Annual Register

Source: Annual Register, or a View of the History, Politicks and Literature of the Year, Rare Book Collection #D 2 A7

Title page of the Annual Register, or a View of the History, Politicks and Literature of the Year 1758

Title page of the Annual Register, or a View of the History, Politicks and Literature of the Year 1758

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:

Annual Register, or a View of the History, Politicks and Literature of the Year…, was printed by James and Robert Dodsley and edited by Edmund Burke (1729-1797) a Whig statesman, political theorist, and philosopher. The first volume came in 1758. Burke is remembered primarily for his A Vindication of Natural Society (1756) and his opposition to the French Revolution. The Register is an important historical reference work and is an annual review of the year’s major events, developments, and views of world events. It was an early forerunner of modern works like the World Almanac. In the Annual Register the editor has selected essays or articles describing important events in sports, arts, religion, science, law, history, politics, government, and the environment that happened during the past year. Obituaries, book reviews, book digests, letters and selected documents are also included. For example, the 1758 volume (the first year) contains a lengthy account of a fire on board H.M.S. Prince George, off Lisbon. A midshipman writes of the fire, “Such a terrible fight the oldest men of the fleet say they never saw,” as the crew struggled to save the vessel. Of the ship’s complement of 745, only 260 were saved by crews of the H.M.S. Glasgow and Alderney. A Rev. Sharpe on the Prince George noted that more might have been saved by the crew of the Alderney, had not the crew also been so “employed in saving geese, fowls, tables, chairs, and whatever else of the kind [that] came near them.”

The Annual Register is still published today by ProQuest. The Rare Book Collection in Special Collections has a set that runs from 1758 to 1825. Most of the volumes have been rebound in library buckram, but one year, 1784, is in the original binding. This volume has the bookplate of the Rev. Alexander Scott, who was chaplain to Vice Admiral Horation Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson, 1st Duke of Bronte. Scott was chaplain to Nelson at the Battle of Trafalgar and also served as Nelson’s private secretary.

Special Collections Rare D 2 A7

Lusty Wind For Carolina

Source: Lusty Wind For CarolinaJoyner Rare PS3511 L449 L8 1944b

Lusty Wind for Carolina

Lusty Wind for Carolina

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:

Minna Towner Englis [Inglis?] Clark Fletcher (1879-1969), known to readers of her books as Inglis Fletcher, was born in Alton, Illinois. She married John George Fletcher on April 16, 1902, and the couple moved to California. Peggy, as Mrs. Fletcher was known, followed her husband as he worked in several mining camps in California, Oregon, and Alaska. While living in Spokane, Washington, during and after World War I, Mrs. Fletcher performed considerable volunteer work for the Red Cross. While in Washington she met Arctic explorer Vilhjalmur Stefansson, who encouraged her to write.

It was not until 1931, however, that she published her first book, The White Leopard. Another eight years passed before her first Carolina novel, Raleigh’s Eden, was deemed publishable by The Bobbs-Merrill Company. Thereafter Mrs. Fletcher produced novels regularly: Men of Albemarle (1942), Lusty Wind for Carolina (1944), Toil of the Brave (1946), Roanoke Hundred (1948), Bennett’s Welcome (1950), Queen’s Gift (1952), The Scotswoman (1955), Wind in the Forest (1957), Pay, Pack, and Follow and Cormorant’s Brood (1959), The Wicked Lady (1961), and Rogue’s Harbor (1964). This edition of Lusty Wind is dedicated to Vilhjamur Stefansson.Inglis Fletcher, Lusty Wind For Carolina, Philadelphia, Blakiston Company, 1944.

Special Collections, Rare Books, PS3511 L449 L8 1944b

Christmas Card by William Meade Prince, 1950

Source: Inglis Fletcher Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection 21.17.e

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:

The image on this Christmas card was drawn by William Meade Prince (1893-1951), an illustrator and author who lived in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. A native of Roanoke, Virginia, Prince studied art at the New York School of Fine and Applied Arts. Prince illustrated articles in such magazines as Collier’s and Saturday Evening Post and later taught art at the University of North Carolina. He wrote and illustrated The Southern Part of Heaven (1950), a book about his youth in Chapel Hill. Prince probably knew best-selling novelist Inglis Fletcher, to whom the card was sent, through their participation in such groups as the North Carolina Writers Conference. The Inglis Fletcher Papers contain a wealth of information about her career and the work of other North Carolina writers.

You may access the finding aid to the Inglis Fletcher Papers at: Manuscript Collection #21

To view an enlarged version of this image, click on the image itself.

Christmas Card by William Meade Prince, 1950

Christmas Card by William Meade Prince, 1950

Han Solo's Revenge

Source: Han Solo’s Revenge, Schlobin PS 3554 A417.H33 1979

Cover of Han Solo's revenge.

Cover of Han Solo's revenge.

Staff Person: Nanette Hardison

Description:
This book is from the Schlobin Collection on Science Fiction and Fantasy which is one of the book collections we have here in Special Collections. This collection was established in 2004 by Professor Roger Schlobin to honor his parents, James and Virginia Schlobin. I chose this particular book from the collection because I am a fan of Star Wars and both Han Solo and Chewbacca happen to be my favorite Star Wars characters. The story starts with Han Solo and Chewbacca getting a job for 10,000 credits to pick up some cargo. Han soon discovers that the cargo happens to be slaves thus both he and Chewbacca turn the tables on the slavers and free the slaves. Since Han and Chewbacca were still owed the 10,000, Han goes to meet the slaver at the rendezvous point. It is found that the slaver is a girl named Fiolla who is an officer of the Sector Authority and who was posing as a slaver for a secret mission on the planet Ammuud. In order to get the 10,000, Han and Chewbacca then travel to the planet Ammuud with Fiolla with the rest of the story being about how Han and Chewbacca help Fiolla complete her mission.

Although it has been years since I last read the book, I remembered it to be a great read so I hope people can find the time to come and read it as well the other wonderful books that we have in this collection.

Mark Twain Letter

Source: Samuel L. Clemens (Mark Twain) Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #446

Letter from Samuel L. Clemens to Walter Williams.

Letter from Samuel L. Clemens to Walter Williams.

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:
The letter attached is by Samuel L. Clemens better known by his pen name of Mark Twain. He used other pen names “Josh” until 1863 and “Thomas Jefferson Snodgrass” before deciding on Mark Twain. He had different jobs in his early years such as, a printers apprentice, a Mississippi riverboat pilot, and a newspaperman. He gradually started writing fiction. His best known books are The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and Huckleberry Finn (1885). Twain was not a racist, although a library in Concord, Massachusetts, banned his book in 1885. He wrote to his publisher, “They have expelled Huck from their library as trash suitable only for the slums'; that will sell 25,000 copies for sure.” Twain was very popular in his day and traveled widely giving talks all over the world. Walter Williams, the founder of the University of Missouri’s journalism school, wrote to Clemens asking him to give a talk at the University of Missouri. He was turned down by Clemens because he was already busy at the time. In his usual humor he said this, because of a recent visit to Edison’s laboratory: “While Watterson, by himself, is a useless carbon loop, & I, by myself, am a useless wire, we are an electric light when we combine.” Henry Watterson, was the editor of the Louisville Courier-Journal, who he mentions in the quote. Twain was born and died with Halley’s Comet passing by the earth 1835-1910. He was born in Florida, Missouri on November 30, 1835, and died of heart failure on April 21, 1910. He was and is one of America’s favorite authors. This letter is on loan to us by Ronald W. Hoag, an English Professor here at ECU, and George W. and Ruth N. Hoag. The letter is found in Collection #446 Samuel L. Clemens (Mark Twain) Papers.

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.

Inglis Fletcher

Source: Inglis Fletcher Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #16

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:

Minna Towner Englis Clark Fletcher

Minna Towner Englis [Inglis?] Clark Fletcher (1879-1969), known to readers of her books as Inglis Fletcher, was born in Alton, Illinois, the eldest of three children of Maurice William and Flora Deane (Chapman) Clark. Minna Clark studied sculpture under Robert Bringhurst at Washington University in St. Louis, but was not graduated. She married John George Fletcher on April 16, 1902, and the couple moved to California.

Peggy, as Mrs. Fletcher was known, followed her husband as he worked in several mining camps in California, Oregon, and Alaska. While living in Spokane, Washington, during and after World War I, Mrs. Fletcher performed considerable volunteer work for the Red Cross. While in Washington she met Arctic explorer Vilhjalmur Stefansson, who encouraged her to write.

Mrs. Fletcher’s success as a writer came only after years of unremitting work. In 1920 Robertson-Cole Studios purchased her movie script, The Western Gate. It was not until 1931, however, that she published her first book. The White Leopard, a work ofjuvenile fiction, was based on material she gathered during a trip to Africa and the Near East in 1928. Red Jasmine, a novel published in 1932, also dealt with African themes. Another eight years passed before her first Carolina novel, Raleigh’s Eden, was deemed publishable by The Bobbs-Merrill Company. Thereafter Mrs. Fletcher produced novels regularly: Men of Albemarle (1942), Lusty Wind for Carolina (1944), Toil of the Brave (1946), Roanoke Hundred (1948), Bennett’s Welcome (1950), Queen’s Gift (1952), The Scotswoman (1955), Wind in the Forest (1957), Pay, Pack, and Follow and Cormorant’s Brood(1959), The Wicked Lady (1961), and Rogue’s Harbor (1964).

The Fletchers in 1944 purchased Bandon Plantation near Edenton, N.C. Subsequently, Mrs. Fletcher devoted much of her time to historical activities. She served on the Tryon Palace Commission, the Roanoke Island Historical Association, and the boards of other organizations. She remained active until the early 1960s. Mrs. Fletcher died in Edenton and was buried in the National Cemetery in Wilmington. Further biographical information may be found in Richard Walser, Inglis Fletcher of Bandon Plantation (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Library, 1952); Inglis Fletcher, Pay, Pack, and Follow (New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1959); and Who’s Who in America, vol. 34, p.692. All of these sources should be used with caution.