Original, signed letter from Caleb (C. D.) Bradham, Sr., inventor of Pepsi-Cola

Source: Minges Collection #1136.1.a

Staff Person: Dale Sauter

Description: Original, signed letter from Caleb (C. D.) Bradham, Sr., inventor of Pepsi-Cola, to Dr. Jos. J. Watson in South Carolina promoting Pepsi-Cola as a safe drink.  Bradham also mentions some basic ingredients found in the beverage (1917).

Advertising Pamphlet for Keeley Institute, Greensboro, N.C.

Source: Edward Merritt McEachern, Jr., Collection  #25.2.c

Staff Person:  Martha Elmore

Description:  The Keeley Institute in Greensboro, N.C., was established circa 1891 and it survived until 1961.  From 1906 on the Institute operated at Blandwood, the former home of N.C. Governor John Motley Morehead.  The Greensboro location was just one of over more than 200 branches of the original Keeley Institute founded in 1879 in Dwight, Illinois, for the purpose of administering the Keeley Cure to alcoholics. [Source: Wikipedia and Preservation Greensboro Incorporated]    

This undated pamphlet illustrates the before and after caricatures of an alcoholic who takes the cure at the Keeley Institute in Greensboro, N.C.  The top half of the pamphlet opens up to reveal the cured patient.  For a related collection, see the William H. Osborn Papers Manuscript Collection #41. Col. Osborn owned the Keeley Institute in Greensboro for many years.

1918 Flu Pandemic nickname “Spanish Flu”, March 1918 to June 1920

Source: University Archives

ECTTS Board of Trustees Minute Book 1

ECTTS Board of Trustees Minute Book 1

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

Health conditions at ECTTC are one of the major topics mentioned in the Board of Trustees minutes from 1918. There were 141 cases of the Spanish flu recorded on campus, but there was no record of serious complications. Worldwide this was not the same. This flu epidemic was called “the greatest medical holocaust in history.” The pandemic infected one third of the world’s population, and most of its victims were young healthy adults. Normally influenza attacks the weakest population, namely infants and the elderly. The images shown below are two documents from the ECTTC Board of Trustees Minutes Book 1, November 15, 1918 which is in the University Archives.

Letter of Walter Clark to Dr. Charles O'Hagan Laughinghouse

Letter to Dr. Charles O'Hagan Laughinghouse from Walter Clark

Letter to Dr. Charles O'Hagan Laughinghouse from Walter Clark

Source: Charles O’Hagan Laughinghouse Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #267

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:

Charles O’Hagan Laughinghouse (1871-1930), a native of Pitt County, North Carolina, worked as a physician in Greenville from 1893, when he was graduated from the University of Pennsylvania’s medical school, until his untimely death. Locally, he served for many years as county coroner, county health officer, and physician of East Carolina Teachers Training School. Active in state health affairs, Dr. Laughinghouse assumed leadership roles in the Medical Society of the State of North Carolina and the State Board of Health. He served as state health officer from 1926 until 1930. Beginning around 1900, Dr. Laughinghouse worked tirelessly to establish a hospital in Pitt County. He was instrumental in having a bond proposal submitted to Pitt County voters in the fall of 1916. The failure of this measure prompted North Carolina Supreme Court Chief Justice Walter Clark to write this letter of condolence. Clark, editor of the State Records of North Carolina, was a leading voice of the Progressive Movement in North Carolina during the early Twentieth Century. Frustrated by this and future setbacks, Dr. Laughinghouse and three other local physicians in 1924 opened Pitt Community Hospital as a private facility. It was located above a store on Fifth Street in Greenville.

For more information about the Charles O’Hagan Laughinghouse Papers, see the online finding aid available at http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/special/ead/findingaids/0267/

Pitt Community Hospital, Greenville, NC

Source: Frank Wooten Jr, Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #126
David A. Norris Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #687

Pitt Community Hospital, Greenville, N.C.

Pitt Community Hospital, Greenville, N.C.

Staff Person: Coleen Allen

Description:

The white building was Greenville’s original hospital know as Pitt Community Hospital, and was located on Johnston Street, parallel to East Fourth St. When the hospital opened in 1924, it had 42 acute-care beds.

The red brick building below, know as Pitt Memorial Hospital, was located on West Fifth Street and was built in the early 1950s. Later, an 80 bed addition raised the total capacity to 220 beds.

Today Pitt County Memorial Hospital is a 755 bed tertiary academic medical center that provides a comprehensive range of primary, secondary and tertiary medical services to residents of 29 counties in eastern North Carolina. During fiscal year 2006, PCMH set records in several different areas: Inpatient admissions: 36,983; Average inpatient census: 617; Operating room cases: 20, 411; Births: 3,882 and Emergency department visits: 55,354.

Is this progress?

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Pitt Memorial Hospital, Greenville, North Carolina

Pitt Memorial Hospital, Greenville, North Carolina

Kinston High School’s Little Mothers League for Better Babies

Source: Fred & Susan Brock Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #869

Kinston High School's Little Mothers League for Better Babies

Kinston High School's Little Mothers League for Better Babies

Staff Person: Jon Dembo

Description:
The image below is a reproduction of Kinston High School’s Little Mothers League for Better Babies’ group portrait (ca. 1920). It was apparently made from Sadie Stadiem’s copy of the original photograph. The name of the photographer, E. D. Sparrow, of Kinston, NC, appears in the lower right corner of the print.

On the back of the original photographic print is written the admonition: “Lest I forget” and the names of the girls and their unidentified nurse. Reading from left to right, they are:

     Amie Jordan Parham
    Betty Diamond
    Violet Mausfield
    Marjorie Hunter
    Dorothy Suggs
    Grace Wooten
    Ruby Taylor
    Carrie Mae Dunn
    Louise Tull
    Eleanor Edwards
    Mary Emma Bizzel
    Sadie Stadiem
    Louise Bland
    Gladys Worthington
    Ruby Mewbern
    Edna Tilman (Nurse)

The photograph was a gift of Fred and Susan Block, of Wilmington, NC, 4 February 2002 (Mss #869.1.a). You may access the finding aid to the Fred and Susan Block Collection at: Manuscript Collection 869.

If anyone can identify the nurse, standing at right, please contact the Special Collections Department at (252) 328-6671.

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