Bodie Island Lighthouse

Source: Jan Sellars Coward Collection, (Manuscript Collection #1112)

Staff Person: Jennifer Joyner

Description: With warm weather approaching, many are starting to make plans for a trip to the beach. One tourist attraction at the North Carolina coast is the Bodie Island Lighthouse. Located south of Nags Head, the current Bodie Island Lighthouse was built in 1872. Two other Bodie Island Lighthouse structures, no longer in existence, were built in 1847 and 1859.  Today’s structure stands 150 feet tall and has a signal that’s visible for 19 miles. The Bodie Island Lighthouse recently underwent a massive 3-year, $5 million restoration. It reopened in April 2013, and the public can now climb all 214 steps to the top of the lighthouse to enjoy the views of the Outer Banks.

This undated image of the Bodie Island Lighthouse was taken by Jan Sellers Coward of eastern North Carolina. For other images of eastern North Carolina, see the Jan Sellars Coward Collection (#1112), East Carolina Manuscript Collection, J. Y. Joyner Library.

Petticoat Pilots Meeting

Source: Daily Reflector Negative Collection (Manuscript Collection #741)

Staff Person: Martha Elmore

Description:

For decades women faced tremendous hurdles in their desire to become pilots.  In the early years they weren’t allowed to enter into competitions such as the National Air Race because these races were thought to be too dangerous for women.  In 1929 women pilots held their first National Women’s Air Derby.  Humorist Will Rogers, who was the starter for the race, referred to the women pilots as “petticoat pilots and flying flappers” and nicknamed the race the Powder Puff Derby.

This photograph shows a group of women welcoming Petticoat Pilots to the airport at Greenville, North Carolina, in August of 1965.  I don’t know what the occasion was for this group of women pilots gathering, but it is interesting that the nickname for women pilots in 1929 was still being used in 1965.

Information about the Powder Puff Derby came from Karen Bush Gibson’s book titled, Women Aviators:  26 Stories of Pioneer Flights, Daring Missions, and Record-Setting Journeys.

Concrete River Steamers of World War I, ca. 1921


Source: John B. Green Collection #380.2.b
Staff Person: Jonathan Dembo
Description: Seen in the photograph above are four, unnamed, concrete-hulled river steamers at the Newport Shipping Corporation shipyard, in New Bern, North Carolina. They are obviously incomplete and unnamed. Built to solve the desperate shortage of steel for shipping during World War I, they were just one of the many innovations, from flame-throwers to tanks to aerial warfare, inspired by the “War to End All Wars”. During the first World War, steel had become so scarce that the U. S. Shipping Corporation which controlled all American shipping during the war, recommended that President Woodrow Wilson approve the construction of 24 such concrete ships. Of the 24, only 12 were built, at a total cost of $50 million. The Newport Shipbuilding Corporation of New Bern, NC was one of the companies selected to build the ships. Not one of the ships was finished in time to contribute to the war effort and were launched only in 1921, just when a huge surplus of now-unneeded shipping was beginning to flood the market. By the time the ships were completed, the war was already long over and the nation was still mired in a deep postwar recession. Just what happened to the ships built in New Bern is a matter of some conjecture. Most of the others sank or were converted to other purposes such as breakwaters, hotels, and fishing piers. It is unclear what happened to some of them. Please contact the author if you know the present location of any of the New Bern built concrete ships.

City of Greenville, North Carolina

Source: Junius D. Grimes Papers (#571)

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

Take a step back in time to 1914 Greenville, N. C., in this C. E. Weaver Series, “Illustrated Cities”, by Central Publishing Co., Inc., in Richmond, Virginia. Greenville was growing and changing: The Center Brick Warehouse was selling Bright Leaf Tobacco (93,762 pounds avg. at $24.55 per hundred). The Flanagan Buggy Co. distributed products throughout Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, Florida and Alabama. The Greenville Ice and Coal Co. was a necessity for this community. The R.L. Smith Stables sold and exchanged horses and mules. The East Carolina Teachers Training School is now called East Carolina University; the campus consisted of the Power House, Dining Hall, Infirmary, Dormitories and the Administration Building and the soon to be erected library, gymnasium and the President’s Residence. These are just a few highlights from the pamphlet from the Junius D. Grimes Papers #571.

1912 Hat Sales Brochure

Source:  Benjamin B. Winborne Papers, collection number 691-005

Staff Person:  Dale Sauter

Description:  Today’s staff pick features a Spring and Summer 1912 Hat Sales Brochure for clothing manufacturer, Dunlap & Co.  Inside the cover is printed the local sales agency, Sole Agency, Hampton Roads Hat Co., Norfolk, VA. Interestingly, this street scene features both a horse-driven carriage and a “horseless carriage.”

The entire catalog can be found at the following link:

http://specialcollections.ecu.edu/14829

Aerial View of Barbour Boat Works, Inc.

Source:  Barbour Boat Works, Inc. Records

Staff Person:  Dale Sauter

Description:  This image offers a nice view of the Barbour Boat Works factory in New Bern, North Carolina.  The business ended in the mid-1980s.  Included in the Barbour Boat Works, Inc. Records are important ship drawings, correspondence and photos.  We plan to add descriptions of all photos in this collection very soon.  Check the finding aid at the following link for future updates.  http://specialcollections.ecu.edu/special/ead/findingaids/0758/

“Cat’s Eye” Marble Reflector Railroad Crossing Sign

Source:  The Daily Reflector Image Collection,

Staff Person:  Dale Sauter

Description:  The “cat’s eye” marble reflector was invented in 1933 by Percy Shaw of Boothtown, Halifax, West Yorkshire, UK.  Source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat%27s_eye_(road)

1956 GMC Work Trucks Foldout Brochure Poster

Source: Barbour Boat Works, Inc. Records, 1943-1998, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #758

Staff Person: Dale Sauter

Description:

General Motors Corporation (GMC) has flourished throughout much of its history as a major American automobile manufacturer. Considered “one of the big three,” alongside Ford and Chrysler, GMC was created in 1908. The great Wall Street crash in 1929 put a quick halt to all expansion plans for GMC, as its stock price quickly fell. In 1930, GMC bought Electro-Motive Corporation, the internal combustion engine railcar builder. For several years to come, GMC-powered diesel locomotives were heavily used on American railroads. During the early 1930’s GMC continued its recovery and bought the Yellow Coach Bus Company. In 1955 GMC became the first company to make more than a billion dollars in one year. At one time GMC was also the largest corporation in the United States and the single largest employer in the world. However, in 2005 GMC posted a loss of $4 billion, laid off approximately 30,000 employees, and closed 12 plants. GMC largely flourished as a company for nearly a century before officially declaring bankruptcy in June 2009.

Source: http://ezinearticles.com/?The-History-of-GM—General-Motors&id=110696

Today’s staff pick offers a glimpse into the golden age of GMC. This is a foldout brochure poster advertising GMC’s line of work trucks for 1956. The brochure was sent from Craven Motor Co., Inc. in New Bern, N.C. to Barbour Boat Works (also in New Bern).

For more information on the Barbour Boat Works Records or any other collections we hold, please contact us for further details.

1956 GMC work trucks foldout brochure poster

1956 GMC work trucks foldout brochure poster

1956 GMC work trucks foldout brochure poster

1956 GMC work trucks foldout brochure poster