Chinese Language Chart

Source: Lucy J. Webb Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #363

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

Miss Lucy J. Webb, arrived in Shanghai, China, in August of 1922. She worked as a Methodist missionary from 1922 to 1943 and from 1946 to 1951. Her memoir describes the labor done by the many missionaries in Shanghai during those years, with special attention to the work of Moore Memorial Church. This chart shows the difficulties of correct usage of tones in the Chinese language and how tone changes the meaning of words.

Caricature Made for U.S. Sailors Stationed in Pre-WWII China

Source:  William E. and Marion B. Stewart Papers (Manuscript Collection #707)

Staff Person:  Martha Elmore

Description:  U.S. Navy officer William E. Stewart and his wife Marion visited China and the Philippines in the late 1930s.  While there they took many photographs and bought other photographs which they collected into two albums–one for each country.  This image is a photograph of a caricature made for U.S. sailors stationed in China.  The photograph was taken by Hwa Sheng of Chefoo.  

                                                                                                                                                                              

Children in China

Source: Ola V. Lea Papers, (East Carolina Manuscript Collection #351)

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

Miss Ola Lea, was a native of Virginia and a Baptist missionary to China and Taiwan for thirty-seven years. In 1925 she accepted her assignment of teaching in China until the outbreak of World War II. These are photographs of children in China, in their padded winter garments.

Farewell to China

Source: James N. Joyner Papers (#429), East Carolina Manuscript Collection

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

James Noah Joyner was born in 1888. He attended the University of North Carolina, and was later employed by the British-American Tobacco Company (B.A.T.) in China from 1912 to 1935. He worked and traveled the whole time he was in China. He maintained close ties with his family in North Carolina and later managed the family farm. He became the division manager before coming home to North Carolina and died at the age of 83.

These photographs are of a farewell group in Nanking, China, (B.A.T.) managers, fellow employees and James Joyner before he returns to North Carolina.

Tobacco Advertising in China

Source: James N. Joyner Papers (Manuscript Collection #429)

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

James N. Joyner (1888-1972), attended the University of North Carolina and graduated in 1910. He was employed  by the British-American Tobacco Company (B.A.T.) in China from 1912 to 1935, returned to North Carolina to manage the family farm at LaGrange, and died at the age of 83.  His papers reveal many aspects of the operations of the B.A.T. Company and the social life during the 1920’s and 1930’s.

This is a photograph of a group of people advertising tobacco products during his time in China.

Chinese New Year, 1903

Letter of George Leland Dyer to Mrs. Dyer

Letter of George Leland Dyer to Mrs. Dyer

Source: Guide to the George Leland Dyer Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #340

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:

The Chinese New Year is one of that country’s most important holidays. It begins on the first day of the first lunar month, in late January or early February. In 1903, Commander George Leland Dyer, a U.S. naval officer, witnessed the Chinese New Year celebration in Shanghai. He described the celebration in a letter to his wife, dated January 31, 1903.

“We had a good look at Shanghai on an interesting occasion. It was the Chinese New Years and the streets were crowded with Chinese in gala dress. There was a continual passing of Chinese women in carriages of the hack variety and in rickshas. These people were all handsomely dressed in colored silks and were painted very perceptibly. Many women were also walking or stumping along on their deformed feet, all attended by women more plainly dressed. There were also many riders on the small ponies which seem to be in use. These were all Caucasians and men. I saw no ladies on horse back.”

Letter of George Leland Dyer to Mrs. Dyer

Letter of George Leland Dyer to Mrs. Dyer

Dyer was nearing the end of a long career in the Navy that had begun in 1870, when he was graduated with honors from the U. S. Naval Academy. His papers are a rich primary source for studying naval history. A finding aid for the George Leland Dyer Papers is available on the Special Collections Department’s website.

James Noah Joyner in China

Source: James N. Joyner Papers, 1923-1954, undated, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #429

Staff Person: Maury York

Masquerade party in China

Masquerade party in China

Description:

James Noah Joyner (1888-1972), the son of James Yadkin and Effie (Rouse) Joyner, worked for the British-American Tobacco Company in China from 1912 until 1935. Managing sales of cigarettes made by B.A.T., he traveled extensively and lived in several cities, including Changsha and Kiukiang. After resigning his position with B.A.T. he returned to his native state of North Carolina, where he operated the family farm near LaGrange. Joyner’s papers, which include correspondence, financial records, photographs and reports, reflect the nature of his work as a tobacconist and shed light on the social life he experienced among Occidentals in China. This undated photograph shows Joyner (fourth from left, standing in rear) at a masquerade party attended by friends and colleagues in China. The finding aid for the James N. Joyner Papers is located at Manuscript Collection #429

Click on the image above to see an enlarged version.

Portrait of Enfa Zhou Awaiting Execution, 1907

Source: Quentin Gregory Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #200

Photograph of Enfa Zhou, a Chinese bandit leader, 1907

Photograph of Enfa Zhou, a Chinese bandit leader, 1907

Staff Person: Jonathan Dembo

Description:

This is a photograph of Enfa Zhou, leader of a gang of Manchurian guerilla outlaws, prior to his execution by the Chinese Government, on 8 March 1907 [according to the Chinese lunar calendar]. The captions printed in Chinese characters on the photograph describe Zhou as a violent career criminal who had escaped several previous arrests and had roamed the Southern Manchurian countryside for many years during his criminal career. The board tied to Zhou’s back records his name and a list of his crimes and would have allowed witnesses to follow his public execution more easily. The wooden stocks binding his feet prevent a repetition of his previous escapes.

The image is from the Quentin Gregory Papers. Gregory, born on 4 February 1880, was a native of Halifax County, North Carolina. He attended Horner Military School in Oxford and was graduated from the University of North Carolina in 1902. He was then employed by the British-American Tobacco Company as one of its representatives in China from 1905 to 1920. Upon his return to Eastern North Carolina he served as president of the Bank of Halifax, from 1921 to about 1956, when he was made chairman of the board. In 1968, he retired from active business. The Gregory Papers include many such images of China during the early years of the 20th century and is representative of several dozen collections housed in the Special Collections Department that document the activities of American missionaries and businessmen working in China during that period.

I am indebted to Prof. Huanqing (Happy) Lu of ECU’s Department of Construction Management for his rough translation of the Chinese characters.

To view an enlarged version of the image, click on the image itself.

Pei-ching Chou Pao

Source: Beijing Review, Hoover DS 701 P42

Presidents of China and Cameroon

Presidents of China and Cameroon

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:
The Hoover collection receives a number of current periodicals that were especially of interest to Dr. Peele who established the collection. Beijing Review is a popular publication from mainland China that is similar in nature to Soviet Life a Russian magazine that was exchanged with the communist bloc countries as cultural materials during the cold war. In exchange for the distribution of US Information Agency publications in Communist countries, the mainland Chinese were allow to send similar type publications to America. Beijing Review is a relic of this type of Cold War information exchange. The Hoover collection has files dating back of 1979 of this title. The issue displayed here is typical of topics covered in the periodical. The Romanized title of the periodical is: Pei-ching chou pao.