raised from the age of about ten by missionaries in Nome. By 1921 she was divorced from Jack Blackjack and had temporarily placed her sick child Bennett in an orphanage while she tried to earn a living as a seamstress. At this same time, Vilhjalmur Stefansson was putting together an arctic expedition to Wrangel Island which was located 200 miles northeast of Siberia and 400 miles northwest of Alaska. Ada Blackjack and several Eskimo families were recruited to help the four members of the expedition: Allan Crawford, Lorne Knight, Fred Maurer, and Milton Galle. When it came time for the ship Silver Wave to depart on September 9, 1921, Ada Blackjack was the only Eskimo who showed up to accompany the expedition. Despite misgivings, she sailed with the four men.

On September 16, 1921, the expedition arrived at Wrangel Island claiming it for Great Britain and the ship departed, leaving them on their own for a year. On August 20, 1922, the ship Teddy Bear left Nome to retrieve the five people and to leave new colonists on Wrangel Island, but the ice pack was unusually thick and they were forced to turn back. Meanwhile the expedition eventually realized that a relief ship wasn’t coming and because game was not as plentiful during the second year, three of the men decided to attempt to cross the ice to Nome via Siberia. They left behind Knight, because he had scurvy, and Ada. Eventually Stefansson was able to find financial support to send another relief ship and they found Ada on August 20, 1923. Knight had died on June 23, 1923, and no sign was ever found of the other three men.

A newspaper clipping (Feb. 27, 1924) showing a photograph of Ada Blackjack and her son, and an excerpt from her Feb. 6, 1924, statement to U.S. Marshal E. R. Jordan, Nome’s chief of police, concerning the expedition can be found in the Inglis Fletcher Papers #21 (finding aid at Manuscript Collection 21). Inglis was a good friend of Stefansson and she befriended Ada in February 1924 and accompanied her on a trip to California from Seattle.

Excerpt from statement of Ada Blackjack to U.S. marshal E. R. Jordan.

Excerpt from statement of Ada Blackjack to U.S. marshal E. R. Jordan.

Click on the images to see enlarged versions.

ECTC News

Source: University Archives, SL2650/1/1

ECTC News

ECTC News

Staff Person: Suellyn Lathrop

Description:
ECTC News was the first student newspaper at East Carolina. It started as a two page stenciled newsletter issued twice a month beginning October 23, 1923, became a broadside printed on newsprint and ended as a multi-page newspaper on June 1, 1925. It was replaced in the fall by the Teco Echo a true college newspaper.

The main purpose of ECTC News was to keep the alumnae up to date on the happenings on campus and with each other. The first issue expressly focused on the changes and expansion in departments, buildings and faculty. Afterwards each issue contains updates on alumni, faculty, students and college activities.

Perhaps most interesting today is that the paper tells us about college activities pre-television. Recurring themes are YWCA and church activities, NC Education Association meetings, recitals, luncheons, practice teaching and the activities of the literary societies. Several times movies are mentioned. In February 1925 a special showing of Snow White was set up for the children from the Model School. While it may have been a simpler time, the faculty and students certainly maintained busy schedules.

The extant issues of ECTC News have been scanned and are available on-line at:

They are also available on microfilm in both the North Carolina Collection and in Special Collections. Due to the poor condition of the papers the originals are not pulled for patrons.

Click on the image itself to see an enlarged version.