Juanita Worsley Williams

Source: East Carolina University Centennial Oral History Collection, 45-05-01-14:

Staff Person:  Lynette Lundin

Description:

Juanita Williams grew up in Rocky Mount, North Carolina she was one of 13 children. She graduated East Carolina Teachers College in 1932. She talks about her experiences during the depression and going to ECTC. This is one of 33 Centennial Oral Histories. You can find this in our digital collections at http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/1270

1956 GMC Work Trucks Foldout Brochure Poster

Source: Barbour Boat Works, Inc. Records, 1943-1998, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #758

Staff Person: Dale Sauter

Description:

General Motors Corporation (GMC) has flourished throughout much of its history as a major American automobile manufacturer. Considered “one of the big three,” alongside Ford and Chrysler, GMC was created in 1908. The great Wall Street crash in 1929 put a quick halt to all expansion plans for GMC, as its stock price quickly fell. In 1930, GMC bought Electro-Motive Corporation, the internal combustion engine railcar builder. For several years to come, GMC-powered diesel locomotives were heavily used on American railroads. During the early 1930′s GMC continued its recovery and bought the Yellow Coach Bus Company. In 1955 GMC became the first company to make more than a billion dollars in one year. At one time GMC was also the largest corporation in the United States and the single largest employer in the world. However, in 2005 GMC posted a loss of $4 billion, laid off approximately 30,000 employees, and closed 12 plants. GMC largely flourished as a company for nearly a century before officially declaring bankruptcy in June 2009.

Source: http://ezinearticles.com/?The-History-of-GM—General-Motors&id=110696

Today’s staff pick offers a glimpse into the golden age of GMC. This is a foldout brochure poster advertising GMC’s line of work trucks for 1956. The brochure was sent from Craven Motor Co., Inc. in New Bern, N.C. to Barbour Boat Works (also in New Bern).

For more information on the Barbour Boat Works Records or any other collections we hold, please contact us for further details.

1956 GMC work trucks foldout brochure poster

1956 GMC work trucks foldout brochure poster

1956 GMC work trucks foldout brochure poster

1956 GMC work trucks foldout brochure poster

Letter from Harry S. Logan to his half-sister, Mrs. H.C. (Murdena Susan Logan) Kennerley

Source: Guide to the Harry Seymour Logan Papers, 1930-1936, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #111

Letter from Harry Seymour Logan to his half-sister

Letter from Harry Seymour Logan to his half-sister

Staff Person: Dale Sauter

Description:

We hear a lot of comparisons these days between the current economic climate and the era of the Great Depression. Today’s staff pick is a portion of a letter that offers some public viewpoint during the time of the depression. The letter, dated October 22, 1931, was written by Harry Seymour Logan in Oakland, CA, to this half-sister, Mrs. H.C. (Murdena Susan Logan) Kennerley in Pinehurst, NC. Remarking on existing economic conditions, Logan mentions that “Seattle I understand for the first time in her history [has] a breadline for women and children, which is pretty tough.” Logan goes on to make further comments of a more social and political nature when he says, “No wonder we have radicals and soap box artists. I don’t believe that the people who live in luxury can help feeling blue over the present situation, I imagine that people who boosted for the apparent jelly fish Hoover feel now as I do (a sap) I don’t think anyone blames him for the deppression [sic] but they feel he has the power and authority to untangle the mess.”

For more information on President Hoover’s reaction to the Great Depression, see the following online article.

http://historicaltextarchive.com/sections.php?action=read&artid=603

For more information on the Harry Seymour Logan Papers or any other collections we hold, please contact us for further details.

Hoover Days Cart

Source: Guide to the Daily Reflector Negative Collection, ca. 1920-1967, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #741

Hoover cart

Hoover cart

Staff Person: Nanette Hardison

Description:

The image shown above (1951) is of two men in a cart drawn by a mule with the purpose of persuading voters to cast their ballots for Adlai Stevenson in the 1952 Presidential Election. The vehicle represents a “Hoover Cart”, a symbol of the Great Depression. The Hoover Cart was driven by North Carolina farmers as a form of transportation during the Depression and was built by taking the rear wheels off of a car and attaching them to a cart. The cart was then pulled by either mule or horse. The drivers of these carts would stop at service stations for water for the horse or mule and air for the tires, for which there was no cost.

This image can be found in the Daily Reflector Negative Collection #741.1.d.57. The collection is a treasure trove of images documenting Greenville, N.C., which were taken between 1947 and 1967 by Greenville’s Daily Reflector photographers. Persons who are interested in viewing more images from the collection can go to http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/reflector/. Further information can be found at http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/special/ead/findingaids/0741/.

Source: Kammerer, Roger and Pearce, Candace. Images of America Greenville. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, copyrighted 2001.

ECTC Budget Cuts, 1932

Source: University Archives, CH1050/3/1

Meeting minutes declaring budget cuts.

Meeting minutes declaring budget cuts.

Staff Person: Suellyn Lathrop

Description:
During the Depression the state of North Carolina began cutting budgets and in 1931-32 fiscal year declared it would operate on a cash only basis. On February 17, 1932 Robert Wright held an emergency meeting of the entire faculty and staff to discuss the reductions in budgets. The Budget Bureau had asked for a 30% reduction in the school’s budget amounting to $20,000 which is the equivalent of $256,223.63 today. Dr. Wright asked the staff to consider a voluntary reduction in salary of 10% over the four remaining months of the fiscal year. Sallie Joyner Davis made the motion to make the reduction and the motion carried unanimously.

Meeting minutes declaring budget cuts.

Meeting minutes declaring budget cuts.

The next item on the agenda was the Summer School. Dr. Wright gave three reasons to maintain it: 1) 150 women were committed to coming, 50 of whom would graduate at the end of the summer, 2) difficulty in resuming should they quit and 3) keeping as many people on campus employed through the summer as possible. In addition the Summer School budget was cut by 2/3 from $15,000 to $5,000. The school weathered these budget cuts and continued to grow throughout the 1930′s.

These meeting minutes are part of the Chancellor’s Administrative File found in the University Archives.