St. James Episcopal Church, Kittrell, NC

Source: Augustus Moore Family Papers (ECU Manuscript Collections #1216)

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

St. James Episcopal Church was built in a Gothic-Style, the church is located in Kittrell, NC.

A Confederate Hospital was located in Kittrell during the  Civil War and the church saw  to the patients needs and provided Christian burials for the 52 soldiers who died there. PC-1216.13.a.1

Fannie Wallace Letter to Mannie & Sissie Tuten 29 July 1863

Source: Arthur Whitford Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #18.1.a
Staff Person: Jonathan Dembo
Description: Letter from Fannie Wallace to Mannie and Sissie Tuten, 29 July 1863

Fannie Wallace Civil War Letter 29 July 1863

This little letter is from a young woman in Greensboro, North Carolina to her grandparents, Mannie and Sissie Tuten. It offers a glimpse into social life in the South during the crisis of the Civil War. Written less than a month after the Battle of Gettysburg (1-3 July) and the Fall of Vicksburg (4 July 1863) that ended any hope of Confederate victory, Fannie makes no mention of these disasters. Instead, she focuses on her family and social activities, her friends and her parties. She writes that her cousins are visiting and wishes they could be with them too. She passes on Nancie’s request for some snuff. Fannie knows there is a war on and that there are shortages. Indeed, she proclaims her patriotism: she is writing with Confederate ink on a Confederate spelling book and danced with two Confederate officers at a Ball. Either she did not understand the seriousness of the military situation, or, perhaps, more likely, did not wish to think about them or burden her grandparents with her worries.

Missouri State Pension for Ex-Confederate Soldiers

Source: Carl Woodrow Thurman, Jr. Collection #15.1.a
Staff Person: Jonathan Dembo


Description: James T. Thurman, aged 72, and still suffering from a Civil War wound to his thigh, “weak lungs” and a “chronic cough”, submitted this pension application, on 18 June 1913, to the Adjutant General’s Office, in Jefferson City, Missouri. After a long life of physical labor, he could do no more.  His physical condition, he said, made it impossible for him “to do manual labor” any more and he needed financial assistance. Like many Confederate soldiers, Thurman was illiterate and required the assistance of Notary Public Hemmit Dale to complete the application form. His “mark” is visible between the J. and T. of his “signature.” The application is marked “approved & service papers returned” and dated 9 July 1913. Thurman’s pension application is accompanied by two documents: a “Memorandum of Service” and an Adjutant General’s certificate authenticating his Civil War service. The documents indicate that Thurman was a resident of Bloomington, Macon County, Missouri and had enlisted as a private in Company B, 5th Missouri Regiment Infantry Volunteers in Springfield, Missouri, on 11 January 1862. Thurman had previously served in Company F, 4th Regiment, 3rd Division of the Missouri National Guard.

The document may be more significant for what is doesn’t say.  It doesn’t say how Thurman served honorably throughout the war until he was paroled after the surrender in April 1865. The 5th Regiment, under the command of Col. James McCown, Lt. Col. Robert S. Bevier, and Maj. Owen A. Waddell, was involved in nearly continuous combat during the war. It fought at Iuka (19 Sept. 1862) and Corinth, Mississippi (3-4 Oct. 1862), Lexington, Tennessee (18 Dec. 1862) and at Pea Ridge [Elkhorn Tavern] Arkansas (7-8 Mar. 1862), where it was part of Brig. Gen. John S. Bowen’s command. Thurman got his thigh wound from a shell fragment at Pea Ridge. It participated in the  simultaneous battles of Grand Gulf (29 April, 3 May 1863) and Port Gibson, Mississippi (30 April – 1 May 1863) while defending Vicksburg.  A few weeks later the regiment fought at Champion’s Hall, also known as Baker’s Creek (16 May 1863).  The 5th was captured en masse, on 4 July 1863, when Vicksburg fell to Gen. Ulysses S. Grant’s forces and spent several months as prisoners of war.  The harshness of the siege and subsequent captivity can only be guessed.  Gen. Bowen never recovered from the effects and died on 13 July 1863. After an exchange of prisoners, the understrength 5th joined Brig. Gen. Francis M. Cockrell’s Brigade and was consolidated with the 3rd Regiment, and served with General John Bell Hood’s army in Tennessee (Nov. 1864-Jan. 1865) and during the Atlanta Campaign (1 May – 8 Sept. 1864) where it fought at Allatoona (5 Oct. 1864).  Transferred to  to the defense of Mobile (17 Mar. – 12 April 1865) it participated in the Battle of Fort Blakely, Alabama (1-9 April 1865).

The 5th, which mustered 476 men in May 1862, suffered staggering casualties during the war. It lost 6 killed, 62 wounded, and 19 missing at Corinth; 4 killed, 49 wounded and 37 missing at Champion’s Hill;  20 killed and 52 wounded during the siege of Vicksburg; the combined 5th/3rd Regiment lost a total of 128 casualties (killed and wounded) during the Atlanta Campaign (18 May – 5 September 1864) alone. It lost hundreds more by disease and desertion. By the end of the war there were few left to surrender.  The survivors of the bloodbath, including James T. Thurman, then faded from history.

Confederate States of America $100 Bond

Source: William Moore Family Papers (Manuscript Collection #596)

Staff Person: Martha Elmore

Description: As often happens in time of war,  the Confederate States of America helped to finance the expenses incurred in the Civil War by issuing bonds.  In this example, a $100 bond is issued on March 2, 1863 (in compliance with the February 20, 1863, Act passed by the Congress of the Confederate States), and is eligible to be paid in full with 7% interest on July 1, 1868.  The certificates at the bottom could be turned in separately to receive increments of the interest payments instead of waiting until July 1, 1868, to receive all of the interest.  The coupons are dated as to when they can be used.  The first coupon would allow the bearer to receive $2.92 for interest due January 1, 1864.  This bond resides with papers related to the William Moore family of Greene and Pitt counties, N.C.

Photograph of Confederate veterans and daughter

Taft Family Papers #784, East Carolina Manuscript Collection

Source:

Staff Person:  Dale Sauter

Description:  

Today’s staff pick features an undated photograph (left to right) of Major Orren Randolph Smith, his daughter Jessica and John T. B. Hoover. Smith and Hoover were both Confederate veterans who fought in the Civil War.  On the back of the photograph a statement is written that Smith created the “Stars and Bars” (the first official flag of the Confederacy), and that his daughter verified this in the 1940s.  However, it is also believed that Nicola Marschall (a Prussian artist), inspired by the Austrian flag, first designed the Confederate flag.  There became much conflict between the descendants of the two individuals regarding who was the first to design the flag.  Nevertheless, Smith’s tombstone in Henderson, North Carolina bears the inscription “designer of the Stars and Bars”.

U. S. Army Provost Marshal’s Office Pass No. 11382 (1863)

Source: Shirley Kilpatrick Collection #10.1.d.

Staff Person: Jonathan Dembo

Description: U. S. Army Provost Marshal’s Office Pass No. 11382 was issued in Union-occupied New Orleans on 4 February 1863.  It allowed John A. Miltz of New Orleans to travel from New Orleans to New York on the Steamer EMPIRE CITY.  It is accompanied by Miltz’s oath of allegiance as a U. S. citizen dated 8 October 1862 and his certificate of citizenship filed in a New York court on 12 October 1868.   A search of both Confederate and Union Civil War records has revealed a tale of complex and divided loyalties.   John A. Miltz, it seems, served in both Confederate and Union units in Louisiana during the Civil War.  The records even reveal the possibility that Miltz may have been serving on both sides at the same time.   John Miltz enlisted first on the Confederate side in Company B, of the 4th Louisiana Infantry on 25 May 1861.   However, he was also listed as serving as a private in Company I of the Chalmette Regiment, Louisiana Militia, between March and May of 1862 when he might have been on leave from the 4th Louisiana Infantry.   He was again serving with the 4th Louisiana Infantry when he was captured at Baton Rouge, Louisisan on 5 August 1862 and appears on a list of Confederate prisoners held on the U. S.  prison ship ALGERINE on 5 October 1862.  After signing his oath of citizenship, on 8 October 1862, he was apparently released.  However, it appears that he then reenlisted as John Metz, again on the Confederate side  but this time in  Company F of the 20th Louisiana Infantry Regiment.  This unit had been formed in February 1862 but in December of 1862 it was consolidated with the 13th Regiment due to severe losses it suffered at the Battle of Shiloh.  It then suffered very heavy casualties at the Battle of Chickamauga and by December 1863 had lost 43% of its strength.  Whether because of the hard fighting or some other reasons, Miltz then left the 13/20th soon after.  It was at this point that he obtained his pass to leave New Orleans and travel to New York.   By October 1864, however, he had returned to Louisiana and had enlisted on the Union side in the 1st Louisiana Cavalry Regiment.  He served in Companies E., C. & H. under a variety of names, including John Maltz, John Matz, John Meltz, or John Metz (but not John Miltz).  He then appears on the roster of the 2nd Louisiana Cavalry Regiment (Union), which was organized in New Orleans in November 1863.  He again registered variously as John Maltz, John Matz, John Meltz, or John Metz.  Starting as a private he eventually gained promotion to corporal.  Apparently, he enjoyed his service with the Union forces better than he had the Confederate side for after the war he returned to New York where he obtained his U. S. Citizenship.  How these documents found their way into the Kilpatrick Collection remains a mystery.

Tax Receipts from the Government of the Confederate States

Source: Elias Carr Papers, 1856-1910, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #160

Tax Receipt

Tax Receipt

Staff Person: Brian Johnson

Description:

The receipts shown here are from taxes paid to the Government of the Confederate States in accordance with the provisions of the Act of Congress, “to lay taxes for the common defense, and carry on the Government of the Confederate States.”

These and many similar documents can be found in the Elias Carr Papers in the Special Collections Department at Joyner Library.

http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/special/ead/findingaids/0160

Elias Carr was Democratic governor of North Carolina (1893-1897), president of the N.C. State Farmers’ Alliance and Industrial Union (1889-1892), member of the board of directors of Rocky Mount Mills, trustee of N.C. College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts, commissioner of the N.C. Geological Survey, agriculturalist, and businessman. Born February 25, 1839, he was the son of Jonas Johnston Carr and Elizabeth Jane Hilliard Carr. He was orphaned at the age of four and was reared under the guardianship of John Buxton Williams of Warren County, N.C. He attended the University of North Carolina (1855-1857) and returned to his father’s farm, Bracebridge Hall (Edgecombe County, N.C.), where he purchased his brother’s interest. He married Eleanor Kearny in 1859 and was the father of six children: William Kearny Carr, John Buxton Carr, Mary Elizabeth Carr, Elias Carr, Eleanor Kearny Carr, and Annie Bruce Carr. Active in the farmers’ movements of the 1880s, he represented N.C. in the Farmers’ National Congress in St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1886; provided leadership in the founding of the Farmers’ Alliance in N.C.; and represented N.C. at the Ocala, Florida, Farmers’ Alliance Convention (1890). He was nominated by the Democratic Party for governor in 1892 and defeated the Republican candidate, Judge David M. Furches, and the Populist candidate, Dr. Wyatt P. Exum. Carr was also a commissioner to the World’s Columbian Exposition at Chicago in 1893. After his governorship, he returned to Bracebridge Hall. He died July 22, 1900.

Tax Receipt

Tax Receipt

Click on the images to see enlarged versions.

United Confederate Veterans Song Book

Source: Richard Porson Paddison Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #327

Staff Person: Brian Johnson

Description:

The first image below is that of the cover of a songbook titled United Confederate Veterans Song Book, ca. 1890-1900, which contains many songs relating to the southern states prior to, during and after the Civil War. The second image is that of the first song in the book, “Old North State,” North Carolina’s state song. This and many other interesting books and pamphlets, as well as numerous letters written during the Civil War can be found in the Richard Porson Paddison Papers in the Special Collections Department at Joyner Library. http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/special/ead/findingaids/0327/

Richard Porson Paddison, lived in Virginia and Boston, Massachusetts, and finally returned to the South, taking up residence in North Carolina in 1860. Paddison moved to Point Caswell in Pender County, N.C., after the Civil War, where he operated steamboats on Black and Cape Fear rivers. Paddison lived at Point Caswell for the reminder of his life except for the years 1886-1897, when he resided in Titusville, Florida.

United Confederate Veterans Song Book, ca. 1890-1900

United Confederate Veterans Song Book, ca. 1890-1900

United Confederate Veterans Song Book, ca. 1890-1900

United Confederate Veterans Song Book, ca. 1890-1900

Sparrow Warren Civil War Letter

Source: Guide to the Thomas Sparrow Papers, 1819-1872, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #1

Staff Person: Brian Johnson

Description:

The image below is correspondence written to Captain Thomas Sparrow of the Washington Grays by Dr. E. Warren on July 8, 1861. It is possible that Captain Sparrow never received the letter as he was imprisoned by Union forces in August of the same year.

Transcription:

Portsmouth July 8, ’61

Dear Sir,

It is my duty to inform you that the measles is prevailing to a considerable extent among the members of the Hyde County Company. It is not in my power to so adopt the proper measures to prevent it from spreading among the troops stationed here, and I therefore urge upon you the importance of doing something to protect the men belonging to your company from the disease.

Very respectfully,

Edward Warren MD

Surgeon

Thomas Sparrow (1819-1884) was a Washington, N.C., lawyer until the outbreak of the Civil War. He was commissioned a captain in the Confederate Army in 1861 and served at Fort Hatteras until he was taken prisoner by Union forces in August of that year. After the war he returned to Washington and represented Beautfort County in the North Carolina General Assembly in 1870 and 1881.

This correspondence and much more can be found in the finding aid of the Thomas Sparrow Papers which can be accessed at Manuscript Collection 1

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.

Letter from Dr. E. Warren to Captain Thomas Sparrow, July 8th, 1861

Letter from Dr. E. Warren to Captain Thomas Sparrow, July 8th, 1861

Letter from Dr. E. Warren to Captain Thomas Sparrow, July 8th, 1861

Letter from Dr. E. Warren to Captain Thomas Sparrow, July 8th, 1861

Old Money

Source: Sallie Joyner Davis Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #133

Twenty shillings

Twenty shillings

Staff Person: Brian Johnson

Description:
This image is from a collection that contains a letter (1916) from Colonel Fred A. Olds of the North Carolina Historical Commission to Miss Sallie Joyner Davis in which he proposes that East Carolina develop a historical collection. In order to encourage the collection, Colonel Olds enclosed a quantity of currency, including colonial proclamation money (1754, 1768, 1771), Revolutionary War currency (1780), and a variety of Civil War money.

Miss Sallie Joyner Davis (1871-1954) was a charter member of the faculty of East Carolina Teachers Training School. A native of Wayne County, she was a niece of Dr. J. Y. Joyner and a descendant of colonial printer James Davis (see 1780 currency). Miss Davis graduated from U.N.C.-Greensboro and pursued graduate study at the University of Pennsylvania, Duke University, and the University of California. She taught history at East Carolina University from 1909 to 1945. (During this time period the university was known as East Carolina Teachers Training School and East Carolina Teachers College).

The finding aid for this collection can be found at: Manuscript Collection 133

Fifty dollars

Fifty dollars

Five pounds

Five pounds

Ten Shillings

Ten Shillings

One dollar

One dollar

Confederate ten dollar bill

Confederate ten dollar bill

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.