Vessels Constitution and Etner

Source: U.S. Coast Guard Historian’s Office Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #1041

Two sailing vessels, the Constitution and the Etner

Two sailing vessels, the Constitution and the Etner

Staff Person: Jon Dembo

Description:
This digital image shows two sailing vessels, the CONSTITUTION of Manteo and the ETNER of New Bern, in the waters of Pamlico Sound, North Carolina. The ETNER, the two-masted vessel to starboard, may be in some difficulty or have an injured or sick crewman. Her sails have been hauled in rather clumsily, she is flying a flag at half-mast, and she is tied to the CONSTITUTION by several lines. Both ships appear to have African American crews. The donor, Coast Guard Historian Jeffrey L. Bowdoin, believes that the image was taken from the Coast Guard Cutter KANKAKEE, during the summer of 1921. The KANKAKEE may have been attempting to provide assistance at the time.

The image was made from one of two 3.5″ x 5″ black and white negatives in the U. S. Coast Guard Historian’s Office Collection. Researchers may access the U. S. Coast Guard Historian’s Office Collection (#1041.1.a) through the Special Collections Department Search Desk on the 4th Floor of Joyner Library.

If anyone can provide additional information concerning the ships, crews, or situation shown in the image, please contact the Special Collections Department at (252) 328-6671.

CSS Neuse

Source: William H. Rowland Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #876

CSS Neuse

CSS Neuse

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

This photograph is from Collection #876/12 William H. Rowland Papers (1861-1971). The Hull remnant was of the Confederate ironclad gunboat CSS NEUSE. It was set on fire by Confederate troops to prevent being captured in March of 1865. It was found in the Neuse River and raised after many problems due to lack of funds and ownership controversies. This is one of many 4×5 negatives taken during the archaeology dig in which they recovered 15,000 artifacts. I think this is a truly amazing collection. There is a finding aid online for this collection and you can click this link to get to it: Manuscript Collection 876.