Use of Closed Circuit TV Marks the Beginning of ECU's Technological Progress

Source: University Archives

East Carolinian front page, 1958

East Carolinian front page, 1958

Staff Person: L. K. Gypsye Legge

Description:

In 2008, East Carolina University celebrates the Golden Anniversary of homecoming with our Golden Class: the graduates of 1958. That year, East Carolina College, as the institution was then known, celebrated 50 years of higher education in Eastern North Carolina with an enthusiasm as great as we have seen for the centennial of East Carolina Unversity. Reviewing documents of the era for an exhibit to honor visiting alumni, I found the image below amusing and enlightening:

A 21-inch television seems almost quaint, as an educational experiment, in light of the more than 300 Smart Classrooms, complete with computer controlled projectors and web access, available today. There is also a reference to Joyner Library as the site of the studios. Even with progress, some things are constant. Today Joyner Library still contains studios, but now the focus is on videoconferencing [http://www.ecu.edu/cs-lib/systems/JL_Videoconferencing.cfm, accessed November 5, 2008.]

ECU has the largest distance education prograrm in North Carolina [http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/DEOrientation/upload/StudentSept07.htm, accessed November 5, 2008.] With this anonymous news item and photo, it becomes clear that many of our current achievements are the result of decades of effort pursuing all avenues to provide effective education for all students enrolled in East Carolina University.

Student Handbook

Source: University Archives, E.C. 378.756 Ea771k 1926-34

Staff Person: Brian Johnson

Description:

The images below are from the 1926-1927 Hand Book of East Carolina Teachers College. Of particular interest in the handbook are the Social Regulations. A portion of these regulations are listed below.

1. Calling hours are from 3:30 to 5:45 p.m. on week days; on Sundays from 4:00 to 5:45 p.m.; in evenings from 8:00 to 10:15 p.m.

2. Students who expect company on Sunday (relatives or friends) must file their own names and room number, and the names of the people who are to come. These must be filed not later than Saturday.

3. When a student wishes to go calling, she must sign her name, the name and address of the person upon whom she wishes to call, and file in the office of the Lady Principal not later than 1:45 p.m. on the day she wishes to call. If she hears nothing further from the Lady Principal, it is understood that her request is granted.

4. After public entertainments students may converse with guests, but must bid them good night before leaving the Administration Building.

5. Students must not dine at restaurants, go to any office or to the rail road station without special permission from the Lady Principal.

6. Students may speak to young men on the street, but not carry on an extended conversation with them, or walk with them.

7. Students must wear hats when shopping or calling.

These handbooks were originally printed by the YWCA and are quite small, measuring 4 3/4″ x 3″. Some hyperlinked footnotes have been added to aid the reader.

The Student Handbook is available for researchers to use in the library in the North Carolina Collection, call number Joyner NC Reference LD1741 E44 A15x, and in the University Archives.

Citation for this excerpt is:

East Carolina Teachers College. YWCA. Hand Book of East Carolina Teachers College. Greenville, N.C.: The College, 1926. pp. 37-48.

Click on each image belong to view the larger version

Hand Book of East Carolina Teachers College

Hand Book of East Carolina Teachers College

Hand Book of East Carolina Teachers College

Hand Book of East Carolina Teachers College

Hand Book of East Carolina Teachers College

Hand Book of East Carolina Teachers College

Hand Book of East Carolina Teachers College

Hand Book of East Carolina Teachers College

J.Y. Joyner

Source: University Archives, Call # ECU/03/J

Staff Person: Brian Johnson

Description:

The image below is from pages eight and nine of the 1949 Techoan, which was dedicated to J.Y. Joyner. J.Y. Joyner Library at East Carolina University and the J.Y. Joyner elementary school in Raleigh are his namesakes.

J. Y. Joyner

J. Y. Joyner

Written on page eight is the following:

Dr. J.Y. Joyner, who as State Superintendent of Public Instruction, served as ex officio chairman of the Board of Trustees of this college from 1907 to 1919, and who during the construction of the first five buildings on this campus served as a member of the Executive Committee, is probably East Carolina’s oldest friend.

It was through his influence, wisdom, and council that East Carolina is a co-educational college. We feel that it is altogether fitting that this annual be dedicated to Dr Joyner because, last but far from least, he united the friends of the State High School bill with the friends of the East Carolina Teachers Training bill to establish what we feel is one of the best teachers colleges in the United States.

James Yadkin Joyner (1862-1954), a North Carolina native, graduated from the University of North Carolina in 1881 with a Ph.B. degree (bachelor of philosophy) at age 19, the youngest member of the class. He taught in the Winston Graded Schools (1884-1885) and served as superintendent of the Goldsboro Graded Schools (1889-1893). During the intervening period, he studied at Greensboro Law School (1885-1886) and practiced law in the firm of Faircloth, Allen, and Joyner (1886-1889), in Goldsboro. In 1902 Governor Charles Brantley Aycock appointed Joyner superintendent of public instruction. Joyner held his position until 1919. During his term, he instituted many reforms in the state’s system of public education. He was also the first ex-officio chairman of the East Carolina Teachers Training School Board of Trustees (1907-1918) and later a member of the board (1922-1925).

Joyner also served as superintendent of the Lenoir County schools, chairman of the board of education of Wayne County schools, head of the English department of the State Normal and Industrial School for Women in Greensboro, member of board of directors at Meredith College and the University of North Carolina, and the first southerner elected president of the National Education Association.

Click on the image itself to see an enlarged version.

More information about Dr. Joyner can be found in University Archives, the Manuscript Collection in the Special Collections Department at Joyner Library, and at the following links:

http://specialcollections.ecu.edu/special/ead/findingaids/0345/

http://www.jstor.org/sici?sici=0161-956X(196711)45%3A3%3C148%3ATDWSHD%3E2.0.CO%3B2-

Sally Phillips Smith

Source: Oral History Interview #11

Obituary for Mrs. Sally Phillips Smith

Obituary for Mrs. Sally Phillips Smith

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

Sally Smith was born in Hyde County on November 15, 1877 and died on May 1978. She taught for over 44 years in rural elementary black schools. She attended Bricks School in North Carolina, Hampton Institute in Virginia and the North Carolina College in Durham. She talks about her parents being former slaves, her life, and problems of teaching with hardly any school supplies. This is an excerpt from the interview Donald R. Lennon took on June 12, 1973:

“The best friend I had was a white woman in Atlantic City. What was her name? She was a nurse. You know, we used to be up against it all the time for material to teach. We did not have anything but the children. And sometimes they didn’t have but one or two books, one book maybe; and they didn’t have any desk or anything; and nothing was furnished. It was kind of like when they went down in Egypt and had to make something without straw–make bricks, make bricks without straw. Well, this lady, I met her in Atlantic City. I got a job there, part time, and she and her husband were there. And I met her, She lived on the beach in Atlantic City in the summertime, and in the wintertime they went to Florida. And I went down to work for her, and she got to liking me. She said I’ll never forget you, and she didn’t. After that, she gave me material that made me able to do a lot of things with my school work that I wouldn’t have been able to do, because I wasn’t able to buy. But see, she was in New York, and she used to send me things–send me papers, books and materials.

At Christmas time, she sent me enough candy for each of my little children. They remember it now because she sent a whole bag of Christmas candy in containers of Christmas things. Other teachers couldn’t do it because they didn’t have any money. But I had her behind me, and she never forgot me, just like she said, as long as she lived. She lived to eighty years old, and I guess I was one of the first people to find out she was dead. I think there was a sister who notified me when she finally died. But that made me able to do better work than I would have been able to do, because I didn’t have anything to do with.”

To listen to the excerpt, click on http://www.web.lib.ecu.edu/images/sp/sp87-3.wma

To view an enlarged version of the image, click on the image itself.

1914 Summer Class Photo (ECTTS)

Source: University Archives UW0000/2/4/7.1

Panoramic view of group in front of Old Austin

Panoramic view of group in front of Old Austin

Staff Person: L. K. Gypsye Legge

Description:

It is impossible to predict what may appear next in Special Collections. A phone call was made one afternoon to the Search Room desk. On the line was a woman who lives in Jackson, Mississippi. Her great-aunt was an alumna of East Carolina, and she had a picture to donate to University Archives that included her relative and Robert Wright in a group photo.

Maury York, Assistant Director and Head of Special Collections, was pleased to accept the donation when the donor came to Greenville, and the framed photo came to University Archives for accessioning. It was a delightful shock to realize what had been tentatively identified as an image from the 1920’s is, in fact, our only vintage copy of a photo published in the Volume 1 Number 2 issue of the [ECTTS] Training School Quarterly!

Photographic prints have much more detail than most mass printing methods, and especially printing from the early 20th Century. This photo will allow us to make higher quality images for reproduction, provide more detail for researchers to study and, given that this is the Centennial for ECU, reminds us that we should not think that we are done collecting or researching – something “new” can pop up any time!

Yearbooks

Source: University Archives, SL2650/2

The Tecoan 1923

The Tecoan 1923

Staff Person: Suellyn Lathrop

Description:
From 1914 to 1919 the students and teachers had published the Training School Quarterly a multi-purpose periodical containing lesson plans, articles, reports on student activities, photos of graduates and alumni news. In 1921 the Training School became East Carolina Teachers College with a four year program. The growth of the school led to the debut of the Tecoan in 1923. It was the first yearbook published by the students of East Carolina Teachers College. The name Tecoan is taken from the words TEachers COllege ANnual. It was published each year until 1952.  In 1953 the students began publishing the Buccaneer which ran until 1976. Some mismanagement of funds by the SGA and a general lack of interest on the part of the students led to a two year suspension in publication. A short run was published between 1979 and 1990 and last year a centennial edition came out. The Treasure Chest video yearbooks were produced from 1992 to 1997. Photos of seniors have been scanned and are available online in the University Archives Photograph Collection.

The Tecoan 1952

The Tecoan 1952

In University Archives the publications are part of the Student Media Board records. In North Carolina Collection they have the call numbers: LD 1741 E44 T72x – Training School Quarterly, LB 1927 E3x – Tecoan and Buccaneer.

Click on the above images to see enlarged versions.

James Yadkin Joyner

Source: James Yadkin Joyner Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #345

James Yadkin Joyner

James Yadkin Joyner

Staff Person: Coleen Allen

Description:

The following biography is credited to the website it was taken from. There are also links to more information on Joyner listed, including a link to his papers held here in Special Collections. This photo of the “younger” Joyner came from this collection. The inscription on the back reads “Member of Philanthropic Literary Society, University of North Carolina, ca. 1880.”

J. Y. Joyner became prominent in the field of Public Education in North Carolina as Superintendent of Public Instruction. Dr. Joyner was born August 7, 1862 at Yadkin College in Davidson County and thus acquired his middle name. His parents had fled from their old home in Lenoir County when New Bern fell to Union forces. Eight months after his birth his mother died, and six months later his father died. He was raised by his elderly grandfather, Council Wooten. At the death of his grandfather he lived with the family of an uncle, Shadrack I. Wooten. In 1882-83 Joyner served as the 20-year old superintendent of schools for Lenoir County, the youngest such official until that time. A year later he went to Winston-Salem to teach in a grade school, organized by Calvin H. Bliley, the first State Superintendent of Schools.

He decided to go into the legal profession and studied law with Faircloth and Allen in Goldsboro during 1884-85. While he was studying law, he got a telegram inviting him to teach at Winston-Salem Grade Schools. He dropped his law books to take the offer and spent a year at the school, rooming with Charles McIver, the principal.

James Yadkin Joyner

James Yadkin Joyner

He was admitted to the bar in 1886 and practiced in Goldsboro. He was an active figure in Goldsboro and Wayne County, serving as Chairman of the Wayne County Board of Education for two terms. It was there that he first became well acquainted with an up-and-coming lawyer who was to become Governor Aycock. The courtroom did not appeal to him and he became Superintendent of Graded Schools in Goldsboro. After being there for several years, he joined Dr. McIver in Greensboro as teacher of English and dean of the faculty of the State Normal and Industrial Institute (later Woman’s College, and still later the University of North Carolina at Greensboro). He became State Superintendent of Public Schools in 1901,and remained until 1919 when he resigned because of ill health. He was president of the North Carolina Teachers’ Association, president of the National Education Association, president of the Southern Education Association, and held many other offices. The University of North Carolina conferred upon him the L L.D. degree. He died in 1954.

Click on the images shown above to see enlarged versions.

Above Found At UNC-CH Joyner Residence Hall History

Link to Papers: Manuscript Collection 345

Other Links:

James Yadkin Joyner

James Yadkin Joyner

James Yadkin Joyner

ECU J.Y. Joyner Building History

ECTTS Faculty Meeting Minutes

Source: University Archives, FA0000

ECTTS Faculty Meeting Minutes

ECTTS Faculty Meeting Minutes

Staff Person: Suellyn Lathrop

Description:
Long before there was any thought of a faculty senate, there were ten faculty members and a president starting a two-year school for a student body consisting of 104 women and 19 men. Students enrolled on October 5th, classes began and on October 19th the faculty held their first weekly meeting. The first order of business was the curriculum which had been set up by President Wright. Adjustments were made and the meeting adjourned.

The second meeting is also recorded on this first page. The first item on the agenda was “What shall we do with students who willfully or otherwise fail to attend recitation.” It was decided that absences should be reported to the president daily. The faculty continued to meet over the years discussing curriculum, student discipline and activities and the business of running a college. Even before there was shared governance, there was shared governance.

The meeting minutes are available for research in the University Archives, record group FA0000.

Kinston High School’s Little Mothers League for Better Babies

Source: Fred & Susan Brock Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #869

Kinston High School's Little Mothers League for Better Babies

Kinston High School's Little Mothers League for Better Babies

Staff Person: Jon Dembo

Description:
The image below is a reproduction of Kinston High School’s Little Mothers League for Better Babies’ group portrait (ca. 1920). It was apparently made from Sadie Stadiem’s copy of the original photograph. The name of the photographer, E. D. Sparrow, of Kinston, NC, appears in the lower right corner of the print.

On the back of the original photographic print is written the admonition: “Lest I forget” and the names of the girls and their unidentified nurse. Reading from left to right, they are:

     Amie Jordan Parham
    Betty Diamond
    Violet Mausfield
    Marjorie Hunter
    Dorothy Suggs
    Grace Wooten
    Ruby Taylor
    Carrie Mae Dunn
    Louise Tull
    Eleanor Edwards
    Mary Emma Bizzel
    Sadie Stadiem
    Louise Bland
    Gladys Worthington
    Ruby Mewbern
    Edna Tilman (Nurse)

The photograph was a gift of Fred and Susan Block, of Wilmington, NC, 4 February 2002 (Mss #869.1.a). You may access the finding aid to the Fred and Susan Block Collection at: Manuscript Collection 869.

If anyone can identify the nurse, standing at right, please contact the Special Collections Department at (252) 328-6671.

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.