Virginiae partiis australis, et Floridae partis orientalis, interjacentiumq[ue] regionum nova description

Source: Virginiae partis australis, et Floridae partis orientalis, interjacentiumq[ue] regionum nova description, by Willem Janszoon Blaeu, Amsterdam, J. and C. Blaeu, 1640; Special Collections Map Collection #2.3

Virginiae partis australis, et Floridae partis orientalis, interjacentiumq[ue] regionum nova descriptio.. by Willem Janszoon Blaeu

Virginiae partis australis, et Floridae partis orientalis, interjacentiumque regionum nova descriptio.. by Willem Janszoon Blaeu

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:

This map, part of Blaeu’s Le Thé&acirctre dv Monde, ou Novvel Atlas (Amsterdami, 1638, II 1640) plate 28-29, is based on the 1606 Hondius map, but according to William E. Cumming, “incorporates new geographical knowledge.” Specifically the 1640 map shows South Carolina more accurately and changes the shape of the Chesapeake Bay “from a small bay to its proper shape.” This is the first time Jamestown and many local Virginia Indian villages are shown on European maps. The more correct latitude of “Coft Feare” [Cape Fear] at 34° North replaces the incorrect 32° North shown by Hondius on his earlier map. The North Carolina sounds, especially Pamlico, have additional information collected by English explorers. Some of these new names were not retained in later usage, but the map demonstrates that European readers were interested in the latest information from the new world. A “P. Grinfeld” [Port Grenville] is noted as being perhaps near the current location of New Bern in Pamlico Sound. Cummingts further notes that “this [map] is the most correct map of this area yet to appear,” and was a key representation of the Carolinas through the end of the 17th century. Students of cartography often compare this map with the depiction of the North Carolina coast shown on the 1733 Moseley Map.

Special Collections Map Collection #MC0002.003 [Currently framed and on display in the Rare Book Room]

Foy Land Record

Source: Robert Lee Foy Manuscript Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection

Diagram of land surveyed for Thomas Foy

Diagram of land surveyed for Thomas Foy

Staff Person: Brian Johnson

Description:
The diagram below exhibits a plan of One Hundred & Sixty Six Acres of Land for Thos. Eubank (from Thos. Foy) Beginning at a Pine Pollock’s Corner & runs South 30 W 92 poles to a White Oak, (Foy’s beginning) thence South 75 E 100 poles to a Black Jack in Foy’s old line, thence No. 15 E. 140 poles to a Pine, thence No. 60 W. 100 poles, thence to the Beginning.

Chas. Markland, Surveyor.

This diagram is not dated, but Thomas Foy was living in Craven County in 1766. His will was dated 8 January 1788, Probated, December Term 1789.

The Foy family settled in southeastern North Carolina prior to the American Revolution, and James Foy, Jr., purchased Poplar Grove Plantation at Scott’s Hill in 1795. Poplar Grove was owned originally by Cornelius Harnett and his colonial mill site is still visible on the plantation. The present Foy home was built by Joseph Montford Foy around 1850 and is now owned by his grandson, Robert Lee Foy, Sr.

This document and others can be found in the Robert Lee Foy Collection #32 in the East Carolina Manuscript Collection

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.