Nursing staff out on the Yukon

Source: Lula M. Disosway Papers, 1897-1977  (E C Manuscript collection #447)

Staff Member: Nanette Hardison

Lula Disosway was a native North Carolinian (born in New Bern) who became both a doctor and a surgeon (a remarkable accomplishment for a woman at that time) and who used her medical knowledge to serve as a medical missionary for the Episcopal Church. Her missionary work took her to places like Shanghai, China but when World War II loomed ahead in 1941, she was transferred to the Hudson Stuck Memorial Hospital located in Fort Yukon, Alaska. There, she served as both administrator and physician to the hospital and at certain times, she was even the hospital cook! Dr. Disosway’s papers have great historical value for among her papers are letters that give details of life in the Arctic Circle and of the challenges and problems she faced during her time at the hospital. The papers also have numerous photographs that show the staff of the Hudson Stuck Memorial Hospital. If you would like to look through this interesting collection, come to the Manuscripts and Rare Books Department on the 4th floor where the collection is housed.

Original, signed letter from Caleb (C. D.) Bradham, Sr., inventor of Pepsi-Cola

Source: Minges Collection #1136.1.a

Staff Person: Dale Sauter

Description: Original, signed letter from Caleb (C. D.) Bradham, Sr., inventor of Pepsi-Cola, to Dr. Jos. J. Watson in South Carolina promoting Pepsi-Cola as a safe drink.  Bradham also mentions some basic ingredients found in the beverage (1917).

Advertising Pamphlet for Keeley Institute, Greensboro, N.C.

Source: Edward Merritt McEachern, Jr., Collection  #25.2.c

Staff Person:  Martha Elmore

Description:  The Keeley Institute in Greensboro, N.C., was established circa 1891 and it survived until 1961.  From 1906 on the Institute operated at Blandwood, the former home of N.C. Governor John Motley Morehead.  The Greensboro location was just one of over more than 200 branches of the original Keeley Institute founded in 1879 in Dwight, Illinois, for the purpose of administering the Keeley Cure to alcoholics. [Source: Wikipedia and Preservation Greensboro Incorporated]    

This undated pamphlet illustrates the before and after caricatures of an alcoholic who takes the cure at the Keeley Institute in Greensboro, N.C.  The top half of the pamphlet opens up to reveal the cured patient.  For a related collection, see the William H. Osborn Papers Manuscript Collection #41. Col. Osborn owned the Keeley Institute in Greensboro for many years.

1918 Flu Pandemic nickname “Spanish Flu”, March 1918 to June 1920

Source: University Archives

ECTTS Board of Trustees Minute Book 1

ECTTS Board of Trustees Minute Book 1

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

Health conditions at ECTTC are one of the major topics mentioned in the Board of Trustees minutes from 1918. There were 141 cases of the Spanish flu recorded on campus, but there was no record of serious complications. Worldwide this was not the same. This flu epidemic was called “the greatest medical holocaust in history.” The pandemic infected one third of the world’s population, and most of its victims were young healthy adults. Normally influenza attacks the weakest population, namely infants and the elderly. The images shown below are two documents from the ECTTC Board of Trustees Minutes Book 1, November 15, 1918 which is in the University Archives.

William S. W. Ruschenberger, Journal (1848)

Source: William S. W. Ruschenberger Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #629

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

William S. W. Ruschenberger served in the U.S. Medical Corps from 1826 until 1869. His first ship was the U.S. frigate BRANDYWINE (1826-1829), which sailed to many ports in South America. He was aboard the USS PEACOCK from 1831 until 1832 and again in 1835-1837, this time traveling around the world. He was fleet surgeon on the USS PLYMOUTH for the East India Squadron (1847-1849). After shore duty from 1850 to 1854, he was appointed to the Pacific Squadron (1854-1857) and served on the U.S.S. INDEPENDENCE, which traveled to Chile, Hawaii, and Panama. Ruschenberger was in the Mediterranean Squadron from 1860 to 1861. He was chief surgeon for the Boston Navy Yard throughout the Civil War. He retired with the rank of commodore in 1869.

Ruschenberger wrote several books, including A Voyage Round the World (1838) and Elements of Natural History (1850).

These excerpts from his 1848 journal mention a flogging (April 12), a court-martial (May 12), and a recipe for mosquito repellent (May 22). You can view the journal in its entirety through Joyner Library Digital Collections.

William S. W. Ruschenberger, Journal (1848)

William S. W. Ruschenberger, Journal (1848)

Pitt Community Hospital, Greenville, NC

Source: Frank Wooten Jr, Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #126
David A. Norris Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #687

Pitt Community Hospital, Greenville, N.C.

Pitt Community Hospital, Greenville, N.C.

Staff Person: Coleen Allen

Description:

The white building was Greenville’s original hospital know as Pitt Community Hospital, and was located on Johnston Street, parallel to East Fourth St. When the hospital opened in 1924, it had 42 acute-care beds.

The red brick building below, know as Pitt Memorial Hospital, was located on West Fifth Street and was built in the early 1950s. Later, an 80 bed addition raised the total capacity to 220 beds.

Today Pitt County Memorial Hospital is a 755 bed tertiary academic medical center that provides a comprehensive range of primary, secondary and tertiary medical services to residents of 29 counties in eastern North Carolina. During fiscal year 2006, PCMH set records in several different areas: Inpatient admissions: 36,983; Average inpatient census: 617; Operating room cases: 20, 411; Births: 3,882 and Emergency department visits: 55,354.

Is this progress?

Click on the images to see enlarged versions.

Pitt Memorial Hospital, Greenville, North Carolina

Pitt Memorial Hospital, Greenville, North Carolina