Insight from an Englishman

Source: Jerome R. Worsley Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #1214

Staff Person: Nanette Hardison

This page is from a piece of correspondence (June 27, 1953) that is part of the papers of Jerome R. Worsley, who was born in Bethel, N.C. and was a student of the East Carolina Teachers College (which is now East Carolina University). The letter was written to Mr. Worsley by Clive Irving, an author living in Britain during the year of Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation. In the letter, Mr. Irving describes how Americans and the English view each other, Britain’s equivalent of the McCarthy Red Scare problem and styles of clothing. The letter can be viewed in its’ entirety here http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/27449 and the finding aid for the Jerome R. Worsley Papers can be accessed at http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/special/ead/view.aspx?id=1214&q=1214.

Nuclear Age

 

Source: The Daily Reflector Image Collection East Carolina MC #741.28.f.45

Staff Person: Dale Sauter

Description:  Over seventy years ago, on December 2, 1942, the first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction was initiated. For more details, see the source link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_Pile-1
This week’s staff pick is a reminder of the public’s awareness and fear after the start of the nuclear age.

Senator Sam Ervin

Source: Jack Holland Spain Papers, Manuscript Collection #1122

Staff Member: Nanette Hardison

Description: This image from 1973 is a portrait of Senator Sam J. Ervin with a written note of appreciation to Jack Spain for his service as the Senator’s administrative assistant.  Senator Ervin served as a North Carolina senator from  1954 to 1974.  During his career as Senator, he was instrumental in bringing about the downfall of Senator Joseph McCarthy in 1954 and in participating in the investigation of Watergate in 1972 which led to President Richard Nixon’s resignation.

William Woods Holden Election Handbill

Source: Benjamin B. Winborne Papers #691-005, East Carolina Manuscript Collection

Staff Person: Dale Sauter

Description:

Today’s staff pick features an original handbill (circa 1868) promoting the election of William Woods Holden for Governor and Tod Robinson Caldwell for the first ever position of Lieutenant Governor in North Carolina.  They were both elected to office.  Holden (1818-1892) was the only Chief Executive in North Carolina history to be impeached and removed from office (and the first in the nation to endure that indignity.)  Holden was posthumously and unanimously pardoned by the North Carolina Senate in 2011.

Watching the Vote Tally

Source:   Daily Reflector Negative Collection #741.33.b.4

Staff Person:  Martha Elmore

Description:  In Greenville, N.C., before the era of quick electronic vote tabulations for election results,  people used to wait outside the Daily Reflector office and watch as vote tallies were posted and updated on the tally board.  This June 1964 photograph shows the vote tally being adjusted while citizens watch and wait for final tallies.

The Fugitive Slave Act Passed by, the Senate and House of Representatives September 12, 1850 & Approved by, President Millard Fillmore September 18, 1850

Source: The Fugitive Slave Act, East Carolina Manuscript Collection MB0001 (Miscellaneous Broadsides)

The Fugitive Slave Act

The Fugitive Slave Act

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

In the 1840’s the Underground Railroad was very busy due to the 1842 Supreme Court ruling of “Prigg” v. “Pennsylvania,” which held that states could pass laws prohibiting interference with runaway slaves.

This era ended when Congress passed The Compromise of 1850, which was a chain of bills whose purpose was to stabilize territorial and slavery issues. The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 was the fourth of five laws used to placate the South, giving slave owners immense powers to retrieve their escaped slaves. This version required federal judicial officials to execute warrants in ALL States and territories, even that prohibited slavery. For instance, section 5 of the act states, “be it further enacted, That it shall be the duty of all marshals and deputy marshals to obey and execute all warrants and precepts issued under the provisions of this act, when to them directed; and should any marshal or deputy refuse to receive such warrant or other process, when tendered, or use all proper means diligently to execute the same, he shall on conviction thereof, be fined the sum of ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS….” The law also mandated ordinary citizens to help slave catchers: ALL GOOD CITIZENS ARE HEREBY COMMANDED TO AID AND ASSIST…”

In addition, any person helping a runaway slave could be imprisoned and fined: “any person who shall knowingly or willingly obstruct, hinder or prevent such claimant,…DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY TO ESCAPE from claimant…, or SHALL HARBOR or CONCEAL such fugitive, so as to prevent the discovery and arrest of such person,…, shall, for either of said offences be subject to a fine not exceeding ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS and IMPRISONMENT NOT EXCEEDING SIX MONTHS….

This law was pro-slavery; it gave controlling force to the Southern states and slave owners. It was passed to help settle the turmoil between pro-slavery and anti-slavery factions, but it only postponed the inevitable Civil War.

This broadside can be found in Manuscript Collection MB0001 (Miscellaneous Broadsides).

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.

Hoover Days Cart

Source: Guide to the Daily Reflector Negative Collection, ca. 1920-1967, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #741

Hoover cart

Hoover cart

Staff Person: Nanette Hardison

Description:

The image shown above (1951) is of two men in a cart drawn by a mule with the purpose of persuading voters to cast their ballots for Adlai Stevenson in the 1952 Presidential Election. The vehicle represents a “Hoover Cart”, a symbol of the Great Depression. The Hoover Cart was driven by North Carolina farmers as a form of transportation during the Depression and was built by taking the rear wheels off of a car and attaching them to a cart. The cart was then pulled by either mule or horse. The drivers of these carts would stop at service stations for water for the horse or mule and air for the tires, for which there was no cost.

This image can be found in the Daily Reflector Negative Collection #741.1.d.57. The collection is a treasure trove of images documenting Greenville, N.C., which were taken between 1947 and 1967 by Greenville’s Daily Reflector photographers. Persons who are interested in viewing more images from the collection can go to http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/reflector/. Further information can be found at http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/special/ead/findingaids/0741/.

Source: Kammerer, Roger and Pearce, Candace. Images of America Greenville. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, copyrighted 2001.

Lawrence Douglas Wilder

Source: Preliminary Inventory of the Carroll H. Leggett Collection, 1970-1990, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #856

Staff Person: Nanette Hardison

Description:

On January 20, 2009, Barack Obama became the 44th President of the United States, an event of great historical significance because he is the first African American to be elected to the office. Another historical first occurred on January 13, 1990. An African American named Lawrence Douglas Wilder became the first African American to be sworn in as governor of a U.S. state. He served as Governor of Virginia from 1990 to 1994. The two images shown below are the invitations to Wilder’s inauguration (left) and to the inaugural festivities (right).

General Assembly of Virginia Inaugural Committee, State Capitol, Richmond, VA invitation to attend inauguration of Lawrence Douglas Wilder and Donald Sternoff Beyer, Jr. as Governor and Lt. Governor of Virginia, 1/13/1990

General Assembly of Virginia Inaugural Committee, State Capitol, Richmond, VA invitation to attend inauguration of Lawrence Douglas Wilder and Donald Sternoff Beyer, Jr. as Governor and Lt. Governor of Virginia, 1/13/1990

Inaugural Committee invitation to attend festivities celebrating inauguration of Lawrence Douglas Wilder as Gov. of Virgina, 12 -13 January 1990 (1 p.)

Inaugural Committee invitation to attend festivities celebrating inauguration of Lawrence Douglas Wilder as Gov. of Virgina, 12 -13 January 1990

Both of these invitations come from the Carroll H. Leggett Collection (MC #856), a collection that contains items pertaining to state and national politics. Among them are items from the presidential inaugurations of Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton and from the gubernatorial inaugurations of Lawrence Wilder and Michael Easley. One notable item in this collection is a sheet containing the guidelines for Presidential Inaugural Ceremonies for inaugural attendees (1993).

John F. Kennedy Campaign Poster, circa 1960

Source: Joseph F. and Lala Carr Steelman Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #924

JFK campaign poster

JFK campaign poster

Staff Person: Dale Sauter

Description:

Today’s staff pick is a John F. Kennedy campaign poster (circa 1960) from the Joseph F. and Lala Carr Steelman Papers (#924). The Steelmans, who taught in ECU’s Department of History for many years, were active politically. The poster is believed to have been one used at Kennedy’s appearance at ECU (then East Carolina College) on September 17, 1960, during his campaign for President. This appearance marked the first time a presidential candidate had visted the city of Greenville. A photo of the event from East Carolina University’s Archives is also featured with the poster.

Kennedy Visits Greenville

Kennedy Visits Greenville