St. James Episcopal Church, Kittrell, NC

Source: Augustus Moore Family Papers (ECU Manuscript Collections #1216)

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

St. James Episcopal Church was built in a Gothic-Style, the church is located in Kittrell, NC.

A Confederate Hospital was located in Kittrell during the  Civil War and the church saw  to the patients needs and provided Christian burials for the 52 soldiers who died there. PC-1216.13.a.1

Esther, The Beautiful Queen

Source: Victoria Louise Pendleton Memoir (Manuscript Collection #17.1.b)

Staff Person: Jonathan Dembo

The program above, advertising a performance of Esther, The Beautiful Queen, to be presented at the Warrenton, North Carolina Town Hall on 11 October 1894, is from the Victoria Louise Pendleton Memoir manuscript collection. Mrs. Pendleton was born in October 1837, in Pitt County, North Carolina and attended school in Greenville as a girl. After graduating from high school, she married Robert Leckie Jones of Mecklenburg County, Virginia, in 1854. He died less than a year later, leaving her with a young daughter, Helen. After the Civil War Mrs. Jones moved to Warrenton. She taught school for a while at the Wilcox School and at Warrenton College. Later, she and Mrs. S. D. Twitty, established a private school for girls in her house.  Each year, as she recounts in her memoir, the students in her schools produced an artistic or musical performance for the public.  The program, above, is the only example in her collection.

In 1872, Mrs. Jones married Major Arthur S. Pendleton, of Portsmouth, Virginia, a veteran of the Civil War. The couple, who resided in Warrenton, had two sons, Milo W. Pendleton, who died young, and Col. Arthur Pendleton, who later married Miss Sara Busbee, and in whose home Mrs. Pendleton lived her declining years. Mrs. Pendleton remained active throughout her life until only a few weeks prior to her death when she suffered a stroke.  At the time of her death, on 9 April 1931 at age 93, she was the oldest person in Warrenton.  Her funeral was attended by nearly the entire population of the community.

In addition to her teaching activities Mrs. Pendleton was also active in a wide variety of patriotic, civic, and religious organizations. She taught Sunday School for 70 consecutive years and was active in the local chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy.  She served as the UDC’s representative at the unveiling of the Robert E. Lee statue at Stone Mountain, Georgia, in 1925.  Mrs. Pendleton’s photocopied memoir contains far more than a biographical account of her life. It also includes historical accounts of Warrenton and Warren County, its notable schools, churches, buildings and family homes.  It features short biographical sketches of major military figures who visited and played a part in Warrenton’s history, including Confederate generals Robert E. Lee, Fitzhugh Lee, Joseph E. Johnston, Edward C. Walthall, Wade Hampton, Matt W. Ransom, Robert Ransom and Confederate spy Rose O’Neal Greenhow;  political figures including  Dr. Charles D. McIver, and Gov. Charles B. Aycock,  Among the histories of schools in Warrenton, are those of Warrenton Male Academy, Mordecai School, Falkner School, Miss Hannah Lee’s School, Miss Harriet Allen’s School, and many more.  Mrs. Pendleton also recounts histories of all the churches of Warrenton, including the Episcopal, Methodist, Presbyterian and Baptist churches.  She provides brief histories of nearly two dozen private homes and other buildings in Warrenton, including the home of Thomas Howard Payne (author of “Home Sweet Home”), the Brick Spring House (home of Nathaniel Macon), and the Henry A. Boyd House.  These brief handwritten accounts, written in a straightforward yet sprightly style, are legible and almost as easy to read as the original.

Main Street in Windsor, N.C., 1910

Source:  Grady T. Davis, Sr. Papers (Manuscript Collection #1187)

Staff Person:  Martha Elmore

Description:  This photograph of Main Street, looking north, in Windsor, N.C., is one of eight photographs (size 8″ x 6″) mounted on cardboard taken of Windsor street scenes, buildings, and the Confederate Monument around 1910.  The photographer is unknown, but the photographs were probably taken for Grady T. Davis, Sr., of Windsor.

                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Blount-Harvey Department Store

Source: Daily Reflector Negative Collection (#741)

Staff Person: Maury York

Description: This view of the Blount-Harvey department store, located on the northwest corner of Evans and Fourth Streets in downtown Greenville, was taken in 1956. The store, which moved to this building in 1923, featured a wide variety of clothing and dry goods. An extensive renovation project undertaken between 1956 and 1958 completely obscured this facade. The store closed in 1985 and sat vacant for many years. The Glenn family restored the building to its original appearance in 2005 and moved its retail business, Jefferson’s, to it the following year. The tower of the Memorial Baptist Church, subsequently demolished, can be seen in the distance.

City of Greenville, North Carolina

Source: Junius D. Grimes Papers (#571)

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

Take a step back in time to 1914 Greenville, N. C., in this C. E. Weaver Series, “Illustrated Cities”, by Central Publishing Co., Inc., in Richmond, Virginia. Greenville was growing and changing: The Center Brick Warehouse was selling Bright Leaf Tobacco (93,762 pounds avg. at $24.55 per hundred). The Flanagan Buggy Co. distributed products throughout Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, Florida and Alabama. The Greenville Ice and Coal Co. was a necessity for this community. The R.L. Smith Stables sold and exchanged horses and mules. The East Carolina Teachers Training School is now called East Carolina University; the campus consisted of the Power House, Dining Hall, Infirmary, Dormitories and the Administration Building and the soon to be erected library, gymnasium and the President’s Residence. These are just a few highlights from the pamphlet from the Junius D. Grimes Papers #571.

Shoveling snow in Greenville, 1958

Source: Daily Reflector Negative Collection, Manuscript Collection #741

Staff Person: Maury York

Description: A photographer for the Daily Reflector, Greenville, N.C., captured this view in December 1958 of a man removing snow from the marquee of the State Theatre on West Fifth Street. Note the State Bank Building, a four-story, triangular building, at right.

Photograph of “Hilma,” the home of John L. Bridgers, Jr., Tarboro, N.C.

Source: John L. Bridgers Family Papers, 727.1.c.8

Staff Person: Maury York

Description: This ornate house belonged to John Luther Bridgers, Jr. (1850-1932). It was located adjacent to what is now West Wilson Street in Tarboro, North Carolina. Bridgers is perhaps best known for his collaboration with Joseph Kelly Turner on a history of Edgecombe County, N.C., which was published in 1920 by Edwards & Broughton.  The John L. Bridgers Family Papers contains additional photographs, including views of the family, farm buildings, and livestock.

New Bern, North Carolina, 1908 Post Card

Source: Tabitha Marie DeVisconti Papers #480

Staff Person: Martha Elmore

Description: New Bern was founded in 1710 and is North Carolina’s second oldest town.  This post card, bearing a 1908 postmark, depicts a downtown view of New Bern including Christ Episcopal Church, the Courthouse, Centenary Methodist Episcopal Church, the Post Office and the First Baptist Church.

Pitt County Courthouse, ca. 1900

Source: Moore Family Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #275

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:

Pitt County court house, Greenville, N.C.

Pitt County court house, Greenville, N.C.

This postcard depicts the Pitt County Courthouse prior to its destruction by fire in 1910. Located on the site of the present courthouse (Third and Evans streets in Greenville), the building was designed by Dabney Cosby (1779-1862), who apparently moved to Greenville to undertake the project. He is listed in the 1860 census as an eighty-two-year-old architect. According to the Chronicles of Pitt County (1982), the building was begun in 1858 to replace the previous courthouse, which had burned, but was not completed until 1878. This postcard is from the Moore Family Papers in the East Carolina Manuscript Collection.

National Bank Building, Greenville, N.C.

Source: Tabitha Marie DeVisconti Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #480

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:

National Bank Building, Greenville, N.C.

National Bank Building, Greenville, N.C.

National Bank Building, Greenville, N.C. This post card depicts the National Bank Building, which was constructed between 1911 and 1916 by the firm of Higgs, Hardee, and Laughinghouse at Five Points in Greenville. Five Points was the intersection of Fifth Street, Evans Street, and Dickinson Avenue. In addition to the bank, the triangular-shaped structure in 1916 housed offices, a barber, and a dry goods business. In later years, the bank was known as the State Bank. The structure was demolished in the 1970s by the Redevelopment Commission and the street pattern was radically altered as part of Greenville’s ambitious urban renewal program. The post card can be found in the Tabitha Marie DeVisconti Papers http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/special/ead/findingaids/0480/ in the East Carolina Manuscript Collection. Records concerning the management of the National Bank Building in the 1910s and 1920s are available in the Charles O’Hagan Laughinghouse Papers. http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/special/ead/findingaids/0270/

National Bank Building, Greenville, N.C.

National Bank Building, Greenville, N.C.