Pvt. Victor C. Faure, WWI

Source: Victor C. Faure Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #1201

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

The letter is written by Pvt. Victor C. Faure to his parents, Henry E. Faure and Inge Peterson Faure, who live in San Francisco, California, describing his experiences during World War I.

From his letter above he describes Army life on Tuesday September 24, 1918, as continually on the move… near the front in France…never know where we will be next…we can hear the guns…don’t want to see corned beef again for about a year…

You will notice pages one and two have parts cut off, they probably were censored.

Other letters describe his participation with the First Army as part of the American Expeditionary Force

The Dave Brubeck Quartet

Source:  University Archives Photograph Collection, 55-01-5833

Staff Person:  Kacy Guill

Description:

In the Fall of 1957, the Student Government Association invited the Dave Brubeck Quartet to play at East Carolina College.  By the time the performance occurred in February 1958, Dave Brubeck’s bass player had been replaced by Eugene Wright.  Since he was African American, Eugene Wright was not permitted to play on stage at ECC, but required to perform from off stage.

In response, the Student Government Association petitioned ECC President John Messick for permission to invite any entertainment they chose without consideration of race.  The Board of Trustees granted permission.

Nuclear Age

 

Source: The Daily Reflector Image Collection East Carolina MC #741.28.f.45

Staff Person: Dale Sauter

Description:  Over seventy years ago, on December 2, 1942, the first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction was initiated. For more details, see the source link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_Pile-1
This week’s staff pick is a reminder of the public’s awareness and fear after the start of the nuclear age.

A. M. Handley journal

Source:   Handley, A. M., Journal, East Carolina Manuscript collection #1064.1.a

Staff Person: Ken Harbit

Description:

One of the great classics of American literature, and a treasure of world literature, Herman Melville’s novel Moby Dick was published for the first time on October 18, 1851. It tells the story of the sailor Ishmael and his adventures on the whaler Pequod, led by Captain Ahab who leads his crew on a hunt for the whale Moby-Dick.

You can read a first hand account about what shipboard life was like during Melville’s time, and probably the inspiration for much of his writing, in the A. M. Handley journal located in Joyner Library’s Digital Collections; call number 1064.1.a

'Tis the Season for Studying

741.5.d.34

Source:  Daily Reflector Negative Collection (#741.5.d.34)

Staff Person:  Jennifer Joyner

Description:

The month of December is always a busy time for college students. At East Carolina University, Joyner Library has been bustling around the clock with students finishing their coursework and preparing for exams. The same was true in December 1954, when this photograph was taken by a Daily Reflector photographer. Even though times have changed and the landscape of the library looks much different today, Joyner remains the place to study on campus. To see more photographs of Greenville’s past, be sure to check out the Daily Reflector Negative Collection, Manuscript Collection #741.

Juanita Worsley Williams

Source: East Carolina University Centennial Oral History Collection, 45-05-01-14:

Staff Person:  Lynette Lundin

Description:

Juanita Williams grew up in Rocky Mount, North Carolina she was one of 13 children. She graduated East Carolina Teachers College in 1932. She talks about her experiences during the depression and going to ECTC. This is one of 33 Centennial Oral Histories. You can find this in our digital collections at http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/1270

Fannie Wallace Letter to Mannie & Sissie Tuten 29 July 1863

Source: Arthur Whitford Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #18.1.a
Staff Person: Jonathan Dembo
Description: Letter from Fannie Wallace to Mannie and Sissie Tuten, 29 July 1863

Fannie Wallace Civil War Letter 29 July 1863

This little letter is from a young woman in Greensboro, North Carolina to her grandparents, Mannie and Sissie Tuten. It offers a glimpse into social life in the South during the crisis of the Civil War. Written less than a month after the Battle of Gettysburg (1-3 July) and the Fall of Vicksburg (4 July 1863) that ended any hope of Confederate victory, Fannie makes no mention of these disasters. Instead, she focuses on her family and social activities, her friends and her parties. She writes that her cousins are visiting and wishes they could be with them too. She passes on Nancie’s request for some snuff. Fannie knows there is a war on and that there are shortages. Indeed, she proclaims her patriotism: she is writing with Confederate ink on a Confederate spelling book and danced with two Confederate officers at a Ball. Either she did not understand the seriousness of the military situation, or, perhaps, more likely, did not wish to think about them or burden her grandparents with her worries.

Great American Cock, Male (Wild Turkey)

Source:  Rare QL674.A9 2006

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:

Study for the Great American Cock, Male one of the major plates in the large elephant folio edition of Birds of America by John James Audubon (1785-1851), artist, and William Home Lizars (1788-1859), engraving done around 1826, in Lousiana. Watercolor on paper, 37 ­x 25 1/2 inches. This print is from the New-York Historical Society edition of Audubon’s fifty best watercolors from the original watercolors preparatory for John James Audubon’s Birds of America, Chicago, Oppenheimer editions, ca. 2006.

Sadie Hawkins Day Race

Source:  University Archives Visual Materials Collection

Staff Person:  Arthur Carlson

Description: This photo from the University Archives shows East Carolina students participating in a 1953 Sadie Hawkins Day Race (UA55-01-4841). By tradition, on Sadie Hawkins Day girls ask boys to accompany them to a dance or on a date. The event originated in 1937 with the comic strip Li’l Abner when the town spinster, Sadie Hawkins, is sent in pursuit of the town’s eligible bachelors as they raced to avoid marriage to the “homeliest gal in the hills.”  The gender-based role reversal proved popular among female college students as Sadie Hawkins Day events rose in popularity across the nation. By 1952, Sadie Hawkins Day events were held in over 40,000 locations.  In this image, Fleming and Wilson Dormitories are on the right and the Old Cafeteria Complex is just visible on the left. The large building in the center rear is the original Austin classroom building.

UA55-01-4841

President Carter: FREE THE WILMINGTON 10

 

Wilmington 10 Demonstration Poster

President Carter: FREE THE WILMINGTON 10

Source:
North Carolina Collection  NoCar F265.N4 P74 1977

Staff Person:
Susan Holland

Description:
In October 1972, Ben Chavis along with nine other defendants were sentenced in the February 1971 firebombing of Mike’s Grocery in Wilmington, NC. The arson stemmed from long-standing frustration among African Americans due to the slow movement of school desegregation and other social reforms in the state. Known as the Wilmington 10, the group was perceived as political prisoners and were the subject of documentaries and news articles. Human rights groups including Amnesty International and the National Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression took up the cause to release the prisoners. In 1977, in response to President Carter administration’s accusations of Soviet Union human rights violations, the National Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression called for rallies in cities across the United States to free the Wilmington 10. In January 1978, North Carolina’s Governor Jim Hunt refused to pardon the prisoners, though he commuted their sentences. In 1980, a federal appeals court overturned the Wilmington 10’s conviction, and they were released. In May 2012, forty years after their conviction, the Wilmington 10 asked Governor Beverly Purdue for pardons.