Wilmington, North Carolina, Race Riot 1898

Source:  Alex L. Manly Papers Manuscript Collection #65

Staff Person:  Martha Elmore

Description:  Alexander L. Manly was born near Raleigh in 1866 and was the editor of an African American newspaper, the Wilmington Record, he  and his brother Frank owned in Wilmington, North Carolina. The brothers became the target of violence after publishing an editorial (written by Alex) in August 1898 that upset the white citizens of Wilmington.  Their printing offices were destroyed by a mob in November 10, 1898, but the brothers escaped due in large part to their light skin color.  At the time of the violence, Alex’s fiancée Caroline “Carrie” Sampson Sadgwar was performing in England with the Fisk Jubilee Singers.  After her return, they were married in Washington, D.C., and moved to Pennsylvania.  The document below is a typescript (done by their son Milo Manly) of a letter written by Carrie Manly to her sons Milo A. Manly and Lewin Manly. Typescripts of nine letters (1953-1955) written by her to her sons detailing the story of her life are in this collection.  In this January 14, 1954, letter she relates the story of the Wilmington Race Riot and her future husband’s escape to safety.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Source: J.C. Peele, M.D. Papers, ca. 1918-1987, undated, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #1030.25.g

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Staff Person: Nanette Hardison

Description:

The J.C. Peele, M.D. Papers (ca. 1918-1987, n.d.) is a manuscript collection that reflects the anti-communist sentiments of a physician in Kinston, N.C. This publication from the collection, dated May 1968, is a compilation of selected articles and documents pertaining to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s beliefs, ideals, and activities. Despite the booklet’s negative bias, the publication provides useful information and photos of Dr. King, his family, and the people who assisted him in his non-violent crusade for civil rights for all Americans.

Telegram from Lyndon B. Johnson to Capus M. Waynick July 1, 1964

Source: Capus Miller Waynick Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #421

Staff Person: Dale Sauter

Description:

Today, April 4th, 2008, marks the 40th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. In memory of King and his accomplishments, my pick today relates to Civil Rights history. Featured below is a telegram from President Lyndon B. Johnson to Capus M. Waynick. Johnson is asking Waynick to serve on the Community Relations Service, a committee created to help resolve racial disputes following the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. At the time, Waynick was serving as Race Relations “Troubleshooter” for North Carolina Governor Terry Sanford.

I have to admit I was not familiar with this committee. However, according to the following quote from Resolving Racial Conflict by Bertram J. Levine, the first written history of the Community Relations Service, this committee is not remembered by most of the general public today for good reason. “In 1964, when the Civil Rights Act was passed, Congress wisely created an agency based in the U.S. Department of Justice to help forestall or resolve racial or ethnic disputes evolving from the act. Mandated by law and by its own methodology to shun publicity, Community Relations Service developed self-effacement to a fine art. Thus the accomplishments, as well as the shortcomings, of this federal venture into conflict resolution are barely known in official Washington, and even less so by the American public”. For more on Bertram’s book, including some “sneak-preview” pages, follow this link. http://books.google.com/books?id=iYMOU0enPNEC&dg=%22national+citizens+committee+for+community+relations%22&source=gbs_summary_s&cad=0

For more information on the Waynick Papers or any other collections we hold, please contact us for further details.

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Telegram from Lyndon B. Johnson to Capus M. Waynick

Telegram from Lyndon B. Johnson to Capus M. Waynick

Telegram from Lyndon B. Johnson to Capus M. Waynick

Telegram from Lyndon B. Johnson to Capus M. Waynick

Telegram from Lyndon B. Johnson to Capus M. Waynick

Telegram from Lyndon B. Johnson to Capus M. Waynick