UN Walkout

Source: University Archives

Staff Person: Kacy Guill

Description:

On Friday, April 7, 1967, eight delegates from North Carolina College at Durham (now North Carolina Central University) and Florida A&M University, who were on campus attending the ninth annual Middle South Model United Nations, walked out of the General Assembly. The African American delegates stated that they had been discriminated against by both the Model UN and ECC students and administrators.

Although the official conclusion was that the delegates from North Carolina College and Florida A&M University came to the assembly in search of publicity and attention, it was the first time since the integration of ECC that college officials were forced to publicly address discrimination on campus.

Sources:

“Take Up the Revolution.” East Carolinian, April 11, 1967.

Steve A. Baldwin. Letter to the Editor. East Carolinian, April 18, 1967.

Take Up the Revolution

Take Up the Revolution

Letter to the Editor; S. Baldwin

Letter to the Editor; S. Baldwin

ECU Facilities Services

Source: Guide to the Daily Reflector Negative Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #741

Mowing yard

Mowing yard

Staff Person: L. K. Gypsye Legge

Description:

The humidity is getting thicker and you are more likely to hear the buzz of insects on campus than students in the evenings. But in a month and a day the primary mission of East Carolina will reassert itself with great vigor – a new school year will begin! Facilities Services [http://www.ecu.edu/cs-admin/campus_operations/facilities/index.cfm] keeps the campus looking great all year, even when heat and humidity and summer showers make it quite a challenge.

We all tend to add a little extra elbow grease as we prepare to welcome new faculty and students, and welcome back returning Pirates. This image, from August 1958 of a man mowing one of the lawns on campus, shows that it has been this way for more than half a century:  http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/3308

From the Daily Reflector Collection, this image and many others were digitalized as part of the Seeds of Change project. More information of the project is available here:

http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/reflector/

There are many items that focus on East Carolina in this collection, and there are thousands more images in the University Archives.

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.

President Wright’s Chapel Talk Concerning the Budget

Source: University Archives, Chancellor’s Office, Record Group CH1050, Series 2, Subseries 1, Box 1, Folder 6

Staff Person: Brian Johnson

Description:

The images below are from East Carolina Teachers College President Robert H. Wright’s “Chapel Talks” given to students every morning from 9:30 to 10:25 six days a week. Chapel Talks typically consisted of a reading from the Bible followed by Wright’s thoughts regarding the Bible passage or some other moral instruction for the students, along with any news, schedule changes, or other announcements. The subject of this address is the budgetary process and Wright’s concern over the lack of funds for ECTC.

This and other speeches may be found in the records of the Chancellor’s Office, Record Group CH1050, Series 2, Subseries 1, Box 1, Folder 6, in the University Archives.

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.

President Wright's Chapel Talk Concerning the Budget

President Wright's Chapel Talk Concerning the Budget

President Wright's Chapel Talk Concerning the Budget

President Wright's Chapel Talk Concerning the Budget

President Wright's Chapel Talk Concerning the Budget

President Wright's Chapel Talk Concerning the Budget

President Wright's Chapel Talk Concerning the Budget

President Wright's Chapel Talk Concerning the Budget

The Model School

Source: University Archives, Call Number 50-20-1918

The Model School

The Model School

Staff Person: Kacy Guill

Description:

Also known as the practice school, the training school, and the laboratory school, the East Carolina Teachers Training School Model School opened in 1915. The model school was built to ensure that “students who are teachers and who are to become teachers see children at work and where they may work with the children under guidance.” The model school was located on the edge of the ravine and within ten years the foundation became unstable forcing the removal of the school.

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.

1993 Commencement

Source: University Archives

1993 Commencement (UW 0000: 2: 6: A:.1)

1993 Commencement (UW 0000: 2: 6: A:.1)

Staff Person: L. K. Gypsye Legge

Description:

As the days lengthen and become even warmer, activity on campus reaches an annual peak. Faculty and students prepare for examinations and make final arrangements for summer plans such as studies abroad, internships or AFROTC Field Training. But the ultimate moment of spring on campus is commencement. To stand before friends, family or others and be given due honor for academic achievement is a crowning moment of matriculation. The picture above appears to be from before the ceremony in 1993, as all tassels are on the right side of the mortarboard. As you can see, even an important occasion has elements of fun for Pirates!

There have been some notable changes to the ritual and surrounding events during the first century of East Carolina graduations. Photographs in the University Archives of early commencements show female graduates attired in white dresses, and two years ago the University adopted purple regalia for graduation, which makes for some very colorful images. An image of the 1932 graduation (bottom left, ECU:06: A:.1: pa149) stills shows white dresses, while a photograph from 1936 of First in the Family Oral History Collection contributor Mary Boyd Mann has her wearing a cap and gown (bottom right, Image accessed via http://media.lib.ecu.edu/firstgeneration/gallery1.cfm):

Commencement, 1932.

Commencement, 1932.

Mary Boyd Mann

Mary Boyd Mann

No matter if commencement ceremonies were held on a temporary stage in a wooded area (bottom left, ECU: 06:A:.1: p926), a dusty football field (bottom right, ECU:06:A:.1: pa362)

1928 Commencement

1928 Commencement

Commencement

Commencement

or in the air-conditioned coliseum of more recent years, the pomp and circumstance and even the lighthearted displays all serve to honor those who have made the effort to be able to go forth and live ECU’s motto: “SERVIRE”.

Click on the images to see an enlarged version.

Students’ gardens at East Carolina Teachers Training School, 1914

Source: University Archives

Student Gardens

Student Gardens

Staff Person: Kacy Guill

Description:

In his 1910 report to the Board of Trustees, the president of East Carolina Teachers Training School, Robert Wright, requested land for a farm and dairy. He argued that “the public school teacher of the near future is going to be required to have a much more definite knowledge of farm life…” Ten years later, he was still requesting farmland, and between $150.00 and $500.00 dollars was being spent on the farm gardens annually.

At the time, students used part of the campus for their farm gardens. In 1915, student Christine Johnston wrote, “this year about the first of April the girls of our class were rather surprised to find themselves with hoes, garden rakes, and three prong cultivator hoes.” She planted radishes, turnips, beets, carrots, lettuce, onions, snap beans, and tomatoes. When she had to leave her garden for her commencement she sadly noted “my onions were large enough to eat and my snap beans only needed a few more days.”

Student Gardens

Student Gardens

Click on the images to view enlarged versions.

Edward R. Murrow Delivering 1963 Commencement Speech

Source: University Archives, UW0000:2:14:a:3

B/W film w/audio of Edward R Murrow speaking

B/W film w/audio of Edward R Murrow speaking

Staff Person: L. K. Gypsye Legge

Description:

As the spring semester advances, graduation may seem in the distant future, but in about 12 weeks students will turn their tassels and join the ranks of ECU alumni. While plans have not been announced for the 101st commencement speaker, there is no doubt that this will be a memorable day for the graduates, their families, and friends. The University Archives strives to record every event of note on campus. There are many records related to graduation, such as Commencement programs and numerous photographs. One very special record we have is a 16 mm film of the 1963 commencement speech. The speaker, pictured below in frames scanned from the film, was Edward R. Murrow.

Edward R. Murrow was a native son of North Carolina, having been born in Guilford County. He had an illustrious career in broadcast journalism, and went on to be appointed head of the United States Information Agency. The Voice of America, part of the USIA, has a large presence in Pitt County. In 1963, the VoA had just begun broadcasting and receiving in Pitt County at three sites [http://digitial.lib.ecu.edu/historyfiction/fullview.aspx?id=voa, accessed 2 Feb 2009] so that may have been a contributing factor to Mr. Murrow being invited to speak.

On the subject of the speech, please note the wavering pattern to the right of the image. That is an optical sound track, probably applause given the regular pattern. We were very excited to locate this item during a survey of media in the Archives, but have yet to be able to project the film and listen to the speech. Film projectors are aging along with films, and at this time Special Collections does not have a projector that we would trust with such a unique and valuable item. Written records of the speech exist, so once funds have been secured to properly transfer this item, we can compare the text with the words as they were spoken.

Those interested in this film, or any other media, are welcome to contact the University Archives for further information.

Click on the image to view an enlarged version.

ECU Historic Documentation of Support Staff

Source: University Archives

Page from the 1927 Tecoan showing the housekeeping and dining hall staff. Text at the bottom of the page reads "We Couldn't Do Without Them."

Page from the 1927 Tecoan showing the housekeeping and dining hall staff. Text at the bottom of the page reads "We Couldn't Do Without Them."

Staff Person: Kacy Guill

Description:

Many university archives are increasingly trying to increase documentation of under-represented groups in archival collections including African-American, Latino, Asian American, Native Americans, women, and members of the gay, bisexual, and transgender communities.

Perhaps one of the most under-documented groups in East Carolina University history is the support staff: the men and women who cleaned classrooms and dorm rooms, cooked and served food in the dining halls, and maintained the often photographed landscaping of the University. For many years, their role in the University was only preserved as line items in the budget and brief mentions in the campus newspaper of a “servant” caught stealing clothing in the dorms or a reminder to thank the “girl” who served the food in the dining hall. Below are two of the few images that document support staff at ECU.

Page from the 1927 Tecoan showing the housekeeping and dining hall staff. Text at the bottom of the page reads “We Couldn’t Do Without Them.” (p741.14.e.6)

East Carolina College cafeteria

East Carolina College cafeteria

“Students lined up while workers serve them in the cafeteria at East Carolina College” Daily Reflector, 1958.

Faculty Meeting on Wright Inauguration and Formation of Students Council

Source: University Archives Record Group SL2600

Staff Person: Brian Johnson

Description:

The image below is of the East Carolina Teachers Training School faculty meeting minutes from Nov. 1, 1909. In this meeting C. W. Wilson, H. E. Austin and Miss Sally Joyner Davis were appointed the committee to supervise the mailing of invitations and the making of arrangements for the inauguration of President Robert Wright on November 12, 1909. Mrs. Kate R. Beckwith, Miss Maria Graham and Miss Kate Lewis were appointed a committee on decorations for the inauguration. The faculty decided in the meeting to encourage the formation of a “Students Council.” This would later become the Women’s Student Self-Government Association and, by 1937, the Women’s Student Council. It is known as the Student Government Association today.

These minutes and many more can be found in the University Archives at Joyner Library. Record Group SL2600 http://www.ecu.edu/cs-lib/archives/index.cfm

Faculty minutes from Nov 1, 1909

Faculty minutes from Nov 1, 1909

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.

Use of Closed Circuit TV Marks the Beginning of ECU's Technological Progress

Source: University Archives

East Carolinian front page, 1958

East Carolinian front page, 1958

Staff Person: L. K. Gypsye Legge

Description:

In 2008, East Carolina University celebrates the Golden Anniversary of homecoming with our Golden Class: the graduates of 1958. That year, East Carolina College, as the institution was then known, celebrated 50 years of higher education in Eastern North Carolina with an enthusiasm as great as we have seen for the centennial of East Carolina Unversity. Reviewing documents of the era for an exhibit to honor visiting alumni, I found the image below amusing and enlightening:

A 21-inch television seems almost quaint, as an educational experiment, in light of the more than 300 Smart Classrooms, complete with computer controlled projectors and web access, available today. There is also a reference to Joyner Library as the site of the studios. Even with progress, some things are constant. Today Joyner Library still contains studios, but now the focus is on videoconferencing [http://www.ecu.edu/cs-lib/systems/JL_Videoconferencing.cfm, accessed November 5, 2008.]

ECU has the largest distance education prograrm in North Carolina [http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/DEOrientation/upload/StudentSept07.htm, accessed November 5, 2008.] With this anonymous news item and photo, it becomes clear that many of our current achievements are the result of decades of effort pursuing all avenues to provide effective education for all students enrolled in East Carolina University.