Certificate for Captain Leo W. Jenkins for completion of Special Services reserve training at Camp Lejeune, N.C., 1949.

Source: Leo Jenkins Papers, Manuscript # 360

Staff Person:  Dale Sauter

Description:  Certificate for Captain Leo W. Jenkins for completion of Special Services reserve training at Camp Lejeune, N.C., 1949. Jenkins served as a Major in World War II where he saw action at Guadalcanal, Guam and Iwo Jima. For his military service, Jenkins received the Bronze Star and two Presidential Citations. In 1947 Jenkins joined the faculty of East Carolina Teachers College, where he served as Dean until being elected as President of the college in 1960. He eventually was named Chancellor, and retired in 1978. date: 1949; creator: U.S. Marine Corps

'Tis the Season for Studying

741.5.d.34

Source:  Daily Reflector Negative Collection (#741.5.d.34)

Staff Person:  Jennifer Joyner

Description:

The month of December is always a busy time for college students. At East Carolina University, Joyner Library has been bustling around the clock with students finishing their coursework and preparing for exams. The same was true in December 1954, when this photograph was taken by a Daily Reflector photographer. Even though times have changed and the landscape of the library looks much different today, Joyner remains the place to study on campus. To see more photographs of Greenville’s past, be sure to check out the Daily Reflector Negative Collection, Manuscript Collection #741.

World's Fastest Typist

Source: University Archives UA55-01-8226

Staff Person: Arthur Carlson

Description:

This picture from the University Archives features Cortez W. Peters, Sr who held the world record as the World’s Fastest Typist (UA55-01-8226).  Born in Maryland, Peters achieved a then world record of 141 words per minute in 1925.  With the advent of improved typing technology, Peters eventually peaked at 180 words per minute perfectly, a record that would stand until his son, Cortez W. Peters, Jr. surpassed his father.  A favorite guest of television variety show hosts, he also aided the Allied war effort during WWII by acquiring and donating typewriters for use by the Federal government.   A decade later, Peters opened with his son the first black-owned typing schools, the Cortez Peters Business Schools,  featuring offices in Chicago, Baltimore, and Washington, DC.  The schools served over 45,000 students.  He visited East Carolina to meet with business students during summer school sessions that allowed blacks to attend classes before the formal desegregation of East Carolina.  Peters passed away in 1964 at the age of 57 in Washington, DC.

1966 ECC College Bowl Team

Source: University Archives 55-01-1232
Staff Person: Kacy Guill
Description:
In the spring of 1966, four students from East Carolina College participated in the GE College Bowl, a college level quiz bowl that aired on television.  The ECC team won their first game against Ursuline College 175-100 but they lost the second game to Rice University 390-135.  The photograph shows the send-off crowd as the team left by car.

UN Walkout

Source: University Archives

Staff Person: Kacy Guill

Description:

On Friday, April 7, 1967, eight delegates from North Carolina College at Durham (now North Carolina Central University) and Florida A&M University, who were on campus attending the ninth annual Middle South Model United Nations, walked out of the General Assembly. The African American delegates stated that they had been discriminated against by both the Model UN and ECC students and administrators.

Although the official conclusion was that the delegates from North Carolina College and Florida A&M University came to the assembly in search of publicity and attention, it was the first time since the integration of ECC that college officials were forced to publicly address discrimination on campus.

Sources:

“Take Up the Revolution.” East Carolinian, April 11, 1967.

Steve A. Baldwin. Letter to the Editor. East Carolinian, April 18, 1967.

Take Up the Revolution

Take Up the Revolution

Letter to the Editor; S. Baldwin

Letter to the Editor; S. Baldwin

ECU Facilities Services

Source: Guide to the Daily Reflector Negative Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #741

Mowing yard

Mowing yard

Staff Person: L. K. Gypsye Legge

Description:

The humidity is getting thicker and you are more likely to hear the buzz of insects on campus than students in the evenings. But in a month and a day the primary mission of East Carolina will reassert itself with great vigor – a new school year will begin! Facilities Services [http://www.ecu.edu/cs-admin/campus_operations/facilities/index.cfm] keeps the campus looking great all year, even when heat and humidity and summer showers make it quite a challenge.

We all tend to add a little extra elbow grease as we prepare to welcome new faculty and students, and welcome back returning Pirates. This image, from August 1958 of a man mowing one of the lawns on campus, shows that it has been this way for more than half a century:  http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/3308

From the Daily Reflector Collection, this image and many others were digitalized as part of the Seeds of Change project. More information of the project is available here:

http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/reflector/

There are many items that focus on East Carolina in this collection, and there are thousands more images in the University Archives.

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.

ECU Historic Documentation of Support Staff

Source: University Archives

Page from the 1927 Tecoan showing the housekeeping and dining hall staff. Text at the bottom of the page reads "We Couldn't Do Without Them."

Page from the 1927 Tecoan showing the housekeeping and dining hall staff. Text at the bottom of the page reads "We Couldn't Do Without Them."

Staff Person: Kacy Guill

Description:

Many university archives are increasingly trying to increase documentation of under-represented groups in archival collections including African-American, Latino, Asian American, Native Americans, women, and members of the gay, bisexual, and transgender communities.

Perhaps one of the most under-documented groups in East Carolina University history is the support staff: the men and women who cleaned classrooms and dorm rooms, cooked and served food in the dining halls, and maintained the often photographed landscaping of the University. For many years, their role in the University was only preserved as line items in the budget and brief mentions in the campus newspaper of a “servant” caught stealing clothing in the dorms or a reminder to thank the “girl” who served the food in the dining hall. Below are two of the few images that document support staff at ECU.

Page from the 1927 Tecoan showing the housekeeping and dining hall staff. Text at the bottom of the page reads “We Couldn’t Do Without Them.” (p741.14.e.6)

East Carolina College cafeteria

East Carolina College cafeteria

“Students lined up while workers serve them in the cafeteria at East Carolina College” Daily Reflector, 1958.

ECC Patch

Source: University Archives, CH0001/3

East Carolina College Patch

East Carolina College Patch

Staff Person: Suellyn Lathrop

Description:
This patch is currently on display as part of the third installment of the Centennial Exhibits created by graduate student Adrienne Rae. Adrienne has done a great job putting together some really interesting exhibits. This month she is in the process of creating the fourth installment regarding East Carolina University 1967 – present. Please come visit now to see the East Carolina College exhibit and in October to see the East Carolina University exhibit. And don’t despair if you can’t make it over to Special Collections, the exhibiits are available online at: ECU Centennial Exhibit Series.

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.